Guest lecture by Ass. Prof. Dimitra Panagou, University of Michigan, USA, on a distributed semi-cooperative coordination protocol for dynamic multi-agent systems

29 November 2016 at 10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Ass. Prof. Dimitra Panagou, University of Michigan, USA, on a distributed semi-cooperative coordination protocol for dynamic multi-agent systems

29 November 2016 at 10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

ABSTRACT

Control of multi-agent systems and networked agents has been a popular topic of research with applications in autonomous unmanned vehicles and robotic assets. Planning, coordination and control for such complex systems is challenging due to the agents’ dynamics, restrictions in onboard power, sensing, communication and computation capabilities, the number of agents in the network, and uncertainty about the environment. In this talk we will present some of our recent results on the distributed semi-cooperative motion planning and coordination for multiple mobile agents that belong in different classes, which are defined in terms of their sensing/communication constraints and priorities. The proposed protocol achieves the on-the-fly prioritization among connected agents and preserves safety guarantees for the network with not all of the agents participating in conflict resolution and collision avoidance.

SHORT BIO

Dimitra Panagou received the Diploma and PhD degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 2006 and 2012, respectively. Since September 2014 she has been an Assistant Professor with the Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan. Prior to joining the University of Michigan, she was a postdoctoral research associate with the Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (2012-2014), a visiting research scholar with the GRASP Lab, University of Pennsylvania (June 2013, fall 2010) and a visiting research scholar with the University of Delaware, Mechanical Engineering Department (spring 2009). Her research interests include the fields of planning, coordination and distributed control of complex systems, with applications in unmanned aerial systems, robotic networks and autonomous multi-vehicle systems (ground, marine, aerial, space). She is a recipient of a NASA Early Faculty Career Award, of an AFOSR Young Investigator Award, and member of the IEEE and the AIAA.


Guest lecture by Dr Pere Ridao, University of Girona, Spain, on Intervention AUVs: Experiences and Challenges

15 November 2016 at 11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Pere Ridao, University of Girona, Spain, on Intervention AUVs: Experiences and Challenges

15 November 2016 at 11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

ABSTRACT

While commercially available AUVs are routinely used in survey missions, a new set of applications exists which clearly demand intervention capabilities. The maintenance of: permanent observatories underwater; submerged oil wells; cabled sensor networks; pipes; and the deployment and recovery of benthic stations are but a few of them. These tasks are addressed nowadays using manned submersibles or work-class ROVs, equipped with teleoperated arms under human supervision. Although researchers have recently opened the door to future I-AUVs, a long path is still necessary to pave the way to underwater intervention applications performed in an autonomous way. This talk reviews the evolution timeline in autonomous underwater intervention systems. Milestone projects in the state of the art will be reviewed, highlighting their principal contributions to the field. Next, GIRONA 500 Intervention AUV will be presented and its software architecture discussed. Recent results in different scenarios will be reported: 1) Valve turning and connector plugging/unplugging while docked, 2) Free floating valve turning  and connection plugging/unplugging , 3) Free floating multipurpose multisensory based object recovery and 4) manipulation in the presence of obstacles. The talk with a discussion about the lessons learnt and the future directions for research.

SHORT BIO

Pere Ridao received the Ph.D. degree in computer engineering in 2001 from the University of Girona, Spain. Since 1997, he has participated in 19 research projects (10 European and 9 National), he is the author of more than 100 publications, and he has directed 5 PhDs theses (3 more currently under direction) and 13 MSc theses. His research activity focuses on designing and developing Autonomous Underwater Vehicles for 3D Mapping and Intervention. He is the director of the Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute (VICOROB) and the head of the Underwater Robotics Research Center (CIRS) and an Associate professor with the Department of Computer Engineering of the University of Girona. Dr. Ridao is the chair of the IFAC's Technical Committee on Marine Systems. His research interest include intervention AUVs and Simultaneous Localization And Mapping methods for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles.


Guest lecture by Dr Fumin Zhang, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, on Motion Tomography and Collective Mobile Sensing in the Ocean

15 November 2016 at 10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Fumin Zhang, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, on Motion Tomography and Collective Mobile Sensing in the Ocean

15 November 2016 at 10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

ABSTRACT

Modeling and predicting ocean currents are great challenges for physical oceanography due to the lack of direct measurements. Mobile sensor networks have been proven to be an effective tool to answer this challenge, providing estimated flow information along the Lagrangian trajectories. To incorporate these flow estimates into ocean models, existing approaches based on Lagrangian data assimilation usually require significant amount of computing power.  We develop generic environmental models (GEMs) to combine computational ocean models with real-time data streams collected by mobile sensing platforms to provide high-resolution predictions of ocean current in a small spatial area around the mobile platforms.  Motion tomography (MT) can be viewed as a novel way to construct GEMs. The method fuses the data collected by multiple mobile platforms along their paths to formulate an “inverse problem” that has been the core problem underlying medical CT imaging. By solving this inverse problem, a high-resolution spatial map of ocean flow in the volume traversed by the mobile platforms can be reconstructed. While a similar inverse problem has been formulated and solved in ocean acoustic tomography to reconstruct spatial maps of sound speed, motion tomography provides a “directly measured” Eulerian map of ocean current, which has never been achieved by other means before. MT may significantly increase the spatial accuracy of GEMs. More accurate GEMs also feed high quality data to data assimilation algorithms, hence eventually improve ocean circulation models.

SHORT BIO

Dr. Fumin Zhang is Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received a PhD degree in 2004 from the University of Maryland (College Park) in Electrical Engineering, and held a postdoctoral position in Princeton University from 2004 to 2007. His research interests include mobile sensor networks, maritime robotics, control systems, and theoretical foundations for cyber-physical systems. He received the NSF CAREER Award in September 2009, the Lockheed Inspirational Young Faculty Award in March 2010, the ONR Young Investigator Program Award in April 2010, and the GT Roger P. Webb Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in April 2011. He is currently serving as the co-chair for the IEEE RAS Technical Committee on Marine Robotics, and the chair for the IEEE CSS Technical Committee on Robotic Control and Manufacturing Automation.


Guest lecture by Prof. Tristan Perez, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Topic: Dynamical System Behaviours - the Underlying Thread of My Current Research in Agriculture, Bio-inspired Guidance, and Trusted Autonomy

8 November 2016 at 13:15
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Tristan Perez, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Topic: Dynamical System Behaviours - the Underlying Thread of My Current Research in Agriculture, Bio-inspired Guidance, and Trusted Autonomy

8 November 2016 at 13:15
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract

The key role of cybernetics may be described as the study and design of dynamical system behaviours, namely restrictions on the universum of outcomes arising from the input-output product space, or if convenient, the input-state-output product space. Such restrictions establish what is possible and conversely what is not as systems interact with their environments. In this talk, I will use the behavioural approach to mathematical system theory to set the scene and discuss three problems in which in am currently doing research, and on which I would welcome collaborations. 

The first problem is related to Agricultural Cybernetics, which takes a system view of agriculture for the analysis and design of management strategies to control and optimise agricultural production systems while exploiting the intrinsic feedback information-exchanging mechanisms. This problem is rapidly gaining importance as digital technologies disrupt agriculture and data becomes available - big-data cybernetics. Feedback is great tool, but it is also the subject to fundamental limitations, which when not understood properly can lead to underwhelming results as well as wasting time and resources. This is where Agricultural Cybernetics enters the scene by seeking to answer fundamental questions related to systems and system behaviours.

The second problem relates to the use of inverse optimal control and inverse differential games to gain insight into the behaviours of birds avoiding impending collisions and how can these be translated into potential behaviours for UAS. Here, we exploit the discrete-time Minimum Principle plus structure in the in the cost functional of optimal control problems and differential games to infer elements of the cost functional from incomplete state information. 

The last problem relates to enabling aspects of autonomous system technology. We advocate that the assessment of hypotheses about system behaviours related to performance and safety can lead to decision theoretic frameworks for assessment of autonomy that can assist with regulation, insurance, and procurement decisions. Here we exploit the use of probability as an extension of logic leading to a Bayesian approach to quantify the uncertainty associated with decision problems related to the adoption of autonomy. We also discuss extensions to the assessment of learning agents.

Bio

Tristan Perez is Professor of Robotics and Autonomous Systems at The Queensland University of Technology (QUT).  He leads the IntelliSensing Enabling Platform at QUT's Institute for Future Environments. This is a transdisciplinary program that focuses on assisting industry to transition into the digital age - transforming data collection, modelling, analytics, decisions and control.  Tristan is an Assoc. Investigator at the ARC CoE for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers (ACEMS) and at ARC CoE for Robotic Vision (ACRV). He is also the Co-Chair – IFAC Technical Committee in Marine Systems.

Tristan conducts and leads research in the areas of:

  • Dynamics and control of cyber-physical systems
  • Robotics with applications to agriculture
  • Data-enabled Agriculture  
  • Bayesian inference and decisions under uncertainty
  • Biologically inspired behaviours for unmanned aircraft
  • Motion control of underwater vehicles close to the surface

From 2010 to 2014, he was the leader of the mechatronics program at the University of Newcastle in Australia, where he also lead a Laboratory for Autonomous Systems and Robotics. In this position, he  was working on assessment of robust autonomous systems, energy-based control of mechanical systems, and bio-inspired robust navigation systems for unmanned aircraft.  

From 2007 to 2010, he was with the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control (CDSC), at the University of Newcastle. From 2008 to 2012, he was also an Adjunct Associate Professor of ship dynamics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway. From 2004 to 2007 he was a senior researcher at the Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. 

Tristan completed his Electronic Engineering degree at the National University of Rosario, Argentina, in 1999 and a PhD in Control Engineering at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2003. He moved to QUT in 2014.

Tristan Perez
Professor - Robotics and Autonomous Systems
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science,
Queensland University of Technology (QUT)  

Gardens Point, S Block Level 11,
2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 | CRICOS No. 00213J
phone: + 61 7 3138 9076 | m: +61 4475 9 0011
e-mail: tristan.perez@qut.edu.au |
website: http://staff.qut.edu.au/staff/perez5/ 

Leader - IntelliSensing Enabling Platform, Institute for Future Environments, QUT
Honorary Professor - Dynamical Systems and Control, QBI, University of Queensland
Assoc. Investigator - ARC CoE for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers (ACEMS)
Assoc. Investigator - ARC CoE for Robotic Vision (ACRV)
Co-Chair – IFAC Technical Committee in Marine Systems
Publications: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/view/person/Perez,_Tristan.html 


NTNU AMOS Days - now presentations online!

27-28 October 2016
Quality Hotel Augustin, Trondheim

NTNU AMOS Days - now presentations online!

27-28 October 2016
Quality Hotel Augustin, Trondheim

Invited parties: NTNU AMOS employees and partners

Read the programme

See the presentations!


Open talk: underwater safari with NTNU AMOS professors

18 October 2016 19:00
Dokkhuset, Trondheim

Open talk: underwater safari with NTNU AMOS professors

18 October 2016 19:00
Dokkhuset, Trondheim

Guest lecture by Antonio Adaldo, KTH, Sweden, on multi-agent coordination with event-based cloud access

18 October 2016 13:00-14:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Antonio Adaldo, KTH, Sweden, on multi-agent coordination with event-based cloud access

18 October 2016 13:00-14:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

In this talk we present a multi-agent coordination problem where  agents communicate only by exchanging information in a cloud repository. The communication with the cloud is considered a shared and limited resource, and therefore it is used intermittently and asynchronously by the agents. The motivating application is the coordination of a fleet of underwater autonomous vehicles. The proposed approach takes advantage of having a shared asynchronous cloud support while guaranteeing a reduced number of communication. More in detail, each agent schedules its own sequence of cloud accesses in order to achieve a coordinated network goal. A control law is given with a criterion for scheduling the control updates recursively. The closed loop scheme is formally proven to achieve the desired coordination objective.

Short bio

Antonio Adaldo is a PhD student in the Automatic Control Department at the School of Electrical Engineering in KTH, under the supervision of Karl H. Johansson and Dimos V. Dimarogonas. He obtained the BSc and MSc degrees in Automation Engineering from the University of Naples Federico II. His research interests include hybrid and event-based control of multi-agent systems.


Ocean School of Innovation - From Idea To Market

18 October 2016 9:00-12:00
Innovation Norway, Trondheim

Ocean School of Innovation - From Idea To Market

18 October 2016 9:00-12:00
Innovation Norway, Trondheim

Abstract

The road from idea to market begins with letting the customers decide
whether your idea is good or bad. In this session you will learn how to test
and develop your business idea. You will also get information from Innovation
Norway on how they can help you along the road.

BUSINESS MODELLING
How to make an easy sketch of your idea. This tool can be utilized to get a quick overview
of the central elements in the business idea. It is easy to use, enables you to better
visualize the concept, and possibly make you see opportunities for different potential
business models.

LEAN START‐UP
How to quickly test your idea on potential customers and collaborators to maximize your
possibilities for success.

FINANCING
opportunities through Innovation Norway for testing and developing your idea.


Certified ScrumMaster Course for NTNU AMOS PhD candidates and spin-off companies

11-12 October 2016
Trondheim

Certified ScrumMaster Course for NTNU AMOS PhD candidates and spin-off companies

11-12 October 2016
Trondheim

Guest lecture by Monica Solem, Statoil Corporate Staff Safety & Security, on Statoil's global risk management, including IT Security

5 October 2016 9:15-10:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Monica Solem, Statoil Corporate Staff Safety & Security, on Statoil's global risk management, including IT Security

5 October 2016 9:15-10:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre
Monica Solem, Statoil Corporate Staff Safety & Security, will give a guest lecture on "Statoil's global risk management, including IT Security". 

Guest lecture by Prof. Theotokoglou, National Technical University of Athens, Greece, on the analysis of FRP composite structures in offshore wind turbines and other offshore structures

27 September 2016 14:15-16:00
Auditorium T7, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Theotokoglou, National Technical University of Athens, Greece, on the analysis of FRP composite structures in offshore wind turbines and other offshore structures

27 September 2016 14:15-16:00
Auditorium T7, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

Wind energy stands as one of the most important renewable energy sources. Wind turbine blades have grown considerably over the years, in order to gain more power. Large scale wind turbines blades are mainly based on fiber reinforced polymer composites; because an efficient way to further improves the performance of wind turbines is to reduce the weight of the onshore-offshore blades.

The problem of the interior support structure of a -high power- horizontal axis onshore-offshore wind turbine blade is investigated in this study. A very detailed finite element model is developed, simulating the load-bearing box girder of the blade with a given airfoil shape, size and the type and position of the interior longitudinal beams and shear-webs. Material selection is the key issue in the design of these structures, since efficiency depends on the high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. Previous work1 showed the challenging topics of material properties, design, topology details, computational analysis techniques and load response of a blade cross-section. In order to shed some light in a micro-scale level, a comparison of the most common composite blade materials (Glass fiber reinforced plastic and Carbon fiber reinforced plastic) is presented, regarding stress and strain distributions but also displacements, which are critical for optimal blade design.

Furthermore, wind turbine blades include many joints, where localized effects cause initiation of stress concentrations that may influence the static and fatigue strengths of the composite and sandwich parts2. They may also cause buckling phenomena with severe interlaminar and through-the-thickness normal stresses, which may determine the ultimate load-carrying capability of wind turbine blade structures. A failure criterion is applied based on the shell finite element analysis of the model, in order to dispose the stress levels throughout the box girder and locate the crack initiation point and the crack propagation. Results concerning both glass and carbon materials are presented.

The main objective of this study is to help further advance the use of computer-aided engineering methods and tools (e.g. geometrical modeling of the box girder, structural analysis and material selection methodologies) to the field of design and development of composite wind turbine blades, by assessing the stress state of the blade interior using the quasi-static finite element analysis and a post-processing methodology. The case of the tidal turbine blades will also be examined.


CAMS 2016 - 10th IFAC Conference on Control Applications in Marine Systems

13-16 September 2016
Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, Trondheim

CAMS 2016 - 10th IFAC Conference on Control Applications in Marine Systems

13-16 September 2016
Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, Trondheim

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, on Foundations of Risk Analysis and Application to Aviation Safety Management

25 August 2016 10:15-11:00
Telenor auditorium, Tyholt, Trondheim

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California, Los Angeles, USA, on Foundations of Risk Analysis and Application to Aviation Safety Management

25 August 2016 10:15-11:00
Telenor auditorium, Tyholt, Trondheim

Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California, Los Angeles, USA,  will give a guest lecture on the Foundations of Risk Analysis and Application to Aviation Safety Management.

Guest lecture by Prof. Jeffrey Falzarano, Texas A&M University, USA, on Nonlinear Ship Rolling Motion: the importance of Physical Modeling, Nonlinear Dynamics and Stochastic Dynamics

25 August 2016 14:15-15:00
Room T3, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Jeffrey Falzarano, Texas A&M University, USA, on Nonlinear Ship Rolling Motion: the importance of Physical Modeling, Nonlinear Dynamics and Stochastic Dynamics

25 August 2016 14:15-15:00
Room T3, Marine Technology Centre

About the lecture:

This talk will emphasize that the understanding of at least these three topics is crucial to accurately predicting the occurrence of critical large amplitude ship rolling motions possibly leading to capsizing. Only a balanced approach incorporating all three can have any hope of achieving the goals of the IMO’s proposed Second Generation Ship Stability Criteria. Development of any analytic criteria for dynamic stability assessment involves two steps – first is formulating a model which effectively captures the physics of the problem with reasonable accuracy and the second is the application of analytical techniques to the chosen model.

While developing a model one needs to adequately understand the relative importance of hydrodynamic, and hydrostatics forces and moments; particularly, the roll damping which is at least as important as the hydrostatic restoring moment. Both nonlinearity and coupling of the roll motion to the other degrees of freedom are important. The nonlinearity due to the softening stiffness is particularly important when analyzing roll motion of ships.  

The second part of the talk will address the various analytical techniques which can be applied to analyze the probabilistic characteristics (both long term and short term) of roll response due to the random nature of the wind and wave excitation. Particular focus will be given to the quantification of the probability of escape from the bounded safe region. The calculated escape probability will indicate the reliability of the system. Finally, a physics based approach such as described herein will be equally applicable to either ship shaped or non-ship shaped floating offshore platforms.

Short Bio:

Dr. Jeffrey Falzarano is professor of Ocean Engineering at Texas A&M University. He received his BS degree in Naval Architecture from Webb Institute. He received his Master’s and PhD from the University of Michigan in Naval Architecture. He also obtained Master’s degrees in Applied Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering from the University of Michigan. At Texas A&M, he is the Director of the Marine Dynamics Laboratory and Director of Graduate Programs of the recently formed Ocean Engineering Department. He has over 25 years of experience as a tenure/tenure track naval architecture and ocean engineering faculty member. He has supervised and graduated over 40 graduate students and has published more than 100 publications in refereed journals and international conference proceedings describing this work. Based upon his significant original contributions to the study of nonlinear and stochastic dynamics of ships and marine structures in 2005, he was elected a fellow in both the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Prior to his academic career, Dr. Falzarano worked as a naval architect for the US Coast Guard’s design branch where amongst other projects, he participated in the hydrodynamic design of a proposed SWATH patrol cutter and the concept design of an icebreaker. He has also interned at the US Coast Guard doing ship stability research and ABS R&D supporting the development of their Response Based MODU Stability Criteria. He has also worked as visiting professor at various research labs and international academic institutions.


Guest lecture by Professor Martin Guay, Queen's University, Canada, on the Design of high-performance extremum-seeking control systems

24 June 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Professor Martin Guay, Queen's University, Canada, on the Design of high-performance extremum-seeking control systems

24 June 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

About the lecture:

In this talk, we will discuss a new approach to address the removal of time-scale separation in the design of extremum-seeking controllers for unknown non-linear dynamical systems.  A fast extremum seeking controller design approach is proposed to minimize the impacts of time-separation on the transient performance of control systems. The application of the ESC approach  to feedback stabilization, observer design and distributed optimization will be discussed. We will also present a number of successful industrial implementations of ESC.

Short Bio:

Martin Guay is a Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. He received his PhD from Queen's University in 1996. Dr. Guay is associate editor for Automatica and IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology. He is deputy editor-in-chief of the Journal of Process Control and Review Editor for the Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering. He was the recipient of the Syncrude Innovation award from the Canadian Society of Chemical Engineers. He also received the Premier Research Excellence award. His research interests are in the area of nonlinear control systems including extremum-seeking control, nonlinear model predictive control, adaptive estimation and control, and geometric control.  


Guest lecture by Ass. Prof. Ionela Prodan, LCIS, Grenoble INP, France, on Optimization Based-Control Design for Reliable Microgrid Energy Management and Flatness-based nonlinear control strategies for trajectory tracking of quadcopter systems

15 June 2016 13:15-14:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Ass. Prof. Ionela Prodan, LCIS, Grenoble INP, France, on Optimization Based-Control Design for Reliable Microgrid Energy Management and Flatness-based nonlinear control strategies for trajectory tracking of quadcopter systems

15 June 2016 13:15-14:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

About the lecture "Optimization Based-Control Design for Reliable Microgrid Energy Management ":

This work presents an extension of a MPC (Model Predictive Control) approach for microgrid energy management which takes into account electricity costs, power consumption, generation profiles, power and energy constraints as well as uncertainty due to variations in the environment. The approach is based on a coherent framework of control tools, like mixed-integer programming and soft constrained MPC, for describing the microgrid components dynamics and the overall system control architecture. Fault tolerant strategies are inserted in order to ensure the proper amount of energy in the storage devices such that (together with the utility grid) the essential consumer demand is always covered. Simulation results on a particular microgrid architecture validate the proposed approach.

About the lecture "Flatness-based nonlinear control strategies for trajectory tracking of quadcopter systems ":

This work addresses the intensively studied trajectory tracking problem for a quadcopter system.

It provides a full flat parametrization of the inputs and states. Way-point constraints are taken into account and enforced through B-spline characterizations of the flat output. Several control strategies based on computed torque control and feedback linearization are presented and compared.

The advantages of flatness within each control strategy are analyzed and detailed through extensive simulation results.

Short Bio:

Ionela Prodan received the B.E. degree from the University ''Politehnica'' of Bucharest, Romania in 2009.

She continued her studies with a PhD in Control Engineering (2009-2012) at Supélec, Gif-sur-Yvette, France and a one year and half (2013-2014) postdoctoral fellowship within the Chair on Systems Science and the Energetic Challenge - EDF, École Centrale Paris, France. She is currently an Associate Professor at INP Grenoble, LCIS (Laboratory of Conception and Integration of Systems) in France. Her research interests are multi-disciplinary with a core expertise in control and applied mathematics. They are encompassing constrained optimization-based control (via distributed and decentralized approaches), mixed-integer programming, set-theoretic methods and their application to energy systems and multi-agent dynamical systems in general. Further details about her research and publications can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/iprodanionela/. 


Guest lecture by Chris Meissen, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Performance and Safety Certification of Interconnected Systems

30 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Auditorium T7, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Chris Meissen, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Performance and Safety Certification of Interconnected Systems

30 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Auditorium T7, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract:

Existing computational tools for the analysis of dynamical systems do not scale well to large-scale networked systems. In this talk we present a compositional method to certify performance and safety properties of interconnected systems. Using the dissipativity properties of each individual subsystem we formulate the certification problem as a large-scale optimization problem. This problem searches for the dissipativity properties of the subsystems that are most relevant in terms of certifying the specified performance or safety property. Distributed optimization techniques, specifically the alternating direction method of multipliers(ADMM), is employed to decompose and efficiently solve this problem.

Biography:

Chris Meissen is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Berkeley in the Berkeley Center for Control and Identification. He is under the supervision of Dr. Andrew Packard and Dr. Murat Arcak. He received his B.S. from Kansas State University in 2007 and his M.S. from Colorado State University in 2009, both in Mechanical Engineering. His research interests include dynamical system analysis, robust and nonlinear control theory, and large-scale optimization, especially semidefinite and sum-of-squares programming.


Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Control Synthesis with Formal Methods: Exploiting System Structure for Scalability

26 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, University of California, Berkeley, USA, on Control Synthesis with Formal Methods: Exploiting System Structure for Scalability

26 May 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

ABSTRACT: 

The field of formal methods has developed efficient techniques for the verification and synthesis of systems described by finite state transition models, such as computer programs and digital circuits. Leveraging formal methods to automate control synthesis for dynamical systems is an active and promising research area, but is hindered by two major problems: (1) the difficulty of abstracting a finite state transition model from a continuous dynamical model, and (2) when such abstraction is possible, the prohibitively large number of finite states that result even from a modest size continuous system.  In this talk we present two structural properties that help us overcome these problems. The first property is “mixed monotonicity” which relaxes the classical notion of an order preserving (“monotone”) system.  We will see how this property allows a computationally efficient finite abstraction and illustrate the result on a macroscopic model of vehicle traffic flow.  The second property is decomposability into sparsely connected subsystems. Using this property, we will exhibit a compositional synthesis technique that constructs a composite controller by introducing “contracts” between the subsystems.

BIOGRAPHY: 

Murat Arcak is a professor at U.C. Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department.  He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey (1996) and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1997 and 2000). His research is in dynamical systems and control theory with applications to synthetic biology, multi-agent systems, and transportation. He received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2003, the Donald P. Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in 2006, the Control and Systems Theory Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2007, and the Antonio Ruberti Young Researcher Prize from the IEEE Control Systems Society in 2014. He is a member of SIAM and a fellow of IEEE.


Guest lecture by Prof. Henrik O. Madsen, DTU, on how we can support the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through research and innovation

29 March 2016 13:15-14:00
Auditorium EL6, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Henrik O. Madsen, DTU, on how we can support the new United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through research and innovation

29 March 2016 13:15-14:00
Auditorium EL6, Gløshaugen

About the speaker:

Prof. Henrik Madsen has a broad experience from academia and industry. He has made significant contributions to research, industrial and societal development though his unique career from a university researcher to CEO of DNVGL with 16 000 employees.

He is currently serving the society for instance as a chairman of the main board of the Research Council of Norway and as a member of the United Nations Global Compact Board, the world’s largest voluntary corporate sustainability initiative.

  


Guest lecture by Prof. Kanna Rajan, NTNU, on NASA Spaceflight missisons: What goes on behind-the-scenes?

1 April 2016 12:00-13:00
Auditorium EL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Kanna Rajan, NTNU, on NASA Spaceflight missisons: What goes on behind-the-scenes?

1 April 2016 12:00-13:00
Auditorium EL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Assistant Prof. John Hedengren, Brigham Young University, on Ensemble Model Predictive Control for Managed Pressure Drilling

17 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Assistant Prof. John Hedengren, Brigham Young University, on Ensemble Model Predictive Control for Managed Pressure Drilling

17 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Abstract

With the recent advance in high speed data communication offered by wired drill pipe telemetry, several automated control systems directly utilize downhole data (e.g. vibration) to optimize drilling performance such as rate of penetration (ROP). With additional high-speed telemetry data such as pressure, it is possible to couple ROP and drilling hydraulics into a single controller for managed pressure drilling systems. This multivariate controller improves drilling performance during normal drilling operations and enhances safety during abnormal drilling conditions such as pipe connection procedures and with unwanted gas influx. These automation strategies rely on a foundation of stable and reliable measurements of critical drilling parameters. When high-speed telemetry to downhole measurements is unavailable then several automation applications degrade in performance, require use of soft sensors (predictive models), or revert to manual control. Incorporating the predictive capability of high-fidelity hydraulic and drill-string dynamic models into automation strategies is an active area of development. This presentation explores the intersection of varying degrees of model sophistication and changing measurement availability for managed pressure drilling automation. The objective is to maintain bit pressure within +/- 1 bar of the 400 bar set point during normal drilling operations despite temporary signal loss and poor data quality. Also, the bit pressure is held within +/- 5 bar of the 340 bar set point during a pipe connection procedure with no bit pressure measurements available to the controller. Additionally, the controller response to unexpected gas influx as a process disturbance is simulated. The ensemble approach is proposed to automatically switch between models and available measurements to achieve a higher degree of reliability and availability during common phases of drilling.

Short bio

John Hedengren is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Brigham Young University. He received a PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he developed the APMonitor Optimization Suite and worked with ExxonMobil on Advanced Process Control for 5 years. His current research interests include drilling automation, fiber optic monitoring, Intelli-fields, reservoir optimization, unmanned aerial systems, and model predictive control.  He is a principal investigator of the Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-UAS) and applies UAV computer vision and optimization technology to energy and infrastructure monitoring. He is a member of the DSAT (Drilling Systems Automation Technical Section) committee of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), focusing on accelerating automation technology in the well drilling industry and has been an invited panelist to discuss emerging topics in automation. BP, ExxonMobil, Hess, Astro Technology, Apache Corp, SINTEF, Schlumberger, NOV, IRIS, and others have been active collaborators of the BYU PRISM group in developing upstream telemetry and automation.


Guest lecture by Prof. Karl H. Johansson, KTH/NTNU AMOS, on the Role of Plant Model Information in Large-scale Control Systems

10 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Karl H. Johansson, KTH/NTNU AMOS, on the Role of Plant Model Information in Large-scale Control Systems

10 February 2016 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Advances in networked control systems have created new opportunities and challenges in controlling large-scale systems composed of several interacting subsystems. Many researchers have considered the problem of distributed control of such systems. However, at the heart of these control methods lies the (sometimes implicit) assumption that the designer has access to the global plant model information when designing a local controller. In contrast, in this talk we formulate and solve some distributed control design problems where the full plant model is not globally available. We investigate the achievable closed-loop performance of linear plants under a quadratic cost performance and give some fundamental bounds. We motivate and illustrate the results through applications in transportation and power systems.


Guest lecture by Adj. Ass. Prof. Ulrik D. Nielsen, DTU/NTNU AMOS, on new concepts for shipboard sea state estimation

27 January 2016 12:15-13:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Adj. Ass. Prof. Ulrik D. Nielsen, DTU/NTNU AMOS, on new concepts for shipboard sea state estimation

27 January 2016 12:15-13:00
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

The wave buoy analogy is a tested means for shipboard sea state estimation. Basically, the estimation principle resembles that of a traditional wave rider buoy which relies on transfer functions used to relate measured wave-induced responses and the unknown wave excitation. This paper addresses however a newly developed concept of the wave buoy analogy but the approach presented herein is, on the contrary, not relying exclusively on transfer functions. Instead, the method combines a signal-based part, estimating wave frequency, and a model-based part, estimating wave amplitude and phase, where only the model-based part depends on transfer functions whereas the signal-based part relies on the measured vessel response alone. Case studies in terms of hypothetical examples show that the method is capable to reconstruct fully the wave elevation process of a sinusoidal regular wave; which includes estimation of the wave's frequency, amplitude and phase, respectively. At this stage, the method is far from being a useful means in practical, real-situation applications but the method provides, indeed, a valuable step towards developing new approaches for shipboard sea state estimation.