News archive

Funding and award for prostate cancer aggressiveness research

The MR Cancer group has received funding for research into prostate cancer aggressiveness.(03.12.2012) The MR Cancer group at the MR Centre, NTNU, has received funding for a PhD on the topic "MR biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness" from the Norwegian Cancer Society.

Funding and award for prostate cancer aggressiveness research

The MR Cancer group has received funding for research into prostate cancer aggressiveness.(03.12.2012) The MR Cancer group at the MR Centre, NTNU, has received funding for a PhD on the topic "MR biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness" from the Norwegian Cancer Society.

The project will attempt to discriminate prostate cancer aggressiveness using a technology called MR Metabolomics.

Research scientist May Britt Tessem says: "We have demonstrated that high and low grade prostate cancer can be predicted based on MR spectra from prostatectomy samples and present for the first time spermine and citrate as MR biomarkers for aggressiveness. This project will therefore now focus on large patient cohorts for validation, using biopsies from our established biobank."

Poster prize

The MR Cancer group's work on this has already resulted in a poster prize at the 4th European Multidisciplinary Meeting on Urological Cancers (EMUC) 2012, where the group came third with the study "Metabolomics changes in citrate and spermine concentrations can predict prostate cancer aggressiveness." This was the first time spermine and citrate were presented as MR biomarkers for aggressiveness.

Making handheld ultrasound easier to use

Easy-to-use handheld ultrasound technology could lead to significant innovation and changed practices in the health care sector.(19.12.2012) Handheld ultrasound will become easier to use for general practitioners and in emergency medicine through further research and development of technological solutions, says the Ultrasound group at the Department for circulation and medical imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Making handheld ultrasound easier to use

Easy-to-use handheld ultrasound technology could lead to significant innovation and changed practices in the health care sector.(19.12.2012) Handheld ultrasound will become easier to use for general practitioners and in emergency medicine through further research and development of technological solutions, says the Ultrasound group at the Department for circulation and medical imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

The greatest barrier against more widespread use of ultrasound in pre-hospital emergency medicine and in primary healthcare is the lack of proficiency among non-specialists – both in terms of obtaining high quality images, and in interpreting the results.

Through more advanced technology the user will have access to real-time direct audio-visual instructions, automatic measurements of relevant physiological parameters and interpretation suggestions (computer aided diagnostics).

Mobile communication solutions using cloud computing will be developed further for efficient storage and communication with specialist health care services, designed for both emergency situations and normal consultations at the GP's.

Easy-to-use handheld ultrasound technology could lead to significant innovation and changed practices in the health care sector, where the goal is to offer patients quicker diagnoses and better follow-ups.

The NOK 40 million project is collaboration between the Ultrasound group, GE Vingmed Ultrasound A/S, Fimreite Software A/S, Stiftelsen Norsk Luftambulanse, and specialist in general medicine Lasse Folkvord, with support from the Research Council of Norway.

Asbjørn Støylen awarded for his heart ultrasound research

Professor Asbjørn Støylen(15.11.2012) ISB's Professor Asbjørn Støylen has received Ole Storstein's Award from the Norwegian Cardiologic Association (NCS) for his extensive contribution into ultrasound in heart research.

Asbjørn Støylen awarded for his heart ultrasound research

Professor Asbjørn Støylen(15.11.2012) ISB's Professor Asbjørn Støylen has received Ole Storstein's Award from the Norwegian Cardiologic Association (NCS) for his extensive contribution into ultrasound in heart research.

Støylen received the award at NCS' Autumn meeting in October, where he gave a lecture on the Measurement of regional myocardial function with ultrasound (in Norwegian – pdf).

Ole Storsteins's Award is an annual prize to a researcher making him/herself noted in heart research over time.

2012 Research Award to Eirik Skogvoll

Professor Eirik Skogvoll(25.10.2012) Professor Eirik Skogvoll at ISB will receive this year's 2012 Research Award from the Norwegian Society of Anaesthesiology for his outstanding research.

2012 Research Award to Eirik Skogvoll

Professor Eirik Skogvoll(25.10.2012) Professor Eirik Skogvoll at ISB will receive this year's 2012 Research Award from the Norwegian Society of Anaesthesiology for his outstanding research.

The award will be presented at this year's autumnal meeting in Tromsø on Friday 26. October, where Skogvoll has been invited to give the Otto Mollestad's memorial lecture.

The Norwegian Society of Anaesthesiology says in its award- justification:

"The Norwegian anaesthesiology research prize, the 2012 Research Award, is awarded to a researcher, a research group or a research environment that has been noted for its outstanding research. The award winner must, according to the statutes, be a leader within his or her field nationally, and be well known by leading international academic environments. The research committee has decided to give the research award for 2012 to Senior Consultant/Professor Eirik Skogvoll. Congratulations!"

"The award is both gratifying and surprising, and entails a clear recognition of clinical research at the integrated university clinic at St. Olavs/NTNU," says a pleased Skogvoll.

Minimizing diving risk in extreme environments

Michael Lang is currently looking at thermal protection for divers.(16.10.2012) With increasing activities in Arctic and Antarctic waters for scientific and commercial purposes, it is becoming ever more important to reduce the risks associated with diving in extreme environments. This has been the focus of a recently completed PhD thesis at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Minimizing diving risk in extreme environments

Michael Lang is currently looking at thermal protection for divers.(16.10.2012) With increasing activities in Arctic and Antarctic waters for scientific and commercial purposes, it is becoming ever more important to reduce the risks associated with diving in extreme environments. This has been the focus of a recently completed PhD thesis at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Michael Lang has investigated the physiological effects of diving in extreme environments and has reviewed the underwater performance of some of the equipment necessary to make such dives as safe as possible.

"Polar diving under ice, for example, is scientifically and politically interesting, yet presents a set of physiological, equipment, training and operational challenges," he says.

Lang, who was associated with the Smithsonian Scientific Diving Program and the National Science Foundation Antarctic Program in the USA, has looked at the use of enriched-air nitrox, the use of dive computers, ice-diving regulators and thermal protection of the divers.

In his study of the use of enriched-air nitrox as a compressed-gas breathing medium under pressure, Lang found that in certain depth ranges a higher fraction of oxygen (although not exceeding a PO2 of 1.6 ATA) and a lower fraction of nitrogen resulted in extended bottom times and a more efficient decompression. Furthermore, the use of nitrox was deemed to be at least as safe as compressed air.

Technological progress

Decompression status in extreme-environment diving can now be monitored efficiently through the use of dive computers. Lang found that dive computers are especially useful for multi-level, multi-day repetitive diving or decompression diving.

"Some dive computers also enable consideration of cold [temperatures] as a decompression stress risk factor, and their functions of ascent rate monitoring, real-time computation of nitrogen balances, air consumption monitoring and profile downloading capability form a solid, reliable basis for diminishing the probability of decompression sickness," Lang explains.

One part of diving equipment that sees extra strain in cold environments is the regulator. Special regulators have been devised for ice-diving, but some nevertheless freeze up. Lang expected performance to be brand specific and the findings confirmed that some had lower failure rates than others, but even the best of regulators can freeze up or fail under polar conditions.

Another factor for extending bottom times for ice diving is the use of thermal protection such as electrically heated drysuit undergarments, gloves and socks, and full face masks with dual second stage regulators and isolator valves. This is a subject of Lang's on-going research.

PhD thesis

MR method gives more breast cancer answers

Maria Tunset Grinde at the MR Center has shown that HR-MAS MRS and gene expression analysis reflect different characteristics of breast cancer.(18.10.2012) Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in Norway, and the search for new diagnostic tools and better treatments is continuous. Researchers at the MR Centre at NTNU have mapped the metabolic profiles of different types of breast cancer and hope that this can lead to better prognostic tools.

MR method gives more breast cancer answers

Maria Tunset Grinde at the MR Center has shown that HR-MAS MRS and gene expression analysis reflect different characteristics of breast cancer.(18.10.2012) Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in Norway, and the search for new diagnostic tools and better treatments is continuous. Researchers at the MR Centre at NTNU have mapped the metabolic profiles of different types of breast cancer and hope that this can lead to better prognostic tools.

Maria Tunset Grinde at the MR Center has in her PhD thesis shown that high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS MRS) and gene expression analysis reflect different characteristics of breast cancer.

"I believe that HR-MAS MRS, and HR-MAS MRS in combination with gene expression analysis, can become a tool in the future. Some patients do not respond very well to treatment – but why? Perhaps MRS combined with gene expression analysis can add extra information about this," Grinde says.

HR-MAS MRS

High resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS MRS) is a method for studying the metabolism in tissue samples. With traditional MRS the tissue must be extracted, but with HR-MAS MRS the tissue remains intact and it can therefore be used for other analyses such as histopathology and gene expression analysis.

13C HR-MAS MRS

With MRS one typically study signals from the protons, but it is also possible to look at the signals from other MR-sensitive nuclei such as carbon-13 (13C). 13C MRS is less sensitive than proton (1H) MRS as only 1% of the carbon isotopes are 13C. 13C-MRS is used mostly for metabolism studies of 13C-labelled metabolites such as glucose. The glucose is absorbed by the tumour cell and is transformed into lactate and alanine containing a 13C isotope.

Metabolites

Metabolites are molecules taking part in, or made from, the metabolism in the cells.

Xenograft models

Xenograft models are models where tissue or cells are implanted from one species (for example a human being) to another (for example mice). Most xenograft models used in cancer research are based on cell cultures. The xenograft models used in this study are based on tissue taken directly from breast cancer patients and implanted into mice.

Prognostic factors

The aim of the first of the three studies making up the thesis was to map the prognostic factors in breast cancer tissue with HR-MAS MRS and multivariate data analysis.

The researchers analysed 150 of 200 tissue samples from breast cancer patients to find the metabolic markers for oestrogen receptor positive and negative samples. The remaining 50 samples were used to test if the researcher would be able to categorise these correctly, based on the data from the first 150 samples.

"We did pretty well," Grinde says. "Of the 50 samples, we managed to place 44 in the right group. That means that HR-MAS MRS could be a method for classifying patient samples with different oestrogen receptor status, and that oestrogen receptor positive and negative samples have different metabolic profiles."

Labelled sugar gives answers

To map the metabolic processes of the aggressive breast cancer called basal-like and the less aggressive luminal-like, Grinde and the other researchers looked at the glycolytic activity – that is the transformation of glucose into lactate. The prognoses in the luminal-like model are usually better than with basal-like breast cancer.

The study is based on two different animal models, one for each of these two types of breast cancer, in which tumour tissue from breast cancer patients was implanted directly into the mice. The mice were given 13C-labelled glucose before the tissue samples were collected. The glucose had then been transformed into the metabolites lactate and alanine.

As expected, both tumour models had high glycolytic activity. In previous studies this has been associated with aggressive types of cancer. However, when the researchers looked at the amount of glucose left in the tumour cells, less glucose was found in the luminal-like breast cancer.

"The results were perhaps not exactly as we expected – and this means that glycolytic activity not necessarily is associated with aggressiveness.

The findings were confirmed by the gene expression analysis, which showed that most of the genes regulating glycolysis were higher expressed in the luminal-like samples.

"We thought it was quite interesting that there is a good correlation between the metabolites and the gene data. I think this is something that could contribute to finding potential targets for cancer treatments in the future," Grinde says.

Tissue samples give new results

In the third and last study, tissue from both breast cancer patients and xenograft models were analysed, with a particular focus on the choline metabolism. Choline metabolites play an important role in the synthesis of cell membranes and cancer cells typically have higher levels of cholines.

Previous cell cultures studies have indicated that choline and phosphocholine (PCho) are associated with aggressiveness. But in the samples from the xenograft models with human tissue, it looked as if it was rather glycerophosphocholine (GPC) which was associated with aggressiveness. The PCho/GPC ratio was high in the luminal-like models and lower in the basal-like xenograft models.

"It is interesting that there is a difference between cell culture studies and tissue. Cells in cultures often stem from a cancer cell that has been specifically grown, and adapted to that environment. Tissue from patients and these xenograft models are more heterogeneous as cancer tumours normally are."

Gene expression analysis on the tissue was also performed, which showed a good correlation between the choline metabolites and genes regulating choline metabolism. A very good correlation between the samples from the breast cancer patients and the xenograft models was also found.

Further research

The methods for analysing the metabolism in cancer cells are under constant development, and Grinde informs us that a method called hyperpolarised MRS is being tested clinically on prostate cancer patients in San Francisco. This method gives a signal strength which is 10,000 times greater compared to traditional 13C MRS.

"There is an incredible signal boost with this technique and it can be used to measure glycolytic activity in patients. This is something we will see more of in the future," Grinde believes.

Viva

Maria Tunset Grinde will defend her PhD thesis "Characterization of breast cancer using MR metabolomics and gene expression analysis" on 24. October 2012, at 12.15pm in the Auditorium ØHA11 at Øya, Trondheim. The trial lecture will be given at 10.15am at the same location.

Related publications:

Regenerative medicine at NTNU

Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. (25.09.2012) Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. On 3 October, 11 international speakers come to NTNU to discuss the latest developments in an open, one-day seminar.

Regenerative medicine at NTNU

Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. (25.09.2012) Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. On 3 October, 11 international speakers come to NTNU to discuss the latest developments in an open, one-day seminar.

Regenerative medicine is a field of medicine combining ‘traditional' medical research with advanced imaging technology, nanotechnology and biomaterials science. The aim is to regenerate or replace tissue, organs or cell populations in the body which have been damaged due to accidents or disease.

Regenerative medicine includes research for the repair of central nervous system injury such as spinal cord or stroke lesions, neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, as well as for the treatment of cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart, lung, skin, and bone conditions.

Translational success

"What I find quite exciting from my point of view as a researcher, is that there now seems to be much more integration between traditional medical research including cellular, molecular, genetic, biochemical and pharmacological methods and treatments, and  other disciplines such as advanced multimodal imaging technologies, biopolymer sciences and nanomaterials science technologies," says organiser and researcher Ioanna Sandvig.

"What we want to achieve with this meeting is to show how these different disciplines can be integrated to solve problems within regenerative medicine."

Open for all

The seminar is not only for researchers already active in regenerative medicine at NTNU. It is an open event which could be of interest to students looking for a potential research topic, active researchers, and clinicians and others working with patient treatment and rehabilitation.

The programme itself spans from basic research to clinicians' perspectives as to how the research can be translated into clinical practice and patient-specific treatments in the future.

The seminar is sponsored by NTNU's Internationalisation Grant 2012 and Thematic Area of Medical Technology, with co-funding from MI-Lab, Centre for Research-Based Innovation, and the Department of Neuroscience (INM).

Practical information

MR and MRS give better prostate cancer diagnosis

From left to right: (1) Anatomic MR image of a prostate gland with a tumour to the left. (2) Anatomic MR image with in vivo MRS spectra showing where in the gland each spectrum is taken from. (3) An example of an MR spectrum taken from an ex vivo tissue sample.(21.09.2012) Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in Norway, but so far the clinical diagnostic tools have not been able to say much about where in the prostate gland the cancer is, or its aggressiveness in individual patients. A new method developed at the MR Centre may give a clearer answer.

MR and MRS give better prostate cancer diagnosis

From left to right: (1) Anatomic MR image of a prostate gland with a tumour to the left. (2) Anatomic MR image with in vivo MRS spectra showing where in the gland each spectrum is taken from. (3) An example of an MR spectrum taken from an ex vivo tissue sample.(21.09.2012) Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in Norway, but so far the clinical diagnostic tools have not been able to say much about where in the prostate gland the cancer is, or its aggressiveness in individual patients. A new method developed at the MR Centre may give a clearer answer.

By combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with MR spectroscopy (MRS), PhD candidate Kirsten Margrete Selnæs has developed a method which helps localise cancer in the prostate gland, and how far the cancer has developed. The method can also give a clearer idea of how aggressive the cancer is, which is important with regards to treatment.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a method for imaging ‘slices' of the body through the use of radio waves and magnetic fields, which have no known harmful biological effects.

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a method for looking at the metabolism in cells and gives information about the cells' biological reactions.

Metabolites are molecules that take part in, or are made from, the metabolism in the cells.

Prostate cancer is a malign tumour in the prostate gland and is the most common form of cancer among men in Norway.

Measuring aggressiveness

"One of the problems in prostate cancer is to know who has an aggressive form and needs immediate treatment, and who can wait," Selnæs explains.

She used two different MR methods to answer the question of aggressiveness. First tissue samples from the prostate gland are studied outside the body (ex vivo).

The sample is run through an MR spectrometer which results in a spectrum – or metabolic profile. The researchers then look for values that are prominent in the aggressive cancer forms.

In the ex vivo tests the researchers found two possible biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness: the metabolites citrate and spermin.

Then the same test is done on patients in the body (in vivo), although this gives fewer details. Nonetheless, Selnæs found that the results from the ex vivo tests correlate to those done in vivo. This could lead to a more detailed diagnosis before a potential removal of the prostate gland.

"Until now we have not been able to differentiate the aggressive from the less dangerous cancer in the clinic. But we now hope to be closer to a method for differentiating between the two without having to operate," Selnæs says.

"With the screening programme for prostate cancer, many cases are discovered which will never develop into actual illness. But so far there has not been a method to confidently determine who will die from the cancer, and who do not even need treatment."

A detailed map

Selnæs has also compared the MRS results with MR images to get a detailed overview over where the tissue samples come from.

Normally when collecting tissue from the prostate gland, one takes a biopsy, and although it is known whether the sample comes from for example the right or left side of the prostate gland, one does not know any more details.

By combining MRI with MRS in vivo in the patient, it is possible to give the urologist more precise data for where the biopsy should be taken – the difference is akin to trying to navigate from a photograph compared with a map with precise GPS coordinates.

The way it is done is to use the MR images to identify suspicious-looking areas and then run MRS tests on these. If the MRS results also show a typical ‘cancer-result', it is more certain that it is actually cancer – there are more proofs.

To arrive at this result, Selnæs made us of a new method developed at the Institute for Laboratory medicine, Children's and Women's Health (LBK), where one can determine exactly where in the prostate gland the samples are gathered from. This enables the comparison of visual images from MR with the MRS results.

Further research

The research is in no way over although Selnæs has completed her PhD. The bio-marker results will be validated through larger patient studies, and an active monitoring study is planned with patients who according to clinical evaluation can wait with treatment.

"We will do an MR scan when they start the study, and after a year when they are back for their routine control. And we will look at whether there is something in the MR images or MR spectres that can tell us something about who should continue with monitoring," Selnæs explains.

Thesis defence

Kirsten Margrete Selnæs will defend her thesis on 25. September 2012 at 12.15 in the Auditorium at MTFS, St. Olavs Hospital.

In connection with the defence, there will be a pre-defence seminar on prostate cancer and MR the day before, on the 24. September.

Related publications

Prostate cancer and MR – seminar

Illustration/MR Cancer group(06.09.2012) The MR Cancer group at ISB welcomes you to a pre-defence seminar on prostate cancer and MR on 24. September 2012. 

Prostate cancer and MR – seminar

Illustration/MR Cancer group(06.09.2012) The MR Cancer group at ISB welcomes you to a pre-defence seminar on prostate cancer and MR on 24. September 2012. 

Presentations will be given by the internationally recognized researchers Dr Geoffry Payne (UK), Dr Agnes Katrine Lie (Norway), Dr Arend Heerschap (the Netherlands) and Dr Anders Angelsen (NTNU, Norway).

The pre-defence seminar is held in connection with the PhD thesis defence of Kirsten M. Selnæs.

The seminar takes place in LS42 (Laboratoriesenteret), St. Olavs Hospital.

Programme:

13.00-13.05 Welcome, introduction
13.05-13.25

"An introduction to functional imaging in the prostate and application to Radiotherapy Planning."

Dr. Geoffrey Payne, Dept of CR-UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey, UK

13.30-13.50

"Routine MRI using pelvic phased-array coil for detection of extraprostatic tumour extension: accurancy and clinical significance."

Dr. Agnes Katrine Lie, Dept of pathology, Norwegian Radium hospital, Oslo, Norway.

13.55-14.10 Coffee, tea
14.10-14.30

"Multi-parametric MR in cancer diagnosis"

Dr. Arend Heerschap, Dept. of Radiology, Radboud University of Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen.

14.35-14.55

"Prostate cancer research in Trondheim –present and future"

Dr. Anders Angelsen, Dept. of Urology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital

15.00 The End...

 

Half-day seminar on Systems Medicine

Illustration/PHOTO(03.09.2012) As part of the upcoming "Biotech and Life Science Programme" at NTNU, we have the pleasure of inviting you to a half-day seminar with participation from renowned international speakers on Friday 14. September 2012.

Half-day seminar on Systems Medicine

Illustration/PHOTO(03.09.2012) As part of the upcoming "Biotech and Life Science Programme" at NTNU, we have the pleasure of inviting you to a half-day seminar with participation from renowned international speakers on Friday 14. September 2012.

The seminar will focus on showing why systems medicine is likely to change how we do biomedical research and how we pursue clinical treatment of several diseases in the foreseeable future.

The seminar has the stated goal of pointing to a window of opportunity. No other Norwegian university possesses NTNU's unique competence profile to become an international player on the systems medicine scene. If the university succeeds in releasing its potential in pursuing theoretical-experimental biomedical research by combining its strengths in experimental medicine, mathematical modelling, data analysis, and design of instrumentation, this will most likely lead to better funding, better research and more fun. 

The seminar is thus highly relevant for a whole range of intellectual walks of life.

When and where:

  • When: Friday, September 14, 11.30- 15.15
  • Where: Seminarrom GSU1, St Olavs Hospital, Gastrosenteret, underetasje 1.

Programme:

11.00-11.30 Refreshments
11.30-11.45 Øyvind Ellingsen & Stig W. Omholt: Opening address
11.45-12.30 Peter Hunter: An overview of VPH/Physiome activities: A (bio)engineering opportunity
12.30-12.45 Coffee break
12.45-13.30 Nicolas Smith: Can a clinician learn anything from a computer model?
13.30-14.00 Olav Haraldseth: Medical Imaging - an important tool in physiology research
14.00-14.15 Coffee break
14.15-14.45 Klas Pettersen: Arterial stiffening explains age-associated hypertension
14.45-15.15 Øyvind Ellingsen (moderator): Discussion and concluding remarks

More information:

Programme and abstracts (pdf).

Heart disease no hindrance to high intensity exercise

Øivind Rognmo. Photo: NTNU/BERRE AS(30.08.2012) The risk of heart trouble during exercise does not increase with high intensity exercise, according to research form the Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG), NTNU.

Heart disease no hindrance to high intensity exercise

Øivind Rognmo. Photo: NTNU/BERRE AS(30.08.2012) The risk of heart trouble during exercise does not increase with high intensity exercise, according to research form the Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG), NTNU.

In a study with 4846 heart patients at three Norwegian heart rehabilitation centres, post-doc Øivind Rognmo found that the risk is not higher when doing high intensity intervals compared with low-intensity running.

The research article can be found here: Cardiovascular Risk of High- Versus Moderate-Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Coronary Heart Disease Patients. Rognmo et.al.

New biomarkers for cardiac risk?

CERG Logo(20.08.2012) In a study conducted at CERG, researchers have investigated possible biomarkers that could predict the risk of cardiac disease. The study is based on previous research showing that fitness levels (measured as maximal oxygen uptake) can predict future risk of dying from cardiac disease. 

New biomarkers for cardiac risk?

CERG Logo(20.08.2012) In a study conducted at CERG, researchers have investigated possible biomarkers that could predict the risk of cardiac disease. The study is based on previous research showing that fitness levels (measured as maximal oxygen uptake) can predict future risk of dying from cardiac disease. 

Read more about the biomarkers predicting the risk of cardiac disease on CERG's website.

Less use of opioids than feared

Illustration photo.(01.08.2012) Fewer Norwegians than previously suspected take opioids such as Paralgin forte and morphine regularly. Those who do, however, use these strong painkillers over extended periods, according to researchers at the Department for circulation and medical imaging (ISB).

Less use of opioids than feared

Illustration photo.(01.08.2012) Fewer Norwegians than previously suspected take opioids such as Paralgin forte and morphine regularly. Those who do, however, use these strong painkillers over extended periods, according to researchers at the Department for circulation and medical imaging (ISB).

Two-day seminar on bioinformatics

Foto: Geir Mogen, NTNU(23.07.2012) The Norwegian Bioinformatics Forum 2012 will be held on 18-19. October 2012 in the Laboratory Centre, NTNU, and will focus on computational aspects regarding bioinformatics in medical research and visualization. 

Two-day seminar on bioinformatics

Foto: Geir Mogen, NTNU(23.07.2012) The Norwegian Bioinformatics Forum 2012 will be held on 18-19. October 2012 in the Laboratory Centre, NTNU, and will focus on computational aspects regarding bioinformatics in medical research and visualization. 

Confirmed keynotes:

  • Carsten Daub - Translational research - Karolinska Institutet
  • Jean-Christophe Olivo-Marin - Quantitative Image Analysis Unit - Institut Pasteur

Invited speakers:

  • Biomedical imaging and visualization: Frank Lindseth, Hans Torp
  • Translational research: Anja Bye
  • Biotechnology: Steinar Engen, Olav Vadstein, Pawel Sikorsky, Pankaj Barah
  • Other: Stig Omholt - ISBE, Inge Jonassen - ELIXIR

Click here for more information and registration.

Diving group sees funding extended for four years

Ingrid Krüger-Stokke, Marianne Havnes og Andreas Møllerløkken(04.07.2012) The diving group at ISB has been awarded funding for another four years from the Research Council's PETROMAKS, as part of a commitment to research-based knowledge about HMS in the Norwegian petroleum industry.

Diving group sees funding extended for four years

Ingrid Krüger-Stokke, Marianne Havnes og Andreas Møllerløkken(04.07.2012) The diving group at ISB has been awarded funding for another four years from the Research Council's PETROMAKS, as part of a commitment to research-based knowledge about HMS in the Norwegian petroleum industry.

The award of NOK 10.8 million will support two research positions and a postdoc.

The funding will mainly be used for studies in animal models, which simulate saturation diving. Amongst other things, the group will look at how divers' fitness affects the cardiovascular system's reactions to diving, and whether the central nervous system is affected by the dust that arises during underwater welding under high pressure.

"The award has come at the 11th hour for us! Diving physiology has been part of the Medical Faculty's activities for about a quarter of a century, and when the Research Council evaluated the physiology subjects in 2011, the diving group was awarded the grade "good to very good". The activity has been deemed important to the Norwegian offshore industry, and the group has contributed key research internationally," researcher Ingrid Eftedal says.

"We had, however, got to a point where there were no more positions or funding left. With the funding from PETROMAKS, we can continue the research in collaboration with academic partners at ISB and internationally, and with industry-partners interested in diving."

Diving important to the Norwegian oil industry

Diving continues to be an important activity in the petroleum sector, and it is important to make sure diving is conducted in a safe manner with minimal health impact for the divers. White Paper 29 (2010-2011) and the Research Council's subject evaluation of physiology-related subjects (2011) made clear strategic recommendations on the importance of research into work-related illness and injury with regards to diving.

"It is therefore a pleasure to support the Medical Faculty at NTNU with research funding for physiological challenges in the hyperbaric working environment," says PETROMAKS.

The Applied Physiology Research Group's activities are centred around mechanisms and responses involved in the pathophysiology of diving and other activities that challenge the body's intrinsic potential for adaptation, and of how preventive measures such as exercise, hyperbaric oxygen pre-breathing or medical interventions may ameliorate the negative effects of diving and decompression stress.

"Fitness to dive – a translational approach to physiological challenges in the hyperbaric working environment" is one of 9 projects, which has received a total of NOK 54 million over five years from PETROMAKS.

Award to review article on postoperative pain

Photo: Illustration(18.06.2012) The Medical Association's publication Tidsskriftet has awarded the prize for the best review article to Olav Magnus S. Fredheim, Petter C. Borchgrevink and Gunnvald Kvarstein for an article on the treatment of postoperative pain in hospitals.

Award to review article on postoperative pain

Photo: Illustration(18.06.2012) The Medical Association's publication Tidsskriftet has awarded the prize for the best review article to Olav Magnus S. Fredheim, Petter C. Borchgrevink and Gunnvald Kvarstein for an article on the treatment of postoperative pain in hospitals.

Fredheim (ISB), Borchgrevink (ISB) and Kvarstein (UiO) received the NOK 30,000 prize at Tidsskriftet's annual meeting for its expert writers in April.

The jury, consisting of Are Brean, Cecilie Risøe and Guri Rørtveit, said:

"The article aims to give an overview over indications, effects and side-effects of central drugs and methods for the treatment of postoperative pain – and the authors are succeeding exceptionally well. The article is very relevant, also for doctors not directly involved in hospital-based palliation. The authors' backgrounds and the solid selection of literature lend weight to the article. The material is presented in a systematic, pedagogic and easily understood way. The language flows well and makes the reader want to read more. The article has few, but illustrative tables that are so well presented, one wants to cut them out and pin them up in the office."

Read more in Tidsskriftet (Norwegian).

Research award to Pål Klepstad for palliative care

Pål Klepstad was awarded the regional research award for 2011. Photo: Frode Nikolaisen, St Olav(15.06.2012) The Central Norway Regional Health Authority's Research Award 2011 has been awarded to Pål Klepstad for his efforts to promote knowledge about palliative care.

Research award to Pål Klepstad for palliative care

Pål Klepstad was awarded the regional research award for 2011. Photo: Frode Nikolaisen, St Olav(15.06.2012) The Central Norway Regional Health Authority's Research Award 2011 has been awarded to Pål Klepstad for his efforts to promote knowledge about palliative care.

Klepstad is Senior Consultant in Anesthesiology and Head of the Intensive Care Department at St Olavs Hospital, and Professor II at ISB.

Read more at St Olavs' website (Norwegian only).

Illustrasjonsbilde/FOTO

Contact information

 
Business address:
  • St.Olavs Hospital
  • Prinsesse Kristinas gt. 3
  • Akutten og Hjerte-lunge-senteret, 3.etg.
  • 7006 Trondheim
  • Norway
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Telephone:
+47 728 28 140
Fax:
+47 728 28 372
E-Mail:
isb-post@medisin.ntnu.no
Web:
http://www.ntnu.edu/isb
Opening hours:
0800-1545 (may-august 0800-1500)
Postal address:
NTNU, Det medisinske fakultet
Institutt for sirkulasjon og bildediagnostikk
Postboks 8905
7491  Trondheim
Norway
Delivery address:
  • NTNU/ISB
  • Heggstadmoen 51
  • Intern: Akutten og Hjerte-lunge-senteret, 3.etg. øst
  • 7080 Heimdal
    Norway