Sports, physical activity and leisure

This research area is concerned with sports, physical activity and leisure in individuals’ lives and in social development.

The Norwegian Confederation of Sports has more than two million members; almost all children and youth in Norway are members of the Confederation for a longer or shorter period. Most withdraw from organized sports activity during adolescence. There is a need for studies of why youths cease, alternatively continue their participation in sports, and also the conditions required for development of skills, for well-being and level of activity, and of how sports influence athletes’ values and behaviour.

Withdrawal from organized sports does not necessarily mean inactivity among youth; they continue to be physically active in new arenas. It is therefore also important to study physical activities other than the organized sports, activities organized by the children/youth themselves or by others than organisations.

It is also important to conduct studies of the social content of sport activities: relations between athletes, and between athletes and coach/teacher/activity leader. One relevant issue is the extent to which the activity leader supports autonomy or practice control, and how this influences the athletes/pupils.

Publications in English

Lagestad, P., Sæther, S. A. & Ulvik, A. (2017) Differences in coaching feedback between coaches of junior elite soccer players and junior amateur soccer players

Sæther, S. A. (2017): Characteristics of Professional and Non-Professional Football Players: “ An Eight-Year Follow-Up of Three Age Cohorts. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 2, 13-18.

Sæther, S.A. & Aspvik, N.P. (2017) Descriptive analysis of Objectively Assessed Physical activity among talented soccer players – a study of 3 Norwegian professional football clubs. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 2, 1-5.

Aspvik, Nils Petter; Viken, Hallgeir; Zisko, Nina; Ingebrigtsen, Jan Erik; Wisløff, Ulrik; Stensvold, Dorthe (2016) Are older adults physically active enough – a matter of assessment method? The Generation 100 study. PLOS ONE.

Nerland, E. & Sæther, S. A. (2016) Norwegian football academy players – Players self-assessed competence, Perfectionism, Goal orientations and Motivational climate. Sport Mont Journal, 2, 7-11.

Sæther, S. A.& Aspvik, N. P. (2016) Norwegian junior football players - player´s perception of stress according to playing time. Sport Science Review, 1-2, 85-96.

Sæther, S. A. (2016) Presence of the relative age effect and its effect on playing time among under-20 players in the Norwegian premier league Tippeligaen - a four year follow up. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 1, 11-15.

Catia Martins, Irina  Kazakova, Marit Ludviksen, Ingar Mehus, Ulrik Wisloff, Bard Kulseng, Linda Morgan and Neil King (2016): High-Intensity Interval Training and Isocaloric Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training Result in Similar Improvements in Body Composition and Fitness in Obese Individuals.   

Sæther, S. A. (2016) Presence of the relative age effect and its effect on playing time among under-20 players in the Norwegian premier league Tippeligaen - a four year follow up. Montenegrin Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 1, 11-15

Viken, Hallgeir; Aspvik, Nils Petter; Ingebrigtsen, Jan Erik; Zisko, Nina; Wisløff, Ulrik; Stensvold, Dorthe (2016). Correlates of Objectively Measured Physical Activity Among Norwegian Older Adults: The Generation 100 Study. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 2015.

Zisko, Nina; Carlsen, Trude; Salvesen, Øyvind; Aspvik, Nils Petter; Ingebrigtsen, Jan Erik; Wisløff, Ulrik; Stensvold, Dorthe. New relative intensity ambulatory accelerometer thresholds for elderly men and women: The Generation 100 study.  BMC Geriatrics 2015; Volum 15.