Centre for Molecular Imaging at NT (MINT)

Research groups

Centre for Molecular Imaging at NT (MINT) is an interdepartmental collaboration between Department of Biology, Department of Biotechnology, and Department of Physics at the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Technology.

Biopolymers and Biomaterials

We are interested in understanding the barrier functions in extracellular biopolymer matrices (primarily mucus) to both large molecules and nanoparticles, and in technologies to alter these barrier properties to optimize drug delivery.

Biopolymers and Biomaterials

– Understanding and modifying barrier functions in polymer matrices

We are interested in understanding the barrier functions in extracellular biopolymer matrices (primarily mucus) to both large molecules and nanoparticles, and in technologies to alter these barrier properties to optimize drug delivery.

The primary techniques we utilize is FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) and MPT (multiple particle tracking, which we use to compare particle mobility in modified and unmodified extracellular biopolymer matrices.

Trajectories in native pig small intestinal mucus for 200 nm nanoparticles over 37 seconds. 

In A), the nanoparticles are functionally immobile whereas in B), the mucus has been treated with barrier modifying technology and the nanoparticles are mobile, changing position over time.

More information on the NOBIPOL website and the Compact website

Contact: Catherine T Nordgård

Biopolymers

Atomic force microscopy is applied for ultrastructure determination of various biopolymers, biopolymer assemblies and dynamic force spectroscopy.

Biopolymers

– Mesoscale structure formation and interaction

Atomic force microscopy is applied for ultrastructure determination of various biopolymers, biopolymer assemblies and dynamic force spectroscopy.

Interactions and adoption of higher order organisation of biological macromolecules are of fundamental importance in maintaining biological function and technological exploitation. Biophysics and Biopolymers

Contact: Bjørn Torger Stokke

Medical physics and technology

The overall aim of our research is to develop and improve diagnostic tools and to improve therapy. The research is primarily focused on cancer, but also arthrosclerosis and heart failure are studied. Improving diagnosis is done by developing new applications and methods, and characterizing new parameters based on molecular and medical imaging.

Medical physics and technology

The overall aim of our research is to develop and improve diagnostic tools and to improve therapy. The research is primarily focused on cancer, but also arthrosclerosis and heart failure are studied. Improving diagnosis is done by developing new applications and methods, and characterizing new parameters based on molecular and medical imaging.

Important methods are confocal and laser scanning microscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging. Improving cancer therapy is done by studying delivery of cancer specific therapeutic agents and how to improve the uptake and distribution of such agents; improving dosimetry in radiotherapy; study mechanisms of metastasis of breast cancer cells to bone.

Medical physics and technology

Contact: Catharina de Lange Davies

Fri, 27 May 2016 10:17:54 +0200

Experimental optics

Within experimental optics we are interested in spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging and polarimetric imaging of nanomaterials and 'soft' biological systems.

Experimental optics

Within experimental optics we are interested in spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging and polarimetric imaging of nanomaterials and 'soft' biological systems.

We develop new methodology such as time-gated Raman spectroscopy and Mueller Matrix Ellipsometers dedicated for materials with transparency ranges from the UV up to approx. 2 micrometers. Together with hardware development we put large efforts in signal processing of the wealth of information we obtain from such hyperspectral and polarimetric images.

More details of our lab infrastructures, research activities, research projects and researchers can be found at Applied physics.

Contact: Mikael Lindgren and Morten Kildemo


Basic neurobiology

The moth Heliothis VirescensWe seek knowledge about how the external world is represented in the brain. By studying the central olfactory pathways of a suitable model - the moth brain - we aim at understanding basic principles characterizing chemosensory information processing.

Basic neurobiology

The moth Heliothis VirescensWe seek knowledge about how the external world is represented in the brain. By studying the central olfactory pathways of a suitable model - the moth brain - we aim at understanding basic principles characterizing chemosensory information processing.

Invertebrate neuroanatomy has a strong tradition back to the end of the nineteenth century and many universal ideas of neuroscience have arisen from using insect model systems. The enormous repertoires of beauty and behaviour expressed among these small creatures are indeed reflected in the tiny insect brain. The extensiveness and diversity of insects have made them attractive objects for many researchers. Moths are able to detect olfactory signals with remarkable specificity and sensitivity. More than any other sensory arrangement that of smell has been conserved during the time of evolution. Thus, there are numerous striking similarities between the olfactory systems of insects and humans. By studying the neural pathways of the moth we aim to elucidate how chemosensory signal information is processed in the various integration centres of the brain. The methods used include imaging of individual neurons and neuronpopulations via confocal microscopy, combined with electrophysiology.

For further information; Nattsvermer gir svar på luktesansens hemmeligheter (forskning.no)  

Contact: Bente Gudveig Berg


Cell, molecular biology and genomics group (CMBG)

The model plant ArabidopsisOur research is relevant for some of the big challenges of today's society. It has relevance for food/feed production and security, human and plant health, bioenergy production, climate and the interaction between plant/algae and weather.

Cell, molecular biology and genomics group (CMBG)

The model plant ArabidopsisOur research is relevant for some of the big challenges of today's society. It has relevance for food/feed production and security, human and plant health, bioenergy production, climate and the interaction between plant/algae and weather.

We are aiming at understanding how cells and organisms deal with environmental conditions and their fluctuation, studying:

  1. Plant immune response and defense mechanisms, focusing on the role of glucosinolates and DAMPs (damage associated molecular patterns)
  2. Plant signaling and cell-to-cell communication, through secreted peptide ligands and different components of the transport machinery COPII.
  3. The response of plant and algea to stress factors like insects, bacteria, light or temperature
  4. Transgenic plant and algea lines for improvement of nutritional value and resistance to pathogens and pests
  5. The metabolic and regulatory systems in marine algea promising for feedstock

We are using models systems from plants, algea, insects and mammals in our research.

Visit our home page for more information; Cell, Molecular Biology and Genomics group (CMBG)

Contact: Atle M. Bones, Per Winge

 


Functional plant biology

Plant cell walls are essential elements of cell morphogenesis and interaction between the plant and the environment. They are amongst the most complex biological structure on the planet and therefore understanding the mechanisms regulating their formation and maintenance is still limited.

Functional plant biology

Plant cell walls are essential elements of cell morphogenesis and interaction between the plant and the environment. They are amongst the most complex biological structure on the planet and therefore understanding the mechanisms regulating their formation and maintenance is still limited.

The Hamann lab is interested in understanding the mode of action of the plant cell wall integrity maintenance mechanism, which is active during morphogenesis and response to biotic stress.

For additional information visit the Functiontal plant biology website

Contact: Thorsten Hamann

Mon, 28 Sep 2015 19:58:43 +0200

Bionanotechnology

Pint-sized nail bed: Into the oven goes a thin copper plate. Out come the needles that will force stubborn cells to take their medicine. Photo: Pawel SikorskiBionanotechnology is a branch of nanotechnology which uses biological starting materials, utilises biological design or fabrication principles or is applied in medicine or biotechnology.

Bionanotechnology

Pint-sized nail bed: Into the oven goes a thin copper plate. Out come the needles that will force stubborn cells to take their medicine. Photo: Pawel SikorskiBionanotechnology is a branch of nanotechnology which uses biological starting materials, utilises biological design or fabrication principles or is applied in medicine or biotechnology.

For additional information, visit the website Micro- and nanofabrication for studies of cells and biomaterials

Contact: Pawel Sikorski

Mon, 31 Aug 2015 14:00:25 +0200

Contact

Phone:  +47 73593669

Cellphone:  +47 91897851

Location

Høgskoleringen 5, Trondheim Realfagbygget B4-137

Address

MINT
Department of Physics, NTNU
NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway