• Objects from a temporary memorial being collected by staff members from the State Archives in Trondheim, August 5 2011.

     

     

     

  • Exhibition of the proposals for national memorials, Oslo February 2014.

     

     

     

  • The damaged government building in Oslo February 2014. Here one of two national memorial sites will be located.

     

     

     

  • Model of the winning proposal by Jonas Dahlberg, exhibited in Oslo February 2014.

     

     

     

  • A spontaneously created temporary memorial on the pier to Utøya, May 2014.

     

     

     

  • Sign showing the chosen location for a memorial at Utøya, May 2014.

     

     

     

The project July 22 and the Negotiation of Memory studies the cultural afterlife of the terror attacks on July 22 2011 in the Norwegian society. The project focuses on the ways the tragedy is being represented and interpreted through temporary and permanent markers in public space.

The project gives special attention to the transition from the early phase, when the tragedy was processed through spontaneously created temporary memorials and unofficial markers, to the later creation of permanent and official monuments, memorials and sites commemorating the terror attacks. The relation between these two "stages of memory" is central to the project.

The project is owned by the Cultural Heritage Programme at the Department of Historical Studies, NTNU, and is financed by NTNU and the Falstad Centre


NEWS:

The Utøya Hegnhuset on list of top 10 buildings of 2016

Oliver Wainwright, the Guardian's architecture and design critic, regards Hegnhuset on Utøya as one of this year's architecture highlights: "A rare example of a memorial site of a terrorist attack handled without mawkish schmaltz or lurid sensationalism, the Hegnhuset on the island of Utøya makes a simple, powerful record of an event that shook the very foundations of Norway’s national identity. The cafe building, where Anders Breivik murdered 19 students before killing a further 50 on the island, has been retained as a stark relic, its walls sliced with Matta-Clark rawness, and encased in a simple timber and glass pavilion."