Department of Physics

Physics is the foundation for natural sciences, and also has practical implications for our everyday lives. In fact, modern life is dominated by technological developments based on discoveries in physics, from ultra-fast computers to renewable energy technologies.

Our research spans a broad spectrum of natural sciences and technology, which in turn allows us to offer an education that provides a solid basis for future careers. Physics research is carried out in experimental as well as theoretical fields, often across conventional boundaries between disciplines. Our central research areas are materials science, nanoscience, surface physics, modern optics, astrophysics, solar energy, biophysics, and medical technology. Research staff at the institute make a special effort to increase the awareness and understanding of the importance and impact of physics in our society.

Department of Physics currently employs about 180 people. On average, about 2000 NTNU students a year take Physics courses.


Events

Jacob Linder selected for NTNU's Outstanding Academic Fellows Programme

Jacob Linder, professor at Department of Physics16.06. 2014
Jacob Linder, professor at Department of Physics, is one of 17 young scientists the Rectorate has chosen to join the The NTNU Outstanding Academic Fellows Programme. The program is designed to give the young researchers opportunity to grow their careers.

Jacob Linder selected for NTNU's Outstanding Academic Fellows Programme

Jacob Linder, professor at Department of Physics16.06. 2014
Jacob Linder, professor at Department of Physics, is one of 17 young scientists the Rectorate has chosen to join the The NTNU Outstanding Academic Fellows Programme. The program is designed to give the young researchers opportunity to grow their careers.

The goal of the program is that participants will be supported to build leading research careers and compete for an ERC Grants (European Research Council) during the period. The program is a pilot for the period 2014-2017. With the support of international mentors, research visits, get-togethers, money and the expertise of the Norwegian Olympic Committee in talent development, the fellows will have the opportunity to improve their competitiveness in the international research world.

Department of physics congratulates Jacob with the the selection and award

More on NTNU's Outstanding Academic Fellows


Mon, 16 Jun 2014 19:56:06 +0200

Rajesh Kumar selected for SPIE scholarship award

Rajesh Kumar. Photo: M. Lilledahl11.06. 2014
Rajesh Kumar has been awarded 2014 Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship by SPIE, for his potential contributions to the field of optics, photonics or related field. In award, he will receive a Certificate and $ 2000. This amount can be used to pursue educational and career goals in optics and photonics or related field. Department of Physics congratulates Rajesh with the honorable award.

Rajesh Kumar selected for SPIE scholarship award

Rajesh Kumar. Photo: M. Lilledahl11.06. 2014
Rajesh Kumar has been awarded 2014 Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship by SPIE, for his potential contributions to the field of optics, photonics or related field. In award, he will receive a Certificate and $ 2000. This amount can be used to pursue educational and career goals in optics and photonics or related field. Department of Physics congratulates Rajesh with the honorable award.

Rajesh Kumar is a Research Fellow at Department of Physics (NTNU). He is daily working at the Division of Biophysics and medical technology in the research group Clinical applications of multiphoton microscopy.

SPIE Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship

Rajesh Kumar has been awarded a 2014 Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics for his potential contributions to the field of optics, photonics or related field.

His current research interest in cludes the application of optics and photonics in medical science. His work is focused on diagnosis of bone/cartilage disease (Osteoarthritis) and cancer. He obtained MSc degree in Photonics and previously worked in the area of medical photonics device for a couple of years as Marie-Curie Researcher in the EU/FP7 funded project on integrated interventional imaging operating system in the United Kingdom. He has worked as visiting student research fellow at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU-South Korea), Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR-Mumbai), Indian Institute of Technology (IIT-Madras) and Indian Institute of Science (IISc-Bangalore). He is an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA), UK.

SPIEBellingham, Washington, USA 6. June 2014

The press release from SPIE

Rajesh Kumar, Research Fellow at Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)


Thu, 12 Jun 2014 10:56:22 +0200

Small capsules, big potential

Physicists Paul Dommersnes, University of Paris, Diderot (left) and Jon Otto Fossum (NTNU), have come up with a way to make a novel capsule that could have wide applications in medicine and industry. Photo: Per Harald Olsen10.06. 2014
Physicists Paul Dommersnes at University of Paris, Diderot and Jon Otto Fossum at NTNU, have come up with a way to make a novel capsule that could have wide applications in medicine and industry.

Small capsules, big potential

Physicists Paul Dommersnes, University of Paris, Diderot (left) and Jon Otto Fossum (NTNU), have come up with a way to make a novel capsule that could have wide applications in medicine and industry. Photo: Per Harald Olsen10.06. 2014
Physicists Paul Dommersnes at University of Paris, Diderot and Jon Otto Fossum at NTNU, have come up with a way to make a novel capsule that could have wide applications in medicine and industry.

A conversation between two physicists in a Paris café led to the invention of a novel form of capsules that could be used in medicine, food, household products, cosmetics and paints. Their find has just been published in the latest issue of Nature Communications.

More on Small capsules, big potential (Gemini, 02.06.2014)

Kapsler gjør verden mykere  (forskning.no, 22.06.2014)

Stort norsk gjennombrudd innen ørsmå selvbyggende kapsler (Teknisk Ukeblad, 27.05.2014)


Tue, 24 Jun 2014 12:01:29 +0200

Killing cancer cells with super glue

The picture shows cells that have taken up nanoparticles. The cells are green, the cell nuclei are blue and the nanoparticles are red. Photo: Habib Baghirov, NTNU27.05. 2014
Sylvie Lelu at our Department has extracted cells from pig brain. If she and the research team succeed, it will be possible to deliver drugs to a part of the body that drugs currently cannot reach.

Killing cancer cells with super glue

The picture shows cells that have taken up nanoparticles. The cells are green, the cell nuclei are blue and the nanoparticles are red. Photo: Habib Baghirov, NTNU27.05. 2014
Sylvie Lelu at our Department has extracted cells from pig brain. If she and the research team succeed, it will be possible to deliver drugs to a part of the body that drugs currently cannot reach.

Using nanocapsules containing cancer drugs, researchers have succeeded in attacking tumours with surgical precision. One of the ways to manufacture such capsules is with minute droplets of super glue.

This new means of delivering drugs has already been successfully tested on mice and rats and, according to researchers at SINTEF, could open the way for entirely new treatments of brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

More on the topic in GEMINI - Killing cancer cells with super glue


Albert Einstein. Tegnet av Jan O. Copyright: Jan O. Henriksen

Contact information

Phone:  +47 73593478
Email: postmottak@phys.ntnu.no
www.ntnu.edu/physics

Visiting address

Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget (Natural Science Building), D5-170
More contact information