CAMS 2016 - 10th IFAC Conference on Control Applications in Marine Systems

13-16 September 2016
Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, Trondheim

CAMS 2016 - 10th IFAC Conference on Control Applications in Marine Systems

13-16 September 2016
Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, Trondheim

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, on Foundations of Risk Analysis and Application to Aviation Safety Management

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, on Foundations of Risk Analysis and Application to Aviation Safety Management 25 August 2016...

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, on Foundations of Risk Analysis and Application to Aviation Safety Management

25 August 2016 10:15-11:00
Telenor auditorium, Tyholt, Trondheim


Guest lecture by Prof. Jeffrey Falzarano, Texas A&M University, USA, on Nonlinear Ship Rolling Motion: the importance of Physical Modeling, Nonlinear Dynamics and Stochastic Dynamics

25 August 2016 14:15-15:00
Room T3, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Jeffrey Falzarano, Texas A&M University, USA, on Nonlinear Ship Rolling Motion: the importance of Physical Modeling, Nonlinear Dynamics and Stochastic Dynamics

25 August 2016 14:15-15:00
Room T3, Marine Technology Centre

About the lecture:

This talk will emphasize that the understanding of at least these three topics is crucial to accurately predicting the occurrence of critical large amplitude ship rolling motions possibly leading to capsizing. Only a balanced approach incorporating all three can have any hope of achieving the goals of the IMO’s proposed Second Generation Ship Stability Criteria. Development of any analytic criteria for dynamic stability assessment involves two steps – first is formulating a model which effectively captures the physics of the problem with reasonable accuracy and the second is the application of analytical techniques to the chosen model.

While developing a model one needs to adequately understand the relative importance of hydrodynamic, and hydrostatics forces and moments; particularly, the roll damping which is at least as important as the hydrostatic restoring moment. Both nonlinearity and coupling of the roll motion to the other degrees of freedom are important. The nonlinearity due to the softening stiffness is particularly important when analyzing roll motion of ships.  

The second part of the talk will address the various analytical techniques which can be applied to analyze the probabilistic characteristics (both long term and short term) of roll response due to the random nature of the wind and wave excitation. Particular focus will be given to the quantification of the probability of escape from the bounded safe region. The calculated escape probability will indicate the reliability of the system. Finally, a physics based approach such as described herein will be equally applicable to either ship shaped or non-ship shaped floating offshore platforms.

Short Bio:

Dr. Jeffrey Falzarano is professor of Ocean Engineering at Texas A&M University. He received his BS degree in Naval Architecture from Webb Institute. He received his Master’s and PhD from the University of Michigan in Naval Architecture. He also obtained Master’s degrees in Applied Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan. At Texas A&M, he is the Director of the Marine Dynamics Laboratory and Director of Graduate Programs of the recently formed Ocean Engineering Department. He has over 25 years of experience as a tenure/tenure track naval architecture and ocean engineering faculty member. He has supervised and graduated over 40 graduate students and has published more than 100 publications in refereed journals and international conference proceedings describing this work. Based upon his significant original contributions to the study of nonlinear and stochastic dynamics of ships and marine structures in 2005, he was elected a fellow in both the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Prior to his academic career, Dr. Falzarano worked as a naval architect for the US Coast Guard’s design branch where amongst other projects, he participated in the hydrodynamic design of a proposed SWATH patrol cutter and the concept design of an icebreaker. He has also interned at the US Coast Guard doing ship stability research and ABS R&D supporting the development of their Response Based MODU Stability Criteria. He has also worked as visiting professor at various research labs and international academic institutions.


Guest lecture by Professor Martin Guay, Queen's University, Canada, on the Design of high-performance extremum-seeking control systems

24 June 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Professor Martin Guay, Queen's University, Canada, on the Design of high-performance extremum-seeking control systems

24 June 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

About the lecture:

In this talk, we will discuss a new approach to address the removal of time-scale separation in the design of extremum-seeking controllers for unknown non-linear dynamical systems.  A fast extremum seeking controller design approach is proposed to minimize the impacts of time-separation on the transient performance of control systems. The application of the ESC approach  to feedback stabilization, observer design and distributed optimization will be discussed. We will also present a number of successful industrial implementations of ESC.

Short Bio:

Martin Guay is a Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. He received his PhD from Queen's University in 1996. Dr. Guay is associate editor for Automatica and IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology. He is deputy editor-in-chief of the Journal of Process Control and Review Editor for the Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering. He was the recipient of the Syncrude Innovation award from the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers. He also received the Premier Research Excellence award. His research interests are in the area of nonlinear control systems including extremum-seeking control, nonlinear model predictive control, adaptive estimation and control, and geometric control.  


Guest lecture by Ass. Prof. Ionela Prodan, LCIS, Grenoble INP, France, on Optimization Based-Control Design for Reliable Microgrid Energy Management and Flatness-based nonlinear control strategies for trajectory tracking of quadcopter systems

15 June 2016 13:15-14:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Ass. Prof. Ionela Prodan, LCIS, Grenoble INP, France, on Optimization Based-Control Design for Reliable Microgrid Energy Management and Flatness-based nonlinear control strategies for trajectory tracking of quadcopter systems

15 June 2016 13:15-14:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

About the lecture "Optimization Based-Control Design for Reliable Microgrid Energy Management ":

This work presents an extension of a MPC (Model Predictive Control) approach for microgrid energy management which takes into account electricity costs, power consumption, generation profiles, power and energy constraints as well as uncertainty due to variations in the environment. The approach is based on a coherent framework of control tools, like mixed-integer programming and soft constrained MPC, for describing the microgrid components dynamics and the overall system control architecture. Fault tolerant strategies are inserted in order to ensure the proper amount of energy in the storage devices such that (together with the utility grid) the essential consumer demand is always covered. Simulation results on a particular microgrid architecture validate the proposed approach.

About the lecture "Flatness-based nonlinear control strategies for trajectory tracking of quadcopter systems ":

This work addresses the intensively studied trajectory tracking problem for a quadcopter system.

It provides a full flat parametrization of the inputs and states. Way-point constraints are taken into account and enforced through B-spline characterizations of the flat output. Several control strategies based on computed torque control and feedback linearization are presented and compared.

The advantages of flatness within each control strategy are analyzed and detailed through extensive simulation results.

Short Bio:

Ionela Prodan received the B.E. degree from the University ''Politehnica'' of Bucharest, Romania in 2009.

She continued her studies with a PhD in Control Engineering (2009-2012) at Supélec, Gif-sur-Yvette, France and a one year and half (2013-2014) postdoctoral fellowship within the Chair on Systems Science and the Energetic Challenge - EDF, École Centrale Paris, France. She is currently an Associate Professor at INP Grenoble, LCIS (Laboratory of Conception and Integration of Systems) in France. Her research interests are multi-disciplinary with a core expertise in control and applied mathematics. They are encompassing constrained optimization-based control (via distributed and decentralized approaches), mixed-integer programming, set-theoretic methods and their application to energy systems and multi-agent dynamical systems in general. Further details about her research and publications can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/iprodanionela/. 


Guest lecture by Chris Meissen, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Performance and Safety Certification of Interconnected Systems

30 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Auditorium T7, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Chris Meissen, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Performance and Safety Certification of Interconnected Systems

30 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Auditorium T7, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract:

Existing computational tools for the analysis of dynamical systems do not scale well to large-scale networked systems. In this talk we present a compositional method to certify performance and safety properties of interconnected systems. Using the dissipativity properties of each individual subsystem we formulate the certification problem as a large-scale optimization problem. This problem searches for the dissipativity properties of the subsystems that are most relevant in terms of certifying the specified performance or safety property. Distributed optimization techniques, specifically the alternating direction method of multipliers(ADMM), is employed to decompose and efficiently solve this problem.

Biography:

Chris Meissen is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Berkeley in the Berkeley Center for Control and Identification. He is under the supervision of Dr. Andrew Packard and Dr. Murat Arcak. He received his B.S. from Kansas State University in 2007 and his M.S. from Colorado State University in 2009, both in Mechanical Engineering. His research interests include dynamical system analysis, robust and nonlinear control theory, and large-scale optimization, especially semidefinite and sum-of-squares programming.


Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Control Synthesis with Formal Methods: Exploiting System Structure for Scalability

26 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Control Synthesis with Formal Methods: Exploiting System Structure for Scalability

26 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

ABSTRACT: 

The field of formal methods has developed efficient techniques for the verification and synthesis of systems described by finite state transition models, such as computer programs and digital circuits. Leveraging formal methods to automate control synthesis for dynamical systems is an active and promising research area, but is hindered by two major problems: (1) the difficulty of abstracting a finite state transition model from a continuous dynamical model, and (2) when such abstraction is possible, the prohibitively large number of finite states that result even from a modest size continuous system.  In this talk we present two structural properties that help us overcome these problems. The first property is “mixed monotonicity” which relaxes the classical notion of an order preserving (“monotone”) system.  We will see how this property allows a computationally efficient finite abstraction and illustrate the result on a macroscopic model of vehicle traffic flow.  The second property is decomposability into sparsely connected subsystems. Using this property, we will exhibit a compositional synthesis technique that constructs a composite controller by introducing “contracts” between the subsystems.

BIOGRAPHY: 

Murat Arcak is a professor at U.C. Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department.  He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey (1996) and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1997 and 2000). His research is in dynamical systems and control theory with applications to synthetic biology, multi-agent systems, and transportation. He received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2003, the Donald P. Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in 2006, the Control and Systems Theory Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2007, and the Antonio Ruberti Young Researcher Prize from the IEEE Control Systems Society in 2014. He is a member of SIAM and a fellow of IEEE.


Guest lecture by Prof. Henrik O. Madsen, DTU, on how we can support the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through research and innovation

29 March 2016 13:15-14:00
Auditorium EL6, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Henrik O. Madsen, DTU, on how we can support the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through research and innovation

29 March 2016 13:15-14:00
Auditorium EL6, Gløshaugen

About the speaker:

Prof. Henrik Madsen has a broad experience from academia and industry. He has made significant contributions to research, industrial and societal development though his unique career from a university researcher to CEO of DNVGL with 16 000 employees.

He is currently serving the society for instance as a chairman of the main board of the Research Council of Norway and as a member of the United Nations Global Compact Board, the world’s largest voluntary corporate sustainability initiative.

  


Guest lecture by Prof. Kanna Rajan, NTNU, on NASA Spaceflight missisons: What goes on behind-the-scenes?

1 April 2016 12:00-13:00
Auditorium EL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Kanna Rajan, NTNU, on NASA Spaceflight missisons: What goes on behind-the-scenes?

1 April 2016 12:00-13:00
Auditorium EL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Assistant Prof. John Hedengren, Brigham Young University, on Ensemble Model Predictive Control for Managed Pressure Drilling

17 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Assistant Prof. John Hedengren, Brigham Young University, on Ensemble Model Predictive Control for Managed Pressure Drilling

17 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Abstract

With the recent advance in high speed data communication offered by wired drill pipe telemetry, several automated control systems directly utilize downhole data (e.g. vibration) to optimize drilling performance such as rate of penetration (ROP). With additional high-speed telemetry data such as pressure, it is possible to couple ROP and drilling hydraulics into a single controller for managed pressure drilling systems. This multivariate controller improves drilling performance during normal drilling operations and enhances safety during abnormal drilling conditions such as pipe connection procedures and with unwanted gas influx. These automation strategies rely on a foundation of stable and reliable measurements of critical drilling parameters. When high-speed telemetry to downhole measurements is unavailable then several automation applications degrade in performance, require use of soft sensors (predictive models), or revert to manual control. Incorporating the predictive capability of high-fidelity hydraulic and drill-string dynamic models into automation strategies is an active area of development. This presentation explores the intersection of varying degrees of model sophistication and changing measurement availability for managed pressure drilling automation. The objective is to maintain bit pressure within +/- 1 bar of the 400 bar set point during normal drilling operations despite temporary signal loss and poor data quality. Also, the bit pressure is held within +/- 5 bar of the 340 bar set point during a pipe connection procedure with no bit pressure measurements available to the controller. Additionally, the controller response to unexpected gas influx as a process disturbance is simulated. The ensemble approach is proposed to automatically switch between models and available measurements to achieve a higher degree of reliability and availability during common phases of drilling.

Short bio

John Hedengren is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Brigham Young University. He received a PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he developed the APMonitor Optimization Suite and worked with ExxonMobil on Advanced Process Control for 5 years. His current research interests include drilling automation, fiber optic monitoring, Intelli-fields, reservoir optimization, unmanned aerial systems, and model predictive control.  He is a principal investigator of the Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-UAS) and applies UAV computer vision and optimization technology to energy and infrastructure monitoring. He is a member of the DSAT (Drilling Systems Automation Technical Section) committee of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), focusing on accelerating automation technology in the well drilling industry and has been an invited panelist to discuss emerging topics in automation. BP, ExxonMobil, Hess, Astro Technology, Apache Corp, SINTEF, Schlumberger, NOV, IRIS, and others have been active collaborators of the BYU PRISM group in developing upstream telemetry and automation.


Guest lecture by Prof. Karl H. Johansson, KTH/NTNU AMOS, on the Role of Plant Model Information in Large-scale Control Systems

10 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Karl H. Johansson, KTH/NTNU AMOS, on the Role of Plant Model Information in Large-scale Control Systems

10 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Advances in networked control systems have created new opportunities and challenges in controlling large-scale systems composed of several interacting subsystems. Many researchers have considered the problem of distributed control of such systems. However, at the heart of these control methods lies the (sometimes implicit) assumption that the designer has access to the global plant model information when designing a local controller. In contrast, in this talk we formulate and solve some distributed control design problems where the full plant model is not globally available. We investigate the achievable closed-loop performance of linear plants under a quadratic cost performance and give some fundamental bounds. We motivate and illustrate the results through applications in transportation and power systems.


Guest lecture by Adj. Ass. Prof. Ulrik D. Nielsen, DTU/NTNU AMOS, on new concepts for shipboard sea state estimation

27 January 2016 12:15-13:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Adj. Ass. Prof. Ulrik D. Nielsen, DTU/NTNU AMOS, on new concepts for shipboard sea state estimation

27 January 2016 12:15-13:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

The wave buoy analogy is a tested means for shipboard sea state estimation. Basically, the estimation principle resembles that of a traditional wave rider buoy which relies on transfer functions used to relate measured wave-induced responses and the unknown wave excitation. This paper addresses however a newly developed concept of the wave buoy analogy but the approach presented herein is, on the contrary, not relying exclusively on transfer functions. Instead, the method combines a signal-based part, estimating wave frequency, and a model-based part, estimating wave amplitude and phase, where only the model-based part depends on transfer functions whereas the signal-based part relies on the measured vessel response alone. Case studies in terms of hypothetical examples show that the method is capable to reconstruct fully the wave elevation process of a sinusoidal regular wave; which includes estimation of the wave's frequency, amplitude and phase, respectively. At this stage, the method is far from being a useful means in practical, real-situation applications but the method provides, indeed, a valuable step towards developing new approaches for shipboard sea state estimation.