Guest lecture by Prof. Henrik O. Madsen, DTU, on how we can support the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through research and innovation

29 March 2016 13:15-14:00
Auditorium EL6, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Henrik O. Madsen, DTU, on how we can support the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through research and innovation

29 March 2016 13:15-14:00
Auditorium EL6, Gløshaugen

About the speaker:

Prof. Henrik Madsen has a broad experience from academia and industry. He has made significant contributions to research, industrial and societal development though his unique career from a university researcher to CEO of DNVGL with 16 000 employees.

He is currently serving the society for instance as a chairman of the main board of the Research Council of Norway and as a member of the United Nations Global Compact Board, the world’s largest voluntary corporate sustainability initiative.

  


Guest lecture by Prof. Kanna Rajan, NTNU, on NASA Spaceflight missisons: What goes on behind-the-scenes?

1 April 2016 12:00-13:00
Auditorium EL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Kanna Rajan, NTNU, on NASA Spaceflight missisons: What goes on behind-the-scenes?

1 April 2016 12:00-13:00
Auditorium EL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Assistant Prof. John Hedengren, Brigham Young University, on Ensemble Model Predictive Control for Managed Pressure Drilling

17 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Assistant Prof. John Hedengren, Brigham Young University, on Ensemble Model Predictive Control for Managed Pressure Drilling

17 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Abstract

With the recent advance in high speed data communication offered by wired drill pipe telemetry, several automated control systems directly utilize downhole data (e.g. vibration) to optimize drilling performance such as rate of penetration (ROP). With additional high-speed telemetry data such as pressure, it is possible to couple ROP and drilling hydraulics into a single controller for managed pressure drilling systems. This multivariate controller improves drilling performance during normal drilling operations and enhances safety during abnormal drilling conditions such as pipe connection procedures and with unwanted gas influx. These automation strategies rely on a foundation of stable and reliable measurements of critical drilling parameters. When high-speed telemetry to downhole measurements is unavailable then several automation applications degrade in performance, require use of soft sensors (predictive models), or revert to manual control. Incorporating the predictive capability of high-fidelity hydraulic and drill-string dynamic models into automation strategies is an active area of development. This presentation explores the intersection of varying degrees of model sophistication and changing measurement availability for managed pressure drilling automation. The objective is to maintain bit pressure within +/- 1 bar of the 400 bar set point during normal drilling operations despite temporary signal loss and poor data quality. Also, the bit pressure is held within +/- 5 bar of the 340 bar set point during a pipe connection procedure with no bit pressure measurements available to the controller. Additionally, the controller response to unexpected gas influx as a process disturbance is simulated. The ensemble approach is proposed to automatically switch between models and available measurements to achieve a higher degree of reliability and availability during common phases of drilling.

Short bio

John Hedengren is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Brigham Young University. He received a PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he developed the APMonitor Optimization Suite and worked with ExxonMobil on Advanced Process Control for 5 years. His current research interests include drilling automation, fiber optic monitoring, Intelli-fields, reservoir optimization, unmanned aerial systems, and model predictive control.  He is a principal investigator of the Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-UAS) and applies UAV computer vision and optimization technology to energy and infrastructure monitoring. He is a member of the DSAT (Drilling Systems Automation Technical Section) committee of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), focusing on accelerating automation technology in the well drilling industry and has been an invited panelist to discuss emerging topics in automation. BP, ExxonMobil, Hess, Astro Technology, Apache Corp, SINTEF, Schlumberger, NOV, IRIS, and others have been active collaborators of the BYU PRISM group in developing upstream telemetry and automation.


Guest lecture by Prof. Karl H. Johansson, KTH/NTNU AMOS, on the Role of Plant Model Information in Large-scale Control Systems

10 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Karl H. Johansson, KTH/NTNU AMOS, on the Role of Plant Model Information in Large-scale Control Systems

10 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Advances in networked control systems have created new opportunities and challenges in controlling large-scale systems composed of several interacting subsystems. Many researchers have considered the problem of distributed control of such systems. However, at the heart of these control methods lies the (sometimes implicit) assumption that the designer has access to the global plant model information when designing a local controller. In contrast, in this talk we formulate and solve some distributed control design problems where the full plant model is not globally available. We investigate the achievable closed-loop performance of linear plants under a quadratic cost performance and give some fundamental bounds. We motivate and illustrate the results through applications in transportation and power systems.


Guest lecture by Adj. Ass. Prof. Ulrik D. Nielsen, DTU/NTNU AMOS, on new concepts for shipboard sea state estimation

27 January 2016 12:15-13:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Adj. Ass. Prof. Ulrik D. Nielsen, DTU/NTNU AMOS, on new concepts for shipboard sea state estimation

27 January 2016 12:15-13:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

The wave buoy analogy is a tested means for shipboard sea state estimation. Basically, the estimation principle resembles that of a traditional wave rider buoy which relies on transfer functions used to relate measured wave-induced responses and the unknown wave excitation. This paper addresses however a newly developed concept of the wave buoy analogy but the approach presented herein is, on the contrary, not relying exclusively on transfer functions. Instead, the method combines a signal-based part, estimating wave frequency, and a model-based part, estimating wave amplitude and phase, where only the model-based part depends on transfer functions whereas the signal-based part relies on the measured vessel response alone. Case studies in terms of hypothetical examples show that the method is capable to reconstruct fully the wave elevation process of a sinusoidal regular wave; which includes estimation of the wave's frequency, amplitude and phase, respectively. At this stage, the method is far from being a useful means in practical, real-situation applications but the method provides, indeed, a valuable step towards developing new approaches for shipboard sea state estimation.