Faculty of Engineering Science and Technology

Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering


All great natural incidents show how small we humans really are when geological processes take effect, and just how important geological knowledge is in order to predict earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides and other geological events which affect humanity.
Norway is a land which is especially rich in natural resources such as oil, gas, metals, minerals and building raw materials. Exploitation of our geological resources in an environmentally responsible way is a prerequisite to a secure future for us and the rest of mankind.

News


Norwegian mining industry and engineering education celebrate 250 year jubilee

Looking back at the Mining seminar in Kongsberg in 1757, which it may be argued, started it all.

Norwegian mining industry and engineering education celebrate 250 year jubilee

Looking back at the Mining seminar in Kongsberg in 1757, which it may be argued, started it all.

The mining industry in Norway began with the royal silver mines in Kongsberg, creating the demand for technical expertise. An direct line can be drawn from the engineering degree programmes offered at NTNU to the Mining seminar in Kongsberg in 1757. The "Bergseminar" was replaced by the NTH degree offerings in 1910. Professor Einar Broch asserts that the Mining industry is more active that ever before, and emphasizes that geological engineering education is still vitally important.

These articles are available in Norwegian only.

Vacant Position

PhD position in Mineral Production – Rare Earth Elements IVT-23/13. Application deadline: 04.03.2013

PhD position in Mineral Production – Rare Earth Elements
IVT-23/13.
Application deadline: 04.03.2013

Vacant Positions

At the present moment there are no vacant positions avaliable at the Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering.

Vacant Positions

At the present moment there are no vacant positions avaliable at the Department of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering.


Rock Reinforcement — A potential goldmine

Charlie Li at the NTNU's Department of Geology and Mineral Resource Engineering, is developing a new bolt for rock reinforcement. The new bolt tolerates both high load and large rock...

Rock Reinforcement — A potential goldmine

Charlie Li at the NTNU's Department of Geology and Mineral Resource Engineering, is developing a new bolt for rock reinforcement. The new bolt tolerates both high load and large rock deformation without premature breakage. This means it can absorb significantly higher deformation energy than the conventional rock bolts. It is in this context that Charlie Li's invention is as simple as it is ingenious.

"If the bolt works as it should, it will significantly improve safety levels in mines and tunnels and reduce maintenance costs," says Li. "The industry is crying out for new energy-absorbent elements for rock reinforcement, and hopefully that is what we have," smiles Professor Charlie Li knowledgably.

The invention in question is a new type of bolt for rock reinforcement. The most common method for securing mines and tunnels against rock fall is to install bolts in the country rock. For the maximum benefit to safety such a bolt should be able to tolerate both high load and large deformation in highly stressed rock masses. None of the conventional types of bolts currently in use possess both these properties.

D-bolt

The invention has been given the name "D-bolt", which stands for deformable-bolt. Laboratory testing has given impressive results, but it will be first in the summer of 2008 that Li will be able to get clear confirmation of just how good the invention is.

"We are about to test 50 D-bolts in a mine in Sweden where the condition of the rock is really poor. In such a severe environment, the bolts would be subjected to significantly large rock deformation in a short period of time. The recorded measurements will show how the bolt functions in a real underground mine environment," explains Li – who tells us that he is really excited about the results.

Collaboration

Li has worked with rock reinforcement for over 15 years, both at the Luleå University of Technology in Sweden and in the Boliden Mineral mining company, as well as at NTNU since 2004. It was his colleagues at NTNU and in the industry who advised Li to patent protect the invention.

Contact information

Source material / Additional reading

  1. Byter stål (pdf) SINTEF Bransjenyheter