News archive

Climate Calculator for the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK)

IndEcol researcher Christian Solli has been engaged as an expert on CO2-emissions related to food and consumption for a TV reportage series in the science programme Schrödingers katt.

Climate Calculator for the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK)

IndEcol researcher Christian Solli has been engaged as an expert on CO2-emissions related to food and consumption for a TV reportage series in the science programme Schrödingers katt.

The series is following a family who wants to reduce their CO2-emissions by 30%. Solli has also developed a calculator that illustrates the CO2-emissions stemming from different types of consumption. Read more and try the calculator yourself at the NRK web site http://www.nrk.no/norge2020/

China’s growing CO2 emissions – a race between growth and efficiency

In 2006 China has overtaken the USA as the country with the highest global emissions. In a new analysis published in Environmental Science & Technology, Glen Peters and colleagues analyse the underlying causes of this growth in emissions.

China’s growing CO2 emissions – a race between growth and efficiency

In 2006 China has overtaken the USA as the country with the highest global emissions. In a new analysis published in Environmental Science & Technology, Glen Peters and colleagues analyse the underlying causes of this growth in emissions.

They find that urbanization and consumption growth are the most important contributors, and that increases in efficiency have been significant but not sufficient to offset the effect of economic growth.

Read more:
:: Press release (in English)
:: KLIMA
:: Original paper

New book illuminates the state's role in technological leadership

Illustrasjonsbilde/FOTOPostDoc Espen Moe's book “ Governance, Growth and Global Leadership: The Role of the State in Technological Progress, 1750–2000” focuses on the role of the state in promoting a country's long-term technological progress and industrial leadership.

New book illuminates the state's role in technological leadership

Illustrasjonsbilde/FOTOPostDoc Espen Moe's book “ Governance, Growth and Global Leadership: The Role of the State in Technological Progress, 1750–2000” focuses on the role of the state in promoting a country's long-term technological progress and industrial leadership.

Throughout history, a nation's rise to dominance has invariably been followed by its fall; the dominant powers of today are not the same ones that controlled the world three hundred years ago. In the same manner, economic dominance has usually been fleeting, as leading nations have routinely been caught up and surpassed by challengers. This study looks at Schumpeterian growth - currently the most important source of economic growth - which credits the ability to use technological progress for the benefit of industrial leadership as the key motor of national development and economic success.

Espen Moe has also been awarded the prize for best article 2006 in Norsk Statsvitenskapelig Tidsskrift [Norwegian Journal of Political Science] for a paper based on his book. The article employs comparative and historical methods to analyze the industrial growth experiences of nine countries in five core industries for five different time periods according to a theoretical framework combining Joseph Schumpeter and Mancur Olson. Amongst the conclusions drawn from the article is the negative long-term effects that vested interest groups may have on the economy, and the importance of a state that is able to implement economic and industrial policies independently of such groups.

You can also read an article about Espen and his work at forskning.no (national web site for popularized research) here (in Norwegian).

Fashionably green

Illustrasjonsbilde/FOTO The 5/2007 issue of Norway's oldest and largest women's magazine, Kvinner & Klær (KK), features a "How much do you pollute" calculator made by Nina Holck-Steen and Ann Iren Glimsdal. Nina and Ann Iren also contributed to a double page of "smart things to do to lessen your environmental burden".

Fashionably green

Illustrasjonsbilde/FOTO The 5/2007 issue of Norway's oldest and largest women's magazine, Kvinner & Klær (KK), features a "How much do you pollute" calculator made by Nina Holck-Steen and Ann Iren Glimsdal. Nina and Ann Iren also contributed to a double page of "smart things to do to lessen your environmental burden".

Nina is currently a master's student at IndEcol, while Ann Iren graduated last year and is now employed at Norsk Energi. The calculator is partly based on work Nina has done during her IndEcol Apprentice period working with a model developed by Post Doc Glen Peters.

An online version of the calculator is now being used by the Norwegian Broadcasting Network, NRK, in connection with a TV series on the future of the Earth "The Planet". One of Norway's largest news papers, VG, also published a similar "climate calculator" - however, most people score very low on emission of CO2 in it, giving people too good a conscience about their habits, Nina says.

Her results indicate that the consumption of products and services by one member of a Norwegian household results in the emission of 5 tons of CO2 per year, plus other climate gases of 1 ton CO2-equivalents per year. The sustainable level, however, is estimated to be only 1.1 tons. You can read more about this in the University Newspaper.

Strong interest in the Postgraduate School of Industrial Ecology

PhD students and young researcher have shown a strong interest in the Postgraduate School of Industrial Ecology (PSIE), a set of PhD-level research training courses supported by the EU and organized by a consortium of 11 European universities and ISIE. The project coordinators at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) received a total of 258 applications for individual courses from 65 young researchers.

Strong interest in the Postgraduate School of Industrial Ecology

PhD students and young researcher have shown a strong interest in the Postgraduate School of Industrial Ecology (PSIE), a set of PhD-level research training courses supported by the EU and organized by a consortium of 11 European universities and ISIE. The project coordinators at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) received a total of 258 applications for individual courses from 65 young researchers.

The applicants come from a wide range of countries, each gender is well represented, and the applicants in general seem to be very well qualified. Course participants have been selected and admissions letter are currently being mailed to the applicants. It looks like the EU-funded slots will be filled for the courses in life-cycle assessment, resource and recycling systems, and sustainable consumption. There are still self-funded places available in all courses, and funding may be available for PhD students who are European nationals for the courses industrial ecology, value-chain analysis, eco-design, and sustainable production. More information on PSIE is available at http://www.indecol.ntnu.no/psie.php or from psie(at)indecol.ntnu.no.

MSc student Kyrre Sundseth participated in an Experts in Teams group that developed plans for an aluminum plant with zero CO2-emissions. Hydro Aluminium found the project so interesting that they awarded it as the best student project. The students have been invited to present their ideas to the company at their production site in Årdal. Dowload the report here (in English). You can also read more about it in an article in Adresseavisen and on the Faculty news web pages (Norwegian only).

Making headlines - but no subtitles

Making headlines - but no subtitles Post Doc Glen Peter's work resulted in an headline in the newspaper VG. The article concerns the amount of CO2 an average Norwegian...

Making headlines - but no subtitles

Illustrasjonsbilde/FOTO Post Doc Glen Peter's work resulted in an headline in the newspaper VG. The article concerns the amount of CO2 an average Norwegian "releases" evey year including CO2 from the transportation and consumption of goods and services. However, the newspaper fails to mention exactly where its numbers comes from.

Indecol students receive prizes

Students honored: Lars-Petter Gundersen, Thor-Oskar Tømte, Kyrre Sundseth

Indecol students receive prizes

Students honored: Lars-Petter Gundersen, Thor-Oskar Tømte, Kyrre Sundseth

Bardal Foundation prize
Former IndEcol student Lars-Petter Gundersen was awarded the Bardal Foundation prize of NOK 10 000,- for his Master's thesis on how to design a component made of recycled polypropylene that can handle a large amount of mechanical stress.This is challenging since polypropylene has low impact resistance. Polypropylene is one of the most common plastic materials and is often used for packaging. The prize was presented at the IndEcol Council meeting 25 April . Read more in Universitetsavisa's article (Norwegian only).

Husbanken's prize
IndEcol student Thor-Oskar Tømte participated in the group that won the Husbanken's (the government owned Housing Bank) prize of NOK 12 000,- for the most energy efficient kindergarden. The project was a part of a Norwegian-Swedish contest between architect and civil engineering students from NTNU and Chalmers Technological University. Read more in Universitetsavisa's article (Norwegian only).

Hydro Aluminium award
MSc student Kyrre Sundseth participated in an Experts in Teams group that developed plans for an aluminum plant with zero CO2-emissions. Hydro Aluminium found the project so interesting that they awarded it as the best student project. The students have been invited to present their ideas to the company at their production site in Årdal. Dowload the report here (in English). You can also read more about it in an article in Adresseavisen and on the Faculty news web pages (Norwegian only).