ECOSHRUB

Carbon

Carbon budget consequences of shrub expansion

- Ph.D. project
We investigate consequences of shrub expansion and grazing patterns in relation to carbon budgets in three alpine plant communities (meadow, heath, willow). The study provides important baseline data of CO2 fluxes (source and sink capacity) and C stocks in the three communities, and relates functional traits to carbon dynamics in the alpine ecosystems. We exclude large and small grazers to investigate the effect of grazing on C budgets. We also transplanted willows in all three sites to look at C budget consequences with of shrub expansion.

Timeframe: Start 2013, end 2018.
Who is involved:
Mia Vedel Sørensen
Bente Jessen Graae
Richard Strimbeck
Brian Enquist

Mia Vedel Sørensen and Rozalia Kapaz walking from one plot to the next within the willow site. Photo: Benjamin Blonder


Carbon fluxes in relation to temperature in Alpine tundra plants

- Master project
In this project, we investigate how the photosynthetic assimilation rate change at warmer temperatures for some of the important Alpine tundra species in the Dovre Mountains of Norway; Salix glauca, S. phylicifolia, S. lapponum, Empetrum nigrum, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, and Betula nana. This was done by measuring gas exchange with a LI-6400 portable photosynthesis system, with an attached lighted conifer chamber, allowing control over the environment around a small branch. Information on each species’ ability to maintain an effective photosynthetic rate at higher temperatures, will give important insight into how they will cope in a warmer climate.
Timeframe: Start July 2014, end June 2015
Who is involved:
Diana Eckert 
Richard Strimbeck 
Bente Jessen Graae 
Mia Vedel Sørensen 


Carbon fluxes of mosses in alpine ecosystems

- Master project
Here we will be measuring photosynthetic and respiration rates in the dominant moss species in experimental plots. The results will be used to estimate the contribution of bryophytes to the overall gas exchange dynamics of heath, meadow, and willow shrub communities in the Dovre Mountains. We also use gas exchange data and other traits to compare eco-physiological characteristics of mosses to those of other vascular plants.
Timeframe: Start spring 2015, end June 2016.
Who is involved:
Arnt Ove Liasjø 
Richard Strimbeck 
Simone Lang 
Mia Vedel Sørensen 

  • Dark measurement in the meadow, with happy field assistants. Photo: Mia Vedel Sørensen.
  • Mia Vedel Sørensen and Rozalia Kapaz walking from one plot to the next within the heath site. Photo
  • Hylocomium splendes, one of the species that Arnt Ove Liasjø will measure carbon fluxes and leaf traits on. Photo