Program in Innovation Management and Innovation Strategy

Schedule for PIMS Coursework

Course Session Resources Faculty Supporting Faculty »

Organizational Theory
and Behavior

Organizational Theory
15 - 18 okt 2012 -
Syllabus

Readings

Videos

Richard Harrison
The University of Texas

Alf Steinar Sætre

Organizational and Managerial Cognition and Behavior
6 - 9 nov 2012 -
Syllabus

Readings

Videos

George Huber
The University of Texas

Alf Steinar Sætre

Strategic Management
of Innovation &
Service Innovation

Strategic Management of Innovation
11 - 14 mar 2013 -
Syllabus

Readings Nicolai Foss &
Keld Laursen
CBS
Alf Steinar Sætre
Arild Aspelund
Service Innovation
15 - 18 april 2013 -
Syllabus
Readings Per E. Pedersen &
Per Kristensson
NHH
Arild Aspelund
Alf Steinar Sætre

Exploration & Exploitation

Exploration and Exploitation in Organizations
10 -13 jun 2013 -
Syllabus

Readings

Videos

Dovev Lavie
Technion
Alf Steinar Sætre
 

Innovation and Organizational Ambidexterity & Open Innovation
5-8 aug 2013 -
Syllabus-MT
Syllabus-HC

Readings-MT

Readings-HC

Michael Tushman
Harvard University
Henry Chesbrough
Berkeley
Arild Aspelund
Alf Steinar Sætre

Innovation, Learning and Change

Absorptive Capacity, Organizational Learning and Adaptation
26 -29 aug 2013 -
Syllabus
Readings Daniel A. Levinthal
Wharton
Alf Steinar Sætre
 
Innovation from a learning and Change Perspective
16 - 19 sept 2013 - Syllabus
Readings Henrich Greve
INSEAD
Arild Aspelund
Alf Steinar Sætre

Digital Innovation, Design Driven Innovation & Advocacy

Knowledge Management & Innovation in the Digital Space
2-4 april 2014
  Georg Von Krogh
ETH Zurich
Arild Aspelund
Alf Steinar Sætre

Design Driven Innovation & Advocacy of ideas
3-6 June 2014

  John A. Daly
University of Texas
Roberto Verganti Politecnico di Milano

Alf Steinar Sætre
Andre Liam

Teaming
& Disruptive Innovation

Teaming
12-14 May 2014

 

  Amy C. Edmondson
Harvard University
Endre Sjøvold
NTNU
Alf Steinar Sætre
Arild Aspelund
Disruptive Innovation
25-27 August 2014
  Clayton Christensen
Harvard University
Alf Steinar Sætre
Arild Aspelund

(PIMS courses build on prerequisite common courses)

Information for Current Students
 

1. Organizational Theory and Organizational Behavior

The first course in Organizational Theory and Organizational Behavior provides a baseline for understanding and studying innovation processes in organizations. This course is particularly important given that PIMS will have a diverse set of students not all of whom have been exposed to management/organizational research or even the social sciences.

2. Strategic Management of Innovation and Service Innovation

How firms create and capture value and innovation (e.g. IP strategy, open innovation). And on innovation in service industries such as healthcare, finance and design and also the increasing integration of service components with physical products to capture value.

3. Exploration and Exploitation

Deals with balancing short and long-term corporate survival through organizational ambidexterity and builds on and extends the discussions from Innovation Strategy.

4. Innovation Learning and Change

Focuses on how organizations learn and absorb new knowledge from the environment and adapt to changing circumstances. This course builds directly on the courses in Organizational Theory and Behavior and Exploration and Exploitation, and relates to the session on Innovation Strategy. The course in learning and change is inextricably linked to Knowledge and Creative Management.

5. Knowledge and Creative Management

This course deals with how organizations manage tacit and explicit knowledge to foster innovation; and, how organizations manage creative processes and how design can drive innovation.

6. Contexts for Innovation and Disruptive Innovation

Contexts for Innovation and Disruptive Innovation has two relatively independent topics. Contexts for innovation, discusses how various regions and localized social capital can impact innovation processes in firms. Disruptive innovation discusses how technologies initially serving low-end customers, through gradual innovation, can take over and disrupt whole industries.