The winners of the 2014 Kavli Prizes were announced 29 May, and the award ceremony will take place in Oslo, Norway on September 9, 2014.

Kavli Prize Week Programme  8 - 11 September

The Trondheim Kavli Week Programme 10 and 11 September

 

2014 Kavli Public lecture


Wednesday 10 September

18.30 Students Society Building (Studentersamfundet)

Stanislas Dehaene  "The matter of education: Literacy, numeracy and the developing brain"

Seminars

Modelling and inference for dynamics in complex and disordered systems

A NETADIS-NORDITA meeting in honor of John Hertz' 70th Birthday
Organizers: Yasser Roudi, Mafred Opper and Peter Sollich
11-13 June 2014 - Albanova University Centre
Please find additional information here

2014 Kavli Prize Symposium in Neuroscience

11 September 2014 
Auditorium KBA in Women- and Childrens Centre

1400 Haim Sompolinsky, "Computational Perspectives on Neural Representations"
1430 Doris Tsao,"Mapping object representations"
1500 Nachum Ulanovsky, "Neural codes for 2-D and 3-D space in the hippocampal formation of bats"
1530 Break
1545 Eric Knudsen, «Brain Maps Controlling Attention»
1615 Dennis O'Leary,"Cortical maps: Regulation of area patterning"
1645 Round-up discussion and end of symposium

Nordic Neuroscience 2015

A scientific meeting for all neuroscientists in the Nordic and Baltic states. From June 10th to June 12th, 2015, the first Nordic Neuroscience meeting will be held in Trondheim, Norway. 

Meet fellow colleagues from your neighbouring institutes to explore, discuss and open for new collaborations. 

Program, practical information and other is found here.

Spitsbergen 2014: Neural Networks in the Arctic

Map with Stitsbergen area marked with an arrowAn open-atmosphere workshop that will explore how activity in complex neural networks gives rise to behaviour. Some of the world's very best researchers on neural networks and systems will gather to discuss fundamental principles of neural organization and function.

From 5-10 June 2014, we will host a neural workshop in Longyearbyen, on the island of Spitsbergen at 79 degrees North.

Programme, practical information and confirmed speakers

16th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Pico Caroni 28 June 2013

Title: Adjusting brain circuits for learning and memory I will provide evidence that the configuration of hippocampal and cortical Parvalbumin interneuron networks is adjusted in the...

16th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Pico Caroni 28 June 2013

Title: Adjusting brain circuits for learning and memory

I will provide evidence that the configuration of hippocampal and cortical Parvalbumin interneuron networks is adjusted in the adult upon learning, to enhance memory retrieval and support incremental learning. The underlying mechanism involves synaptic rearrangements in a specific VIP-PV interneuron microcircuit module.

Date: Friday 28 June 2013
Time: 14:00
Location: MTA, MTFS, Faculty of Medicine

15th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Barry J. Dickson 20 June 2013

Title: Sex circuits: the neurobiology of Drosophila mating behaviour Abstract: How are innate behavioral repertoires pre-programmed into the nervous system? And how are these innate...

15th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Barry J. Dickson 20 June 2013

Title: Sex circuits: the neurobiology of Drosophila mating behaviour

Abstract: How are innate behavioral repertoires pre-programmed into the nervous system? And how are these innate responses adjusted according to the individual's prior experience and current state? The mating behaviors of Drosophila melanogaster males offer a tractable genetic model system to address these questions. I will review current efforts to define the anatomy and function of neural circuity that generates male courtship behavior and female receptivity. Sexual dimorphisms sculpted into these circuits by the fruitless gene result in similar but distinct circuits in males and females, so that differential processing of pheromone signals in higher brain centers leads to dstinct behavioral responses in each sex. Specific elements of these circuits mediate learning in the adult male, so that he learns through experience to direct his courtship activity at the most appropriate target – the receptive virgin female.

Date: Thursday 20 June 2013
Time: 14:00
Location: MTFS, CNC/Kavli Institute, seminar room, 5th floor

14th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Mark Schnitzer 14 June 2013

Title: Visualizing the neuronal orchestra: Imaging the dynamics of large-scale neural ensembles in freely behaving mice. Date: Friday 14 June 2013 Time: 14:00 Location: MTFS,...

14th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Mark Schnitzer 14 June 2013

Title: Visualizing the neuronal orchestra: Imaging the dynamics of large-scale neural ensembles in freely behaving mice.

Date: Friday 14 June 2013
Time: 14:00
Location: MTFS, CNC/Kavli Institute, seminar room, 5th floor

13th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Sten Grillner 26 February 2013

Title: Neural Mechanisms underlying the selection of action – from microcircuits to behaviour. Tuesday 26. February 2013 Time: 14.15 - 15.15 Location: MTA, MTFS, Faculty of...

13th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Sten Grillner 26 February 2013

Title: Neural Mechanisms underlying the selection of action – from microcircuits to behaviour.

Tuesday 26. February 2013
Time: 14.15 - 15.15
Location: MTA, MTFS, Faculty of Medicine

12th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Charles F. Stevens 7 September 2012

Title: Maps and anti-maps in the brain. Friday 7 September – 14:00 Location: MTFS, CBM/Kavli, seminar room, 5th floor. Many regions in the brain can be classified as having either...

12th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Charles F. Stevens 7 September 2012

Title: Maps and anti-maps in the brain.
Friday 7 September – 14:00
Location: MTFS, CBM/Kavli, seminar room, 5th floor.

Many regions in the brain can be classified as having either a map or an anti-map. In maps, the location of active neurons tells you what type of information the neuron represents. For example, in the primary visual cortex, the position of an active neuron determines what information about the visual scene that cell carries (for example, its receptive field location, orientation preference, and characteristic spatial frequency).

A region with an anti-map is, in a sense, opposite because knowing the location of an active neuron is completely unrelated to the information the neuron represents. Indeed, in a region with an anti-map, the information available is distributed throughout the region, and this information can be recovered by measuring the activity levels of any neurons, irrespective of their position, if you look at some minimum number.

I will explain why anti-maps can exist and how they are generated, and will give an example – from the olfactory system – of the properties exhibited by a specific anti-map. Finally, I will say under what circumstances anti-maps are useful and suggest that, in addition to the olfactory system, they are present in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and perhaps other parts of the brain.

17th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Karl Deiserroth 25 November 2013

Title: Shedding light on the brain Karl Deiserroth from Stanford University will hold the 17 th Distinguished Kavli Lecture. Date: Monday 25 November 2013 Time: 09:15 ...

17th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Karl Deiserroth 25 November 2013

Title: Shedding light on the brain

Karl Deiserroth from Stanford University will hold the 17th Distinguished Kavli Lecture.
Date: Monday 25 November 2013
Time: 09:15
Location: MTFS, CNC/Kavli Institute, seminar room, 5th floor

11th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Giacomo Rizzolatti 15 June 2012

Title: How the actions of others are understood Friday 15 June - 14:15 Women and Children's Centre Olav Kyrres St. 11 (Øya) Auditorium KBA You see a stranger stub her toe...

11th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Giacomo Rizzolatti 15 June 2012

Title: How the actions of others are understood

Friday 15 June - 14:15

Women and Children's Centre
Olav Kyrres St. 11 (Øya)
Auditorium KBA

You see a stranger stub her toe and you immediately flinch in sympathy. You watch a child laugh and can't help but smile yourself. This ability to instinctively and immediately understand what other people are experiencing and to physically react has long baffled neuroscientists, psychologists,
and philosophers alike, but no more. The fascinating explanation: brain cells called mirror neurons.

Giacomo Rizzolatti was born in Kiev. He studied in Padua where he graduated in Medicine and Neurology. He received his training in physiology at the University of Pisa and in psychology at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. He has spent most of his scientific career at the University of Parma where he is currently Professor of Human Physiology.The main focus of Rizzolatti's research concerns the motor system and its role in cognitive functions. His research in the 1980s and 1990s led to the discovery of mirror neurons.

10th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Oscar Marín and Assistant Professor Beatriz Rico, 1st June 2012

Distinguished Kavli Lecture with Professor Oscar Marín and Assistant Professor Beatriz Rico on 1 June Professor Oscar Marín and Assistant Professor Beatriz Rico will give a lecture on 1...

10th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Oscar Marín and Assistant Professor Beatriz Rico, 1st June 2012

Distinguished Kavli Lecture with Professor Oscar Marín and Assistant Professor Beatriz Rico on 1 June

Professor Oscar Marín and Assistant Professor Beatriz Rico will give a lecture on 1 June 2012 at 13:00 and 13:45

Title: Assembly of cortical circuits

Medical-Technical Research Centre (MTFS)
Auditorium, 1st floor
Friday 1 June – 13:00

One of the major goals of neuroscience is to understand how brain function emerges through the assembly of specific neuronal circuits. This is particularly challenging for the cerebral cortex, where dozens, perhaps hundreds of different classes of neurons converge during development to establish specific microcircuits. In simple terms, complex brain circuitries such as those present in the cerebral cortex have evolved as hierarchical networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

In this joint lecture, Oscar Marín will present data on the mechanisms regulating the basic organization of the cerebral cortex. In particular, he will describe a novel mechanism that controls the even distribution of neurons in the developing brain. In the second part of this lecture, Beatriz Rico will summarize recent work on the molecular mechanisms controlling the wiring of specific populations of cortical inhibitory neurons. Specifically, she will describe how schizophrenia susceptibility genes influence the formation of inhibitory synapses, and how abnormal development of these connections disrupt cortical function.

9th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Linda Buck, 16th of March 2012

Professor Linda Buck from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will hold a lecture on 16th March 2012 at 14:30. Title: Deconstructing Smell How do...

9th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Linda Buck, 16th of March 2012

Professor Linda Buck from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will hold a lecture on 16th March 2012 at 14:30.

Title: Deconstructing Smell

How do we differentiate thousands of distinct odours and how do our brains perceive and remember them?

Humans and other mammals detect as many as 10,000 or more chemicals in the external
environment – but how do they actually do it? The brain must also translate
the detection of those into different smells, such as rose or garlic. Finally, pheromones
and other social cues elicit hormonal changes and instinctive behaviours
in animals. The illumination of the neural circuits underlying these effects may
ultimately provide clues to molecular mechanisms that influence basic drives
and emotional states in humans.

Linda B Buck won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her colleague
Richard Axel in 1994 for the discovery of odorant receptors and the organization
of the olfactory system. Buck used the odour receptor genes to figure
out how the identities of different odours are encoded at the molecular level
and in the brain to produce the perception of distinct odours. She is currently a
Member of the Basic Sciences Division at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
and an Affiliate Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of
Washington.

Location: Women and Children´s Centre, Auditorium, 1st floor.

8th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Michael Hausser, 9th of December 2011

Professor Michael Hausser from University College London will hold a lecture on 9th of December 2011 at 14:30. Title: Dendritic computation Abstract: The computational power of...

8th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Michael Hausser, 9th of December 2011

Professor Michael Hausser from University College London will hold a lecture on 9th of December 2011 at 14:30.

Title: Dendritic computation

Abstract: The computational power of dendrites has long been predicted using modelling approaches, but actual experimental examples of how dendrites solve computational problems are rare.
I will describe results from experiments combining patch-clamp recordings with two photon imaging and glutamate uncaging that demonstrate how the dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons can decode spatiotemporal sequences of synaptic inputs, and can implement different temporal coding strategies along single dendrites.

Location: MTFS, CBM/Kavli, seminar room, 5th floor.

7th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Carla Shatz, 16th of September 2011

Professor Carla Shatz from Stanford University, USA, will hold a lecture on 16th of September 2011 at 15:00. Title: Moonlighting Immune Genes and Brain Circuit Tuning during...

7th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Carla Shatz, 16th of September 2011

Professor Carla Shatz from Stanford University, USA, will hold a lecture on 16th of September 2011 at 15:00.

Title: Moonlighting Immune Genes and Brain Circuit Tuning during Developmental Critical Periods

Abstract: Major histocompatibility class I proteins and an innate immune receptor, both expressed in neurons, play an unexpected role in putting the brakes on synaptic plasticity.

Location: MTFS, CBM/Kavli, seminar room, 5th floor.

6th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Tobias Bonhoeffer, 8th of July 2011

Professor Tobias Bonhoeffer from Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany, will hold a lecture on 8th of July 2011 at 13:30. Title: How Activity Changes Synapses in the...

6th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Tobias Bonhoeffer, 8th of July 2011

Professor Tobias Bonhoeffer from Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany, will hold a lecture on 8th of July 2011 at 13:30.

Title: How Activity Changes Synapses in the Mammalian Brain

Abstract:
"One of the most fundamental properties of the brain is its ability to adapt rapidly to environmental changes. This is achieved mainly by changes in the connectivity between individual nerve cells. Synapses can be modulated in their strength by a variety of different mechanisms. We have investigated a number of these mechanisms, ranging from homeostatic control of synaptic efficacy to morphological manifestations of synaptic strengthening or weakening, and the role of calcium in these processes. Yet, while we are beginning to understand the cellular mechanisms underlying synaptic changes, it is important to consider the functional implications of synaptic plasticity in the intact brain. We are therefore applying new imaging methods to investigate the effects of experience on synaptic changes in cortical circuits. In particular, in vivo two-photon microscopy has enabled us to study morphological as well as functional plasticity at the level of individual neurons in the neocortex of anesthetized and lately also behaving animals. These experiments are beginning to close the gap between traditional cellular and systems studies, and they will enable us to obtain a much more comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon of synaptic plasticity and its role in cortical function and ultimately behavior."

Location: MTFS, CBM/Kavli, seminar room, 5th floor.

5th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Eric Kandel, 23rd May 2011

Professor Eric Kandel from Columbia University, USA, will hold a lecture on 23rd May 2011 at 15:00. Title: The Multiple Roles of Different Classes of Small RNAs in Regulating Memory...

5th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Eric Kandel, 23rd May 2011

Professor Eric Kandel from Columbia University, USA, will hold a lecture on 23rd May 2011 at 15:00.

Title: The Multiple Roles of Different Classes of Small RNAs in Regulating Memory Related Synaptic Plasticity

Abstract:
Small RNAs are a class of highly conserved, short noncoding RNAs that selectively and reversibly silence target mRNAs. In this lecture, Eric Kandel shows the importance of two classes
of small RNAs for precise spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression in synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

Location: Faculty of medicine, MTFS, Auditorium 1st floor.

Eric R. Kandel is an Austrian-born American neuroscientist who was a recipient of the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on the cellular basis of memory. Kandel will receive an honorary doctorate from NTNU on 24 May 2011.

4th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Assistant Professor Doris Tsao, 3rd of May 2011

Assistant Professor Doris Tsao from Harvard University will hold a lecture on 3rd of May 2011 at 15:00. Title: The neural machinery for processing faces Abstract: Tackling the...

4th Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Assistant Professor Doris Tsao, 3rd of May 2011

Assistant Professor Doris Tsao from Harvard University will hold a lecture on 3rd of May 2011 at 15:00.

Title: The neural machinery for processing faces

Abstract:
Tackling the problem of how the brain attaches a particular visual
form to a set of spots, curves, and shadings is incredibly difficult
due to the almost infinite number of possible forms, and the huge
cortical territory dedicated to encoding visual form. For making
headway into this problem, it would be ideal if there were a small
piece of brain specialized to encode a single visual form. This situation,
surprisingly, exists:functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals six regions
in the macaque temporal lobe and three regions in the frontal lobe that show
strongly increased blood flow in response to faces compared to images
of other objects. In my talk, I will discuss the properties of cells
within different face-selective regions, and how they lead to an
invariant representation of facial identity.

Location: MTFS, Kavli Institute/CBM, seminar room, 5th floor, south.

3rd Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Eric Kandel and Professor Denise Kandel, 9th of September 2010

Professor Eric Kandel and Professor Denise Kandel will hold a lecture on 9th of September 2010 at 12:30. Title: There is Life after the Nobel Prize: AMolecular Genetic. Approach to the...

3rd Distinguished Kavli Lecture - Professor Eric Kandel and Professor Denise Kandel, 9th of September 2010

Professor Eric Kandel and Professor Denise Kandel will hold a lecture on 9th of September 2010 at 12:30.

Title: There is Life after the Nobel Prize: AMolecular Genetic. Approach to the Gateway Hypothesis of Drug Abuse

Location: The Natural Science Building, Auditorium R1.