Biophysics lunchtime seminar series

- Spring 2014

Division of Biophysics and Medical Technology at Department of Physics organizes a series of seminars related to the activities and interests of the division. All members of the academic community are welcome to attend and you may bring your lunch. Suggestions for speakers are encouraged; please contact the coordinators. Biophysics lunchtime seminar is open to everyone. You are welcome!

In order to finish in time (13:00) and have time for questions we urge everyone to show up and mingle a little before 12:15. You are welcome to bring your lunch.

Coordinators: David Bassett and Andreas Åslund


Seminars 2014

January 28

Tore Lindmo, Department of Physics
«40 Years in Less Than 40 Minutes»

January 28

Tore Lindmo, Department of Physics
«40 Years in Less Than 40 Minutes»

40 Years in Less Than 40 Minutes

The Friday colloquium February 14th is part of a seminar organized to honor Tore Lindmo who is retiring and becoming professor emeritus. From 14.15 to 15.00 two friends and former colleagues from the time at The Radium hospital will give a presentation about the development of flow cytometry and its use in cell kinetics studies.

Flow cytometry is a quantitative method measuring fluorescence intensity from cells on a single cell basis. Cells can be stained with several fluorescent dyes and the fluorescence intensity measured simultaneous from each individual cells and correlated. This technique is a powerful tool to study various aspects of cells. Cancer is due to uncontrolled proliferation of cells and it is of importance to understand the mechanisms of cell division and how a cell behaves in the various phases of its life. Flow cytrometry is very useful in this respect. 

Tore built the first flow cytometer at the Radiumhospital and later he and Harald Steen developed a microscope based version of a flow cytometer. Together with Erik Pettersen, Tore used his flow cytometer to learn more about cell kinetics and to study the effect of radiosensitizer on hypoxic cells which are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation. Today flow cytometers are commercial available and at Dept. of physics we have a flow cytometer equipped with 4 lasers and 10 detectors, making it possible to quantitate several cellular parameters simultaneously.

The talk will commence at 12:10 on Tuesday 28th January in auditorium R9 (NB! unusual room)

 


February 11

 Astrid Bjørkøy, Department of Physics
«Confocal applications using the Leica SP8 at the Center of Molecular Imaging at NT (MINT)»

February 11

 Astrid Bjørkøy, Department of Physics
«Confocal applications using the Leica SP8 at the Center of Molecular Imaging at NT (MINT)»

Abstract

Confocal applications using the Leica SP8 at the Center for Molecular Imaging at NT (MINT)

The focus will be on our new confocal Leica SP8 that was installed in 2013. We have not yet explored all possibilities of the SP8. This talk will give you a brief introduction to some of the applications and methods that might be of interest, including fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and high content screening.


Mon, 10 Feb 2014 12:06:33 +0100

February 25

Pål Gunnar Ellingsen, Applied optics at Department of Physics
«Novel imaging techniques for biological samples»

February 25

Pål Gunnar Ellingsen, Applied optics at Department of Physics
«Novel imaging techniques for biological samples»

Abstract

Novel imaging techniques for biological samples

This will be a presentation of my work with hyperspectral and Mueller matrix images. It includes novel methods for distinguishing the contributions from different dyes in a given pixel. The method presented, a correlation method, solves some of the problem with linear spectral unmixing, and enables statistical analysis of the results. Such a statistical analysis was done as part of my work in the LUPAS project.

Furthermore, I will present results obtained using our Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer, and especially a newly developed method for determining the 3D direction of collagen fibres. Lastly, I will give a brief description of the Raman microscope that NanoLab is acquiring.


Fri, 21 Feb 2014 10:21:23 +0100

March 25

Martin Hohmann-Marriott , Department of Biotechnology, PhotoSynLab
«How photosynthesis shaped our environment and vice versa»

March 25

Martin Hohmann-Marriott , Department of Biotechnology, PhotoSynLab
«How photosynthesis shaped our environment and vice versa»

Abstract

How photosynthesis shaped our environment and vice versa

Photosynthesis provides the main source of energy that sustains life on our planet. The processes that are involved in photosynthesis - light capture, charge stabilization and carbon fixation – occur over time frames spanning more than 15 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, recent thinking has proposed an intimate relationship between geological processes and photosynthetic organisms. How photosynthesis works from the molecular to ecosphere level is fascinating process to study.



Thu, 02 Jan 2014 15:11:23 +0100

Contact information

Coordinators Biophysics seminar

David Bassett
David Bassett

E-mail: david.bassett@ntnu.no

Andreas Åslund
Andreas Åslund

E-mail: andreas.aslund@ntnu.no

Biophysics seminar series