News archive

For more news, see our blog, #NTNUmedicine

 


Beliefs battle hypertension

Bible(02.01.2012) As you are weighing whether or not to go to church services this Christmas, consider this: Does a belief in God confer any health benefits? With the help of a large Norwegian longitudinal health study called HUNT, researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) were able to find a clear relationship between time spent in church and lower blood pressure in both women and men.

 Beliefs battle hypertension.

Beliefs battle hypertension

Bible(02.01.2012) As you are weighing whether or not to go to church services this Christmas, consider this: Does a belief in God confer any health benefits? With the help of a large Norwegian longitudinal health study called HUNT, researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) were able to find a clear relationship between time spent in church and lower blood pressure in both women and men.

 Beliefs battle hypertension.

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Updated Mon, 05 Nov 2012 14:05:08 +0100

Temporal Changes in Resting Heart Rate and Deaths From Ischemic Heart Disease

Vatten, Janszky, Nauman, Wisløff(02.01.2012) People whose resting heart rate (RHR) increases over time may face an elevated risk of death from The Cardiac Exercise Research Group at NTNU. JAMA: Temporal Changes in Resting Heart Rate and Deaths From Ischemic Heart Disease.

Temporal Changes in Resting Heart Rate and Deaths From Ischemic Heart Disease

Vatten, Janszky, Nauman, Wisløff(02.01.2012) People whose resting heart rate (RHR) increases over time may face an elevated risk of death from The Cardiac Exercise Research Group at NTNU. JAMA: Temporal Changes in Resting Heart Rate and Deaths From Ischemic Heart Disease.

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Updated Mon, 05 Nov 2012 14:05:33 +0100

PhD candidate Emilie Vallée receives Best Poster award at MedIm conference

Emilie Vallee(19.12.2011) PhD candidates Emilie Vallée (NTNU)  and Judit Haász (University of Bergen) received prizes for Best Poster and Best Oral Presentation, respectively, at the annual MedIm Conference.

PhD candidate Emilie Vallée receives Best Poster award at MedIm conference

Emilie Vallee(19.12.2011) PhD candidates Emilie Vallée (NTNU)  and Judit Haász (University of Bergen) received prizes for Best Poster and Best Oral Presentation, respectively, at the annual MedIm Conference.

Nationwide collaboration is increasingly recognized as vital to the strengthening of PhD training in Norway. MedIm – Norwegian Research School in Medical Imaging, is promoting networks in medical imaging training. Hosted by the Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, this is a consortium between NTNU and the universities in Oslo, Bergen and Tromsø, with strong links to the university hospitals and SINTEF. MedIm receives funding from the Norwegian Research Council up to 2016.

 

Recently, the 3rd National PhD Conference in Medical Imaging was jointly organized in Oslo by MedIm and the Intervention Centre (Oslo University Hospital and University of Oslo). Seventy PhD candidates presented their research through posters or oral presentations.

 

Both the oral presentations and the posters were evaluated by scientific committees. Judit Haász (University of Bergen) was awarded NOK 10.000 for Best Oral Presentation. Haász argues that a precise description of brain morphology changes related to healthy aging is essential to promote our understanding of age-related cognitive changes, and that longitudinal studies have the advantage that the individual subject will function as its own control. The committee evaluated the level of presentations as very good, and ranked at second place was Daniel Høyer Iversen, MI Lab and Dept. of Circulation and Medical Imaging, for his presentation on model based correction of angle-dependencies in navigated 3-D flow imaging during neurosurgical interventions.

 

Emilie Vallée (Dept. of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU) won the NOK 5.000 Best Poster Award, for a project developed in cooperation with Live Eikenes and Asta Håberg (both at Dept. of Neuroscience, NTNU). The evaluation concluded that the poster not only presented important scientific results, but also represents a template for successful communication using the poster format. Her study poses the question 'Diffusion-weighted functional MRI: a new method for localizing brain activity with MRI?' Vallée demonstrates that the method of DfMRI does not have the necessary reliability to be used in brain activation studies, as earlier proposed by LeBihan and colleagues.

 

In addition to these prizes, MedIm awarded 14 Travel and Research Grants of NOK 50.000 each to PhD candidates from all over Norway, four of which are affiliated with NTNU. These are Siv Eggen (Dept. of Physics), Martin Denstedt (Dept. of Computer and Information Science), Páll Jens Erikson (Dept of Circulation and Medical Imaging) and Erik Andreas Torkildsen (Dept of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health). These grants were given on the basis of previously submitted applications.

 

The PhD conference attracted 130 participants. Ole Petter Ottersen, Rector of the University of Oslo, set the agenda with a fascinating full length lecture discussing the role that medical imaging can have in building ties between research and improved healthcare. Later, a panel including four deans (among them Dean Stig Slørdahl), MI Lab director Olav Haraldseth and Erik Fosse from OUS, agreed that cooperation in PhD training across institutional and disciplinary boundaries is crucial to the strengthening of future research in Norway.

 

The fourth MedIm conference will be held in Trondheim in November 2012. The event is increasingly seen as the number-one national meeting place for PhD candidates in the field of medical imaging.

 

Read more about MedIm

Updated Mon, 05 Nov 2012 14:04:21 +0100

Prevalence of acid reflux has almost doubled over the past decade

acid reflux(04.01.2012) The prevalence of acid reflux experienced at least once a week has almost doubled over the past decade, NTNU researchers report in a long term study of almost 80,000 people published online in Gut. Read more.

Prevalence of acid reflux has almost doubled over the past decade

acid reflux(04.01.2012) The prevalence of acid reflux experienced at least once a week has almost doubled over the past decade, NTNU researchers report in a long term study of almost 80,000 people published online in Gut. Read more.

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Updated Mon, 05 Nov 2012 14:06:01 +0100

Brain Waves and Mediation

Forget about crystals, candles, Eastern philosophy, and about sitting and breathing in awkward ways. Meditation research explores how the brain works when we refrain from concentration, rumination and intentional thinking. Electrical brain waves suggest that mental activity during meditation is wakeful and relaxed.

2010-03-19

Brain Waves and Mediation

Forget about crystals, candles, Eastern philosophy, and about sitting and breathing in awkward ways. Meditation research explores how the brain works when we refrain from concentration, rumination and intentional thinking. Electrical brain waves suggest that mental activity during meditation is wakeful and relaxed.

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer(30.08.2012) A new method for gathering tissue samples from patients having undergone prostate cancer surgery is giving researchers better tools for understanding the mechanisms behind the disease, which affects more than 4000 Norwegian men annually. With time, it could lead to better diagnosis and more targeted treatment.

Read more: Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer(30.08.2012) A new method for gathering tissue samples from patients having undergone prostate cancer surgery is giving researchers better tools for understanding the mechanisms behind the disease, which affects more than 4000 Norwegian men annually. With time, it could lead to better diagnosis and more targeted treatment.

Read more: Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

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It's no joke: laugh your way to retirement

A sense of humor helps to keep people healthy and increases their chances of reaching retirement age. But after the age of 70, the health benefits of humor decrease, researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have found.

2010-06-04

It's no joke: laugh your way to retirement

A sense of humor helps to keep people healthy and increases their chances of reaching retirement age. But after the age of 70, the health benefits of humor decrease, researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have found.

The study has just been published in the International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, and was composed of an examination of records from 53,500 individuals who were followed up after seven years. The study is based on a comprehensive database from the second Nor-Trøndelag Health Study, called HUNT 2, which is comprised of health histories and blood samples collected in 1995-1997 from more than 70,000 residents of a county in mid-Norway.

A positive effect
"There is reason to believe that sense of humor continues to have a positive effect on mental health and social life, even after people have become retirees, although the positive effect on life expectancy could not be shown after the age of 75. At that point, genetics and biological aging are of greater importance," says project leader Professor Sven Svebak at NTNU's Department of Neuroscience.

Svebak and his colleagues evaluated people's sense of humor with three questions from a test designed to measure only friendly humor. The test is not sensitive to humor that creates conflicts, is insulting or that is a variation of bullying, explains Svebak.

The questions revealed a person's ability to understand humor and to think in a humorous way, Svebak says. He believes there are many myths and misunderstandings about humor. For example, one myth is that happy people have a better sense of humor than people who are more serious.

"But it is not enough to be full of laughter, as we say in Trøndelag. Humor is all about ways of thinking and often occurs in a process or in dialogue with others. It does not need to be externalized," he says. "What people think is fun, is a different matter. Commonly, people with the same sense of humor tend to enjoy themselves together and can communicate humor without huge gestures. A twinkle in the eye can be more than enough." He adds that a sense of humor can be learned and improved through practice.

Health and mood
One possible objection to the research findings is that people who have the best sense of humor may believe that they are in good health and are therefore always in the best mood. This would mean that a good sense of humor only reflected a subjective sense of health and well being.

To ensure that their findings were genuine, the researchers studied the effect of sense of humor in two separate groups. One group was composed of people who believed they were healthy, while the other was composed of people who felt they were in poor health. But researchers found the effect of a good sense of humor was the same in the two groups.

"This gives us reason to maintain that sense of humor has a real effect on the health until people reach about 70 years old," says Svebak.

Two groups
The report shows that the size of health effect was dependent on how researchers grouped people with different scores. One approach was to divide the participants into two groups, one group that scored highest in terms of a good sense of humor and one with a low score. In this comparison, mortality was reduced by about 20 percent in people with high scores compared to people with low scores.

Another approach compared individuals with the highest and lowest scores using a nine-level scale. In this comparison, people with the highest scores were twice as likely to survive the seven year period of follow-up than those with the lowest scores.

Confirms previous findings
The results from the Nord-Trondelag County population confirm findings from a patient group that was studied in Sør-Trøndelag County. These results were published in the International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine four years ago.

That study, which was based on patients with chronic renal failure who were followed over two years, showed that survival was greatest among those with the best sense of humor. One objection to that research was that the findings could not be generalized to the population at large. The current study confirms those results for the first time in a large population.

Intelligence Test
Svebak said that it has been fifteen years since researchers first attempted to evaluate the effect of sense of humor on life expectancy. At that time, a group of American scientists published data on life expectancy in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

Their results were based on a personality survey of 10-year-olds conducted around 1920. The project was initiated by a pioneer in intelligence research, Lewis Terman, in California.

The children had to score above 135 on an intelligence test to participate. Over 1,200 children were involved. The results were surprising: Children with the least sense of humor were most likely to be alive 80 years later.

"But in this case, the children's sense of humor had been rated by the children's teachers and parents. They measured the social image of a sense of humor, while we measured self-image, and people's perception of their own sense of humor. There are also several other differences between the two studies that may affect the results," said Svebak.

The world's first
"Nevertheless, the results from the HUNT 2 are the first in history that say something about a sense of humor and health in a large population," Svebak notes.

The Humor Project has been conducted in collaboration with Solfrid Romundstad, PhD, now employed at Levanger Hospital, and Professor Jostein Holmen at the HUNT Research Centre.

 

15.09.2010

6th Research Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care

The global interest for research in palliative care is increasing rapidly and The 6th Research Congress of the EAPC reflects this with a record number of abstracts and attendees -- more than 660 abstracts from 39 different countries will be presented to over 1200 international researchers and clinicians.

2010-06-07

6th Research Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care

The global interest for research in palliative care is increasing rapidly and The 6th Research Congress of the EAPC reflects this with a record number of abstracts and attendees -- more than 660 abstracts from 39 different countries will be presented to over 1200 international researchers and clinicians.

Research to improve the care of patients with short life expectancy is a priority for governments in many countries. Large international collaborative research initiatives are beginning to bear fruit and a number of cutting edge studies will be presented in Glasgow. Highlights of the conference programme include:

  • Effect of genetics in cancer patients on their response to pain-killers like morphine
  • New strategies to avoid inappropriate transfers of terminally ill nursing home residents to hospitals at the end of life.
  • Mental clouding is prevalent in advanced disease but is an underestimated clinical problem. Helping clinicians to better understand its causes and management will improve the lives of patients and their carers.
  • Breathlessness is another common problem in advanced disease and associated with poor quality of life and shorter survival. Breathless patients need more attention, improved assessment and consequently better treatment.

The EAPC Research Network and the newly established European Palliative Care Research Centre will also be at the congress, presenting future research projects and an upcoming international PhD in palliative care.

More about the congress.

Regenerative medicine at NTNU

Regenerative medicine at NTNU (25.09.2012) Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today...

Regenerative medicine at NTNU

Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. On 3 October, 11 international speakers come to NTNU to discuss the latest developments in an open, one-day seminar.(25.09.2012) Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. On 3 October, 11 international speakers come to NTNU to discuss the latest developments in an open, one-day seminar.

Read the article here

Two new Centres of Excellence at the Faculty of Medicine

Norwegian Centre of Excellence logo(12.11.2012) The Research Council of Norway has given 13 research groups status as Centre of Excellence (SFF) from 2013. Two of these belong to the Faculty of Medicine (DMF): The Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) and Centre for Neural Computation (CNC).

The new DMF centres are led by Terje Espevik and May-Britt Moser.

Two new Centres of Excellence at the Faculty of Medicine

Norwegian Centre of Excellence logo(12.11.2012) The Research Council of Norway has given 13 research groups status as Centre of Excellence (SFF) from 2013. Two of these belong to the Faculty of Medicine (DMF): The Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) and Centre for Neural Computation (CNC).

The new DMF centres are led by Terje Espevik and May-Britt Moser.

Terje Espevik, leader of Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research

Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research

 

The centre will identify new diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. Research activities will lead to a greater understanding of how the body's inflammatory responses to disease are triggered and how the immune system is activated. Annual award: NOK 16.5 million. Project leader: Professor Terje Espevik.

 

May-Britt Moser, leader of Centre fo Neural Computation

Centre for Neural Computation


The objective of this SFF centre is to pioneer the extraction of computational algorithms from the mammalian cortex. Understanding the brain at the algorithmic level may have far-reaching implications, from the diagnosis and prevention of many neurological and psychiatric diseases to applications in the IT industry.  Annual award: NOK 17.5 million. Project leader: Professor May-Britt Moser.

The right choices

Dean at DMF, Stig Slørdahl, is both proud and happy on behalf of the Faculty of Medicine and NTNU.

"I'm incredibly proud and happy that we have won the competition to be awarded two Centres of Excellence at the Faculty, but also that NTNU was awarded four in total," Slørdahl says. "This shows that we have made many right choices in recent years, and not least that we have internationally leading research groups.

"The two groups at our Faculty are also important for our effort to maintain a leading university hospital in Mid-Norway, and that the NTNU profile is being highlighted by excellent research and education. The two leaders of the centres, May-Britt Moser and Terje Espevik, are fantastic, solid, and good researchers who will ensure further successes for NTNU."

New research adventures

The SFF-arrangement is one of the Research Council's main tools to promote high quality research. Ten years of SFF has changed the Norwegian research landscape and has significantly raised its quality.

"All our experience indicates that these 13 new centres will deliver research that makes a lasting impact for years to come," says Arvid Hallén, Director General of the Research Council. "They are already well-entrenched research groups; this long-term funding gives them the chance to make their mark in the forefront of international research." The director general is looking forward to seeing what this next generation of Norwegian Centres of Excellence will achieve."

 

The technology- and knowledge city of Trondheim

"This documents NTNU's outstanding research environment, and we wish to lift these pinnacles of international research further. This is also important for the technology- and knowledge city of Trondheim, which is already growing due to the ‘brain-power-stations' represented by our institutions in higher education, technology and research," says County Mayor Tore O. Sandvik to the newspaper Adresseavisen.

 

NTNU scientists have solved immune system puzzle

A scientific group at the Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine has made sensational findings which may affect cell biological science concerning the immune system.

NTNU scientists have solved immune system puzzle

A scientific group at the Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine has made sensational findings which may affect cell biological science concerning the immune system.

The title of the article is "The Rab11a GTPase Controls Toll-like receptor 4-Induced Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 on Phagosomes". Senior authors are Harald Husebye, Marie Hjelmseth Aune og Jørgen Stenvik. The leader of the group is professor Terje Espevik.

The results have been published today in the recognized journal "Immunity". 

 

 10.10.2010

 

Immune cell or cancer cell?

If AID mutates wrong genes, it could have serious consequences. (Photo: iStockphoto)(14.02.2013) IKM researchers have mapped how the mutation protein AID is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the immune system's B-cells, and have thereby come closer to an understanding of what happens when the protein fails and leads to cancer instead of targeted antibodies.

Immune cell or cancer cell?

— IKM researchers resolve the transport code for mutator-protein

If AID mutates wrong genes, it could have serious consequences. (Photo: iStockphoto)(14.02.2013) IKM researchers have mapped how the mutation protein AID is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the immune system's B-cells, and have thereby come closer to an understanding of what happens when the protein fails and leads to cancer instead of targeted antibodies.

Menno Witter-project awarded 13,7 million NOK grant

Professor Menno WitterThe Norwegian Research Council supports three ERCs Advanced Grants applications. Professor Menno Witter at the Faculty of Medicine, NTNU is behind one of the applications:" The Entorhinal Connectome: A Way to Read the Cortex". His project will receive 13,7 millon NOK over a four-year period.

Menno Witter-project awarded 13,7 million NOK grant

Professor Menno WitterThe Norwegian Research Council supports three ERCs Advanced Grants applications. Professor Menno Witter at the Faculty of Medicine, NTNU is behind one of the applications:" The Entorhinal Connectome: A Way to Read the Cortex". His project will receive 13,7 millon NOK over a four-year period.

The central hypothesis of the funded project is that variations in the architecture of the cortex, particularly in i) intrinsic wiring and ii) input connectivity, result in striking differences in function.

Comparable but different

- My current research suggests that the entorhinal cortex provides an optimal cortical network to address this challenge since it is essentially a ‘twin structure' where the siblings, called lateral and medial, have comparable architectures with variations in layer II, but show strikingly different functions, represented by the presence or absence of spatially modulated cells. We have previously shown the existence of grid cells in the medial ‘sibling' and the challence is to explain the absence of such cells in the lateral ‘sibling', says Professor Menno Witter.

Experimentally based rules on why and to what extent architecture causes function, with time, will i) be necessary to efficiently implement biologically inspired computer architectures and ii) significantly enhance the potential to predict the detrimental functional effects of architectural alterations that occur in a number of brain diseases, including dementia.

 Twin approach

The unique opportunity offered by the ‘twin approach' will allow establishing causal relationships between the architectures of multi-layered cortices and their functions and eventually lead to a theoretical framework (a set of rules) necessary to make reliable functional inferences on the basis of normal or diseased-altered network architectures

Updated Fri, 07 Jun 2013 13:32:20 +0200

Migraine among the most common causes of disability

The attention paid to migraine and other forms of headache is nowhere near what it should be, relative to the size of the problem. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Migraine is the 7th most common specific cause of disability globally – and it affects rich and poor alike, according to the world wide study Global Burden of Disease 2010 (GBD 2010).

Migraine among the most common causes of disability

The attention paid to migraine and other forms of headache is nowhere near what it should be, relative to the size of the problem. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Migraine is the 7th most common specific cause of disability globally – and it affects rich and poor alike, according to the world wide study Global Burden of Disease 2010 (GBD 2010).

Read more about migraine and disability at INM.

Key to cancer could be in cell division mechanisms

By studying how normal cells behave throughout the cell cycle one can understand the origin of cancer. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Researchers have come one step closer to understanding the origins of cancer by identifying genes that regulate cell division.

Key to cancer could be in cell division mechanisms

By studying how normal cells behave throughout the cell cycle one can understand the origin of cancer. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Researchers have come one step closer to understanding the origins of cancer by identifying genes that regulate cell division.

Read more about cell division and cancer at IKM.

Conference: Man in Extreme Environments

How do humans survive in the extreme environments, from the undersea world to the thin air atop the world's tallest mountains -- and beyond, into space? A two-day conference, "Man in Extreme Environments: Applied Physiology from Subsea to Space" brings experts from around the globe to explore the cutting edge research surrounding this fascinating topic.

Conference: Man in Extreme Environments

How do humans survive in the extreme environments, from the undersea world to the thin air atop the world's tallest mountains -- and beyond, into space? A two-day conference, "Man in Extreme Environments: Applied Physiology from Subsea to Space" brings experts from around the globe to explore the cutting edge research surrounding this fascinating topic.


Among the presenters at the conference are: 

Bengt Saltin (pending confirmation), University of Copenhagen, Denmark
ADAPTATION AND SURVIVAL AT HIGH ALTITUDE
A leading human physiologist who has devoted his life to researching the effects of physical exercise on health and performance. Saltin coined and proved the term ‘humans were meant to move' from the level of gene expression to heart and muscle function.

David Elliott, UK
IS SATURATION DIVING SAFE? FACTS AND MYTHS
The Civilian Consultant in Diving Medicine to the Royal Navy. The man behind the book "Bennett and Elliott's Physiology and Medicine of Diving", which is considered the "Bible" of diving research.

Steve L. Britton, University of Michigan, USA
AEROBIC CAPACITY IS THE MAJOR DETERMINANT OF THE CONTINUUM BETWEEN HEALTH
AND DISEASE
Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Professor of Molecular & Integrative Physiology with interest in aerobic capacity and its relation to health and disease.

Torkjel Tveita, University of Tromsø, Norway
EFFECTS OF HYPOTHERMIA AND REWARMING ON CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION
Professor and anesthesiologist who treats victims of hypothermia, including fishermen who have fallen into the frigid Norwegian waters and cross‐country skiers marooned in bad weather.

Michael A. Lang, Smithsonian Institution, USA
THE REVOLUTION OF SCIENCE THOUGH SCUBA
Director of the Smithsonian Marine Science Network. Expertise in polar science, diving physiology and promotion of underwater research. Lang is a 1991 DAN/Rolex Diver of the Year, 2008 AAUS Conrad Limbaugh Award recipient, 2009 DEMA Reaching out Award/Diving Hall of Fame member and 2010 NOGI for Science recipient.

The conference has been organized to honour NTNU Professor Alf O. Brubakk, who, as a professor in Environmental Physiology, has focused for the last 20 years on physiological responses to extreme environments and the development of biomedical instrumentation. His main activities have been related to decompression from dives or to altitude / space, comprising both experimental and clinical work.

Professor Brubakk has managed numerous research contracts from a.o. Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, Health and Safety Excecutive, UK, Norwegian Space Centre, Philips Petroleum, Statoil, Hydro, British Gas and the Norwegian Research Council. He has been awarded the Behnke Award by the Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society in 1995, and the Statoil Award for Scientific Achivement, Statoil Norway in 2001.

 

Location: Trondheim, Norway
Venue: Blåhø Auditorium, Øya Helsehus
Opening hours: 0900-1600 GMT
Ticket prices: lectures free; lectures and lunches NOK 1400; evening programme alone NOK 400

 

 
Contact: 
Svein Erik Gaustad
Tlf. 72828034  
Mobil: 920 56 552      

Media: 
Beate Horg
Tlf. 73 59 89 23
Mobil 412 11 821

 

15.11.2010

 

Developement agreement between NTNU and Bruker

Bruker has successfully installed two high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers for metabolic profiling at the new MR Metabolomics Laboratory at the university hospital campus.

Developement agreement between NTNU and Bruker

Bruker has successfully installed two high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers for metabolic profiling at the new MR Metabolomics Laboratory at the university hospital campus.

Metabolic profiling of tissue samples and biofluids has the potential to transform the way cancer diagnostics and treatments are optimized for individual patients. 
The new NMR systems will enable scientists at NTNU's Faculty of Medicine, working in partnership with clinicians at St. Olavs University Hospital, to investigate tissue samples and biofluids from patients taking part in studies, or from model systems of the same diseases. Researchers will use the NMR instrumentation for rapid, high-throughput analyses, aiming for characterisation, treatment planning and monitoring of cancer patients. The ultimate goal is to investigate whether this methodology can provide clinicians with more detailed diagnostic information that can improve treatment for an individual patient.

Read the Press Release at Bruker`s website.

 

08. 02. 2011

Annual report from MI Lab

MI Lab Read about MI Lab`s activities in the Annual report for 2010.

Annual report from MI Lab

MI Lab Read about MI Lab`s activities in the Annual report for 2010.

 

06. 05. 2011

Interval training can cut exercise hours sharply

-High-intensity interval training is twice as effective as normal exercise, said Jan Helgerud, an exercise expert at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. -This is like finding a new pill that works twice as well ... we should immediately throw out the old way of exercising.

2010-03-08

Interval training can cut exercise hours sharply

-High-intensity interval training is twice as effective as normal exercise, said Jan Helgerud, an exercise expert at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. -This is like finding a new pill that works twice as well ... we should immediately throw out the old way of exercising.

CP - risks and treatments

Illustration(11.09.2012) Every year 120 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) in Norway. The causes are many and complex, and there are also different methods for treating its complications. Researchers are now working on an overview of risk factors and treatment methods to improve prevention
and treatment.

CP - risks and treatments

Illustration(11.09.2012) Every year 120 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) in Norway. The causes are many and complex, and there are also different methods for treating its complications. Researchers are now working on an overview of risk factors and treatment methods to improve prevention
and treatment.

PhD-candidate Areej Ibrahim Elkamil at the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children and Women's Health (LBK), NTNU,
has looked at risk factors for CP, and how best to treat the complications connected to it.

Read the article CP- risks and treatments here