News archive

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When and how does CP strike?

Stoknes says the research team now wishes to continue with larger studies that look even closer at how different risk factors come together to contribute to brain injury which again causes CP.(25.03.2013) There is still great uncertainty surrounding the causes of cerebral palsy (CP), but new research suggests that the brain injury which leads to CP in infants with low birth weight occurs before they are born.

When and how does CP strike?

Stoknes says the research team now wishes to continue with larger studies that look even closer at how different risk factors come together to contribute to brain injury which again causes CP.(25.03.2013) There is still great uncertainty surrounding the causes of cerebral palsy (CP), but new research suggests that the brain injury which leads to CP in infants with low birth weight occurs before they are born.

In premature children the causes are often a combination of several risk factors; whereas in infants born at full term, it could be the child's inherent abilities to withstand unfortunate events at birth that cause some children to develop CP and others not.

Read more about the CP research at LBK.


Who would you want to represent you on the DMFs Board?

We are facing an election of a new DMF Board for the period 2013 - 2017. Permanent academic staff has 3 members, temporary academic staff and technical and administrative staff has one member each. Send your suggestion by 3 April. Three persons from the same group must stand behind the proposal.You will find the form for nomination and more details about the procedure on Innsida Web.

Who would you want to represent you on the DMFs Board?

We are facing an election of a new DMF Board for the period 2013 - 2017. Permanent academic staff has 3 members, temporary academic staff and technical and administrative staff has one member each. Send your suggestion by 3 April. Three persons from the same group must stand behind the proposal.You will find the form for nomination and more details about the procedure on Innsida Web.

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The Black Death wasn't dead – CEMIR looks at bubonic plague bacteria

CEMIR looks at the Black Death bacteria.(21.03.2013) Whilst digging in connection with a railways project in London, workers found a grave with 14 skeletons – most likely a mass grave from the bubonic plague also known as the Black Death. CEMIR and researchers from the University of Massachusetts will now look at the bubonic plague bacteria, which is still active.

The Black Death wasn't dead – CEMIR looks at bubonic plague bacteria

CEMIR looks at the Black Death bacteria.(21.03.2013) Whilst digging in connection with a railways project in London, workers found a grave with 14 skeletons – most likely a mass grave from the bubonic plague also known as the Black Death. CEMIR and researchers from the University of Massachusetts will now look at the bubonic plague bacteria, which is still active.

The full news story about the Black Death research can be found at Dagbladet.no (in Norwegian).


An Intricate Network: New Research Is Uncovering a More Complex Path for Memory

New findings reveal memory networks more intricate than previously believed. Understanding these pathways may help develop ways to enhance learning, mitigate memory disorders such as Alzheimer's or guard against memory loss from aging. The Kavli Foundation brought together three researchers, among them Professor Edvard Moser from The Kavli Instiute of Systems Neuroscience, NTNU, who have been integral to advancing our understanding of memory.

 

Kavli Foundation Roundtable Discussion with Professor Evard Moser:

An Intricate Network: New Research Is Uncovering a More Complex Path for Memory

New findings reveal memory networks more intricate than previously believed. Understanding these pathways may help develop ways to enhance learning, mitigate memory disorders such as Alzheimer's or guard against memory loss from aging. The Kavli Foundation brought together three researchers, among them Professor Edvard Moser from The Kavli Instiute of Systems Neuroscience, NTNU, who have been integral to advancing our understanding of memory.

 


Yasser Roudi recognized

Yasser Roudi with praeses Professor Kristian FossheimThe Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters has named NTNU's Yasser Roudi as the 2013 recipient of the Society's scientific award for young researchers (IK Lykke Fund). The announcement was made Friday, 8 March.

Yasser Roudi recognized

Yasser Roudi with praeses Professor Kristian FossheimThe Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters has named NTNU's Yasser Roudi as the 2013 recipient of the Society's scientific award for young researchers (IK Lykke Fund). The announcement was made Friday, 8 March.

Yasser Roudi, a group leader and scientist at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, is just 31 years old but has contributed significantly to the development of a new discipline – theoretical neuroscience. His work in this new field has been internationally recognized.
 

Roudi studied physics at Sharif University in Tehran – the leading technical university in Iran – where he completed his degree at the age of 20. He was then admitted to a doctoral programme at the International School of Advanced Studies in Trieste, the youngest in the institute's history. He defended his doctorate in 2005 as a 24-year-old. He has had a string of successes since, including the award of the prestigious Bogue Scholarship when he was a postdoc at the Gatsby Computational Unit at University College London, for collaboration with researchers at Cornell University. After 3 years at the Gatsby, Roudi moved to the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics in Stockholm and in 2010, took a permanent research position in theoretical and computational neuroscience at the Kavli Institute at NTNU.

Dual expertise

Professor Roudi is interested in understanding the basic principles of information processing in living organisms and machines. To further this understanding, he has worked across disciplines in ways that few others have done before. His work is rooted in quantitative and analytical methods that he has sometimes developed itself. He has shown how neural codes can occur as a result of interactions between thousands of nerve cells. The application of methods from theoretical physics to biological problems requires considerable insight into how biological mechanisms actually work. Yasser is one of very few researchers in the world who has the necessary dual expertise to do this kind of work.

Roudi has also been active in the development of neural network models and techniques for high-throughput data analysis. As a doctoral candidate, he solved a well-known problem in theoretical neuroscience, related to how neural networks can represent continuous and discontinuous variables at the same time. As a postdoc, he developed new models for network coding, and he changed established perceptions of how much information could be stored in realistic neural networks. In recent years, Roudi has been engaged in using methods from statistical mechanics for the reconstruction of biological networks from experimental data. This is a rapidly growing field with applications in neuroscience as well as genetics and machine learning. After his move to NTNU, he developed a new network model that explains how the grid cells in the brain's sense of location can occur in competitive networks.

International recognition

Yasser Roudi's research has been published in the most prestigious journals for theoretical physics. His latest models of grid cells have been published as two articles in Nature Neuroscience. He has given lectures at the world's most prestigious departments in theoretical physics and neuroscience, he has been a reviewer for leading journals, and he has organized several international workshops at NTNU and elsewhere in Scandinavia, where he has been able to get the strongest researchers in their fields to participate. Roudi is currently building a young and active research group that is working at the intersection of statistical physics and neuroscience. His work is funded by the EU, he is a mentor to both postdocs and PhD students, and he has hosted a number of foreign guest researchers. He is without a doubt a researcher who will contribute to NTNU's international reputation for years to come.

 

Anne Steenstrup

Menno Witter-project awarded 13,7 million NOK grant

Professor Menno WitterThe Norwegian Research Council supports three ERCs Advanced Grants applications. Professor Menno Witter at the Faculty of Medicine, NTNU is behind one of the applications:" The Entorhinal Connectome: A Way to Read the Cortex". His project will receive 13,7 millon NOK over a four-year period.

Menno Witter-project awarded 13,7 million NOK grant

Professor Menno WitterThe Norwegian Research Council supports three ERCs Advanced Grants applications. Professor Menno Witter at the Faculty of Medicine, NTNU is behind one of the applications:" The Entorhinal Connectome: A Way to Read the Cortex". His project will receive 13,7 millon NOK over a four-year period.

The central hypothesis of the funded project is that variations in the architecture of the cortex, particularly in i) intrinsic wiring and ii) input connectivity, result in striking differences in function.

Comparable but different

- My current research suggests that the entorhinal cortex provides an optimal cortical network to address this challenge since it is essentially a ‘twin structure' where the siblings, called lateral and medial, have comparable architectures with variations in layer II, but show strikingly different functions, represented by the presence or absence of spatially modulated cells. We have previously shown the existence of grid cells in the medial ‘sibling' and the challence is to explain the absence of such cells in the lateral ‘sibling', says Professor Menno Witter.

Experimentally based rules on why and to what extent architecture causes function, with time, will i) be necessary to efficiently implement biologically inspired computer architectures and ii) significantly enhance the potential to predict the detrimental functional effects of architectural alterations that occur in a number of brain diseases, including dementia.

 Twin approach

The unique opportunity offered by the ‘twin approach' will allow establishing causal relationships between the architectures of multi-layered cortices and their functions and eventually lead to a theoretical framework (a set of rules) necessary to make reliable functional inferences on the basis of normal or diseased-altered network architectures


Fri, 07 Jun 2013 13:32:20 +0200

Migraine among the most common causes of disability

The attention paid to migraine and other forms of headache is nowhere near what it should be, relative to the size of the problem. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Migraine is the 7th most common specific cause of disability globally – and it affects rich and poor alike, according to the world wide study Global Burden of Disease 2010 (GBD 2010).

Migraine among the most common causes of disability

The attention paid to migraine and other forms of headache is nowhere near what it should be, relative to the size of the problem. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Migraine is the 7th most common specific cause of disability globally – and it affects rich and poor alike, according to the world wide study Global Burden of Disease 2010 (GBD 2010).

Read more about migraine and disability at INM.

Key to cancer could be in cell division mechanisms

By studying how normal cells behave throughout the cell cycle one can understand the origin of cancer. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Researchers have come one step closer to understanding the origins of cancer by identifying genes that regulate cell division.

Key to cancer could be in cell division mechanisms

By studying how normal cells behave throughout the cell cycle one can understand the origin of cancer. (Photo: iStockphoto)(04.03.2013) Researchers have come one step closer to understanding the origins of cancer by identifying genes that regulate cell division.

Read more about cell division and cancer at IKM.

Immune cell or cancer cell?

If AID mutates wrong genes, it could have serious consequences. (Photo: iStockphoto)(14.02.2013) IKM researchers have mapped how the mutation protein AID is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the immune system's B-cells, and have thereby come closer to an understanding of what happens when the protein fails and leads to cancer instead of targeted antibodies.

Immune cell or cancer cell?

- IKM researchers resolve the transport code for mutator-protein

If AID mutates wrong genes, it could have serious consequences. (Photo: iStockphoto)(14.02.2013) IKM researchers have mapped how the mutation protein AID is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the immune system's B-cells, and have thereby come closer to an understanding of what happens when the protein fails and leads to cancer instead of targeted antibodies.

Early MRI important after traumatic brain injury

Non-bleeding lesions: Axonal injury to hemisphere (yellow arrow), axonal injury to corpus callosum (red arrow), and axonal injury to the cerebellum and brainstem (green arrow). (Photo: INM/NTNU)(21.12.2012) Early MRI gives better diagnosis of head injuries, according to research from the Department of Neuroscience (INM) at NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital.

Early MRI important after traumatic brain injury

Non-bleeding lesions: Axonal injury to hemisphere (yellow arrow), axonal injury to corpus callosum (red arrow), and axonal injury to the cerebellum and brainstem (green arrow). (Photo: INM/NTNU)(21.12.2012) Early MRI gives better diagnosis of head injuries, according to research from the Department of Neuroscience (INM) at NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital.

Read more about MRI after traumatic brain injury at INM.

Making handheld ultrasound easier to use

Easy-to-use handheld ultrasound technology could lead to significant innovation and changed practices in the health care sector.(19.12.2012) Handheld ultrasound will become easier to use for general practitioners and in emergency medicine through further research and development of technological solutions, says the Ultrasound group at the Department for circulation and medical imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Making handheld ultrasound easier to use

Easy-to-use handheld ultrasound technology could lead to significant innovation and changed practices in the health care sector.(19.12.2012) Handheld ultrasound will become easier to use for general practitioners and in emergency medicine through further research and development of technological solutions, says the Ultrasound group at the Department for circulation and medical imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Read more about handheld ultrasound at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging (ISB).

Mosers win Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize

May-Britt and Edvard Moser(18.12.2012) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has awarded the 13th Perl-UNC Neuroscience prize jointly to Edvard and May-Britt Moser.

Mosers win Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize

May-Britt and Edvard Moser(18.12.2012) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has awarded the 13th Perl-UNC Neuroscience prize jointly to Edvard and May-Britt Moser.

Predicting complications after heart surgery

The models were developed using patient data from approximately 5000 heart patients operated at St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim over the period 2000-2007. (iStockphoto)(07.12.2012) Predicting the risk of heart problems and the need for prolonged respirator treatment after heart surgery is now possible before the patient enters the operating theatre.

Predicting complications after heart surgery

The models were developed using patient data from approximately 5000 heart patients operated at St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim over the period 2000-2007. (iStockphoto)(07.12.2012) Predicting the risk of heart problems and the need for prolonged respirator treatment after heart surgery is now possible before the patient enters the operating theatre.

Read more about risk models for complications following heart surgery at the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health (LBK).

The many maps of the brain

Edvard and May-Britt Moser(05.12.2012) Your brain has at least four different senses of location – and perhaps as many as 10. And each is different, according to new research from the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

The brain has a number of "modules" dedicated to self-location.

The many maps of the brain

Edvard and May-Britt Moser(05.12.2012) Your brain has at least four different senses of location – and perhaps as many as 10. And each is different, according to new research from the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

The brain has a number of "modules" dedicated to self-location.

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Two new Centres of Excellence at the Faculty of Medicine

Norwegian Centre of Excellence logo(12.11.2012) The Research Council of Norway has given 13 research groups status as Centre of Excellence (SFF) from 2013. Two of these belong to the Faculty of Medicine (DMF): The Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) and Centre for Neural Computation (CNC).

The new DMF centres are led by Terje Espevik and May-Britt Moser.

Two new Centres of Excellence at the Faculty of Medicine

Norwegian Centre of Excellence logo(12.11.2012) The Research Council of Norway has given 13 research groups status as Centre of Excellence (SFF) from 2013. Two of these belong to the Faculty of Medicine (DMF): The Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) and Centre for Neural Computation (CNC).

The new DMF centres are led by Terje Espevik and May-Britt Moser.

Terje Espevik, leader of Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research

Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research

 

The centre will identify new diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. Research activities will lead to a greater understanding of how the body's inflammatory responses to disease are triggered and how the immune system is activated. Annual award: NOK 16.5 million. Project leader: Professor Terje Espevik.

 

May-Britt Moser, leader of Centre fo Neural Computation

Centre for Neural Computation


The objective of this SFF centre is to pioneer the extraction of computational algorithms from the mammalian cortex. Understanding the brain at the algorithmic level may have far-reaching implications, from the diagnosis and prevention of many neurological and psychiatric diseases to applications in the IT industry.  Annual award: NOK 17.5 million. Project leader: Professor May-Britt Moser.

The right choices

Dean at DMF, Stig Slørdahl, is both proud and happy on behalf of the Faculty of Medicine and NTNU.

"I'm incredibly proud and happy that we have won the competition to be awarded two Centres of Excellence at the Faculty, but also that NTNU was awarded four in total," Slørdahl says. "This shows that we have made many right choices in recent years, and not least that we have internationally leading research groups.

"The two groups at our Faculty are also important for our effort to maintain a leading university hospital in Mid-Norway, and that the NTNU profile is being highlighted by excellent research and education. The two leaders of the centres, May-Britt Moser and Terje Espevik, are fantastic, solid, and good researchers who will ensure further successes for NTNU."

New research adventures

The SFF-arrangement is one of the Research Council's main tools to promote high quality research. Ten years of SFF has changed the Norwegian research landscape and has significantly raised its quality.

"All our experience indicates that these 13 new centres will deliver research that makes a lasting impact for years to come," says Arvid Hallén, Director General of the Research Council. "They are already well-entrenched research groups; this long-term funding gives them the chance to make their mark in the forefront of international research." The director general is looking forward to seeing what this next generation of Norwegian Centres of Excellence will achieve."

 

The technology- and knowledge city of Trondheim

"This documents NTNU's outstanding research environment, and we wish to lift these pinnacles of international research further. This is also important for the technology- and knowledge city of Trondheim, which is already growing due to the ‘brain-power-stations' represented by our institutions in higher education, technology and research," says County Mayor Tore O. Sandvik to the newspaper Adresseavisen.

 

Brain tumour patients live longer with early surgery

MR of a low-grade glioma in the temple lobe(05.11.2012) Patients with brain tumour of diffuse low-grade glioma (LGG) type have a 14 percentage point greater chance of being alive after 5 years if they receive early surgery, according to a study at the Department of neurology (INM) at NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital, compared with a strategy of wait-and-see. 

Brain tumour patients live longer with early surgery

MR of a low-grade glioma in the temple lobe(05.11.2012) Patients with brain tumour of diffuse low-grade glioma (LGG) type have a 14 percentage point greater chance of being alive after 5 years if they receive early surgery, according to a study at the Department of neurology (INM) at NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital, compared with a strategy of wait-and-see. 

"This is an important study in brain surgery because there has been a controversy over what is the best treatment for this type of tumours. Treatment practice has therefore varied greatly both nationally and internationally," says last author Ole Solheim.

Read the article in full on INMs pages

Minimizing diving risk in extreme environments

Michael Lang is currently looking at thermal protection for divers(16.10.2012) With increasing activities in Arctic and Antarctic waters for scientific and commercial purposes, it is becoming ever more important to reduce the risks associated with diving in extreme environments. This has been the focus of a recently completed PhD thesis at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Read the article here

Minimizing diving risk in extreme environments

Michael Lang is currently looking at thermal protection for divers(16.10.2012) With increasing activities in Arctic and Antarctic waters for scientific and commercial purposes, it is becoming ever more important to reduce the risks associated with diving in extreme environments. This has been the focus of a recently completed PhD thesis at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging (ISB) at NTNU.

Read the article here

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Regenerative medicine at NTNU

Regenerative medicine at NTNU (25.09.2012) Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today...

Regenerative medicine at NTNU

Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. On 3 October, 11 international speakers come to NTNU to discuss the latest developments in an open, one-day seminar.(25.09.2012) Regenerative medicine is a hot topic in medical research as it could lead to treatments for conditions and diseases that today are incurable. On 3 October, 11 international speakers come to NTNU to discuss the latest developments in an open, one-day seminar.

Read the article here

CP - risks and treatments

Illustration(11.09.2012) Every year 120 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) in Norway. The causes are many and complex, and there are also different methods for treating its complications. Researchers are now working on an overview of risk factors and treatment methods to improve prevention
and treatment.

CP - risks and treatments

Illustration(11.09.2012) Every year 120 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy (CP) in Norway. The causes are many and complex, and there are also different methods for treating its complications. Researchers are now working on an overview of risk factors and treatment methods to improve prevention
and treatment.

PhD-candidate Areej Ibrahim Elkamil at the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children and Women's Health (LBK), NTNU,
has looked at risk factors for CP, and how best to treat the complications connected to it.

Read the article CP- risks and treatments here

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer(30.08.2012) A new method for gathering tissue samples from patients having undergone prostate cancer surgery is giving researchers better tools for understanding the mechanisms behind the disease, which affects more than 4000 Norwegian men annually. With time, it could lead to better diagnosis and more targeted treatment.

Read more: Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer(30.08.2012) A new method for gathering tissue samples from patients having undergone prostate cancer surgery is giving researchers better tools for understanding the mechanisms behind the disease, which affects more than 4000 Norwegian men annually. With time, it could lead to better diagnosis and more targeted treatment.

Read more: Closer to an understanding of prostate cancer

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