Guest lecture by Prof. Bernard Molin, École Centrale de Marseille, France, on “Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with multiple vertical cylinders”

11 January 2017 14:00-14:45
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Bernard Molin, École Centrale de Marseille, France, on “Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with multiple vertical cylinders”

11 January 2017 14:00-14:45
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

Sloshing tests are performed on a rectangular tank filled with bottom-mounted vertical cylinders, around the natural frequency of the first sloshing mode. The numbers and heights of the cylinders are varied. From the position of the resonance peak an experimental dispersion equation is derived, and compared with different formulations from literature. A new formulation is proposed. A modal approach is then applied to derive the RAO of the sloshing response, and compared with the experimental results.

Short bio

Professor Bernard Molin has for the last years been a professor at École Centrale de Marseille. His research activities have been mainly concerned with nonlinear hydrodynamics (drift forces, slow drift motion, high frequency loads and response), and development of computer models for the French offshore industry. Recent involvement has included hydrodynamics of perforated structures, Vortex Induced Vibrations, slamming, moon-pool resonances, hydroelastic responses, sloshing in tanks and motion coupling, run-up effects and slow-drift excitation.


Guest lecture by Prof. Antonios Tsourdos, Cranfield University, on "Multiple Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Architectures, Algorithms and Applications"

20 January 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Antonios Tsourdos, Cranfield University, on "Multiple Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Architectures, Algorithms and Applications"

20 January 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract: 

Multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAVs) can provide significant reductions in manpower and risk to humans for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), including: enhancement of ISR coverage; increase in the mission success rate; increase of autonomy; robustness and benign degradation in performance. Using a swarm of UAVs has been receiving attention for a variety of applications to take advantage of its inherent flexibility and versatility. The focus of this talk is airborne monitoring of ground traffic behaviour by multiple UAVs in order to detect disguised threats and then to notify the human commander about the potentially dangerous vehicles. Within this traffic the most difficult challenge is to recognise behaviours of the potentially dangerous vehicles, disguised as legitimate traffic. Most of these activities of the dangerous vehicles are characterised by occasional deviations from motion characteristics of the legitimate traffic. For such ISR mission to be successful, the overall autonomy should be able to provide continuity of tracking of the vehicles of interest and thus enable positive identification of suspects. 

Biographical Note:

Antonios Tsourdos is a Professor of Autonomous Systems and Control Engineering and Director of Research – Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing at Cranfield University. Professor Tsourdos received his PhD degree on nonlinear flight control by the Cranfield University in 1999. Professor Tsourdos was member of the Team Stellar, the winning team for the UK MoD Grand Challenge (2008) and the IET Innovation Award (Category Team, 2009). Professor Tsourdos is an editorial board member of the Proceedings of the  IMechE Part G Journal of Aerospace Engineering, the International Journal of Systems Science, the IEEE Transactions of Aerospace and Electronic Systems and the Aerospace Science & Technology. Professor Tsourdos is a vice-chair of the IFAC Technical Committees on Aerospace Control, and member of the IFAC Technical Committes on Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles, on Networked Systems and on Discrete Event and Hybrid Systems, the AIAA Technical Committee on Guidance, Control & Navigation (AIAA GNC TC) and the IEEE Control System Society Technical Committee on Aerospace Control (TCAC). Professor Tsourdos is also member of IET Robotics & Mechatronics Executive Team. Professor Tsourdos’s research interests include guidance and control of single and multiple vehicles, network decision systems, cyber-physical systems, multiple vehicle reasoning and integrated vehicle health management. He has published more than 200 papers and three books.

Prof. Antonios Tsourdos' homepage


Guest lecture by Associate Prof. Gustaf Hendeby, Linköping University, on "Animals Target Tracking Inspired by Biologists"

20 January 2017 at 9:15-10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Associate Prof. Gustaf Hendeby, Linköping University, on "Animals Target Tracking Inspired by Biologists"

20 January 2017 at 9:15-10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract:

In this presentation I will discuss target tracking problems that we have encountered while collaborating with biologists. The purpose has been to simplify the biologists everyday work, by automating otherwise time consuming manual labor.  Target tracking is generally considered a mature research field; with well established statistical methods that can be used more or less out of the box.  However, the majority of the available literature deals with surveillance scenarios where vehicles or aircraft are tracked.  Tracking of animals and other natural phenomena, which often is the objective for biologists, is less well covered in the standard tracking literature and result in new challenges.  Examples will be presented of how to extended standard methods to better handle the encountered problem formulations; eg, by introducing a new constrained motion model to be able to follow dolphins in a partially occluded basin, or extracting visual queues to detect the take-off time and direction of migrating birds in Emlen funnels.  Though going slightly outside the standard methods, these tricks fit nicely into the general tracking framework.

Biosketch:

Gustaf Hendeby is Associate Professor and Docent in Automatic Control, in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Linköping University.  He received his MSc in Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering in 2002 and his PhD in Automatic Control in 2008, both from Linköping University.  He worked as Senior Researcher at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) 2009-2011, and Senior Scientist at Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) and held an adjunct Associate Professor position at Linköping University 2011-2015. Dr. Hendeby's main research interests are stochastic signal processing and sensor fusion with applications to nonlinear problems, target tracking, and simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM).  He has experience of both theoretical analysis as well as implementation aspects.

Gustaf Hendeby's homepage