TEMAR (TErrestrial, Marine and Aerial Remote sensing for archaeology)

  • GPR Survey. Viking site at Frostating (Norway). Photo: Arne Anderson Stamnes / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet

     

  • GPR Survey Late Pre-Islamic site as Mleiha (UAE). Photo: Carmen Cuenca-Garcia / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet
  • GPR Survey. Iron Age site at Øya, Melhus (Norway). Photo: Arne Anderson Stamnes / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet

  • GPR survey. Viking Age burial mound at Herlaugshaugen Leka (Norway). Photo: Robert Fry
  • Magnetometer survey. Early Christian burial site at Veøy (Norway). Photo: Arne Anderson Stamnes / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet
  • ERT survey. Medieval church at Peter Egges Plass Trondheim (Norway). Photo: Arne Anderson Stamnes / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet
  • Deployment of the Hugin HUS AUV from our research vessel RV Gunnerus. Photo: FFI / NTNU AURlab
  • Hugin sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck (SASI data) at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: FFI / NTNU AURlab
  • Hugin sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck (SASB data) at Trondheim harbour -_late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: FFI / NTNU AURlab
  • Deployment of the ROV Minerva from our research vessel RV Gunnerus. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Minerva sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck, and track lines of the dynamic positioning system for precise data acquisition at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Minerva sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Minerva sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck (topo view) at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Minerva sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck (topo view_col) at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Minerva sonar image of the Munkholmen wreck (col) at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Interpretation of the Minerva sonar data of the Munkholmen wreck at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Minerva sonar image & overlapped interpretation of the Munkholmen wreck (col) at Trondheim harbour - late 17th-early 18th century. Photo: NTNU AURlab
  • Aerial view. Korsmyra excavation - Neolithic site at Bud (Norway). Photo: Raymond Sauvage / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet
  • Ortomosaic. Korsmyra Neolithic site at Bud (Norway). Photo: Raymond Sauvage / NTNU Vitenskapsmuseet

TEMAR is an emerging research group composed of experts in terrestrial, marine and airborne sensing technologies, working in archaeological applications and based at the NTNU University Museum.

We use, test and develop methods and advanced technologies in order to study and record buried, submerged or visible cultural and environmental assets in a non-destructive and minimally-invasive manner. In doing so, we apply the best survey strategies using sophisticated multi-sensor technologies to explore both the subsurface and submerged environments. Our breadth of expertise also includes staff with solid experience in physical and chemical characterisation of anthropogenic soil, geospatial and predictive modelling using GIS platforms, photogrammetry and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operation.

We are the first research group in Norway with the capacity to deploy from in-house both the expertise and technologies required to explore hidden cultural remains from the air, ground-surface or underwater. In close collaboration with NTNU’s cutting-edge research communities in engineering, we continually work to maximise cost-efficient survey methodologies and ensure high quality results.

Our main activities focus on the formulation and implementation of research projects in archaeological prospection in association with colleagues in the Department of Archaeology of the NTNU University Museum, and other national and international partners. Furthermore, we provide assistance to public and commercial stakeholders with interests in cultural heritage management and undertake commissioned work. We have extensive experience in high resolution and large-area geophysical characterisation as part of landscape or intra-site projects including the use of LIDAR and drone technology. Our versatile field experience spans from prospecting Nordic environments to Mediterranean and Middle East archaeological sites, covering a wide range of chronologies and types of features.

Methods

  • Terrestrial: Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) including stepped-frequency and pulsed systems, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) induction, earth resistance and magnetometry

  • Marine: Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), remotely operated vehicles (ROV) and unmanned surface vehicles (USV) deploying a range of acoustic and optical sensors

  • Airborne: Airborne laser scanning (LIDAR), unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV/drone) and aerial photogrammetry

Instruments

Terrestrial

  • 3D-RADAR GeoScope Mk IV GPR system with DXG-1820 ground coupled antenna array and towing trolley
  • GSSI Sir 3000 GPR system with option for 400 MHz or 900 MHz center frequency monostatic antennas
  • GF Instruments CMD-MiniExplorer multi-depth electromagnetic conductivity multi-coil meter
  • Allied Tigre 64-probe earth resistance meter for electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)
  • Bartington Grad601-2 dual sensor fluxgate gradiometer
  • Bartington MS2 magnetic susceptibility system with MS2B and MS2D sensors

 

Marine

  • Side-scan sonar (SSS)
  • Multibeam echo sounder
  • Synthetic aperture sonar (SAS)
  • Underwater stereo camera
  • Underwater hyperspectral imager (UHI)