Background and activities

You can now reach me at gibranvita@gmail.com

My research at NTNU was within inter-disciplinary EU projects on low-carbon lifestyles, sustainable well-being and <life-cycle informed> resource efficiency.

I applied Industrial Ecology tools to connect fundamental human needs and social practices to socio-economic metabolism and global environmental impact. I worked across disciplines and collaborated with psychologists, anthropologists, economist, etc. to investigate the nuances of the sustainability transformation. 

I worked extensively with Input-Output Analysis, mainly on the novel MultiRegional Input-Output Model EXIOBASE. 

EU projects:

- GLAMURS: Green Lifestyles, Alternative Models and Upscaling Regional Sustainability: http://glamurs.eu/

- DESIRE: Development of a System of Indicators for a Resource efficient Europe: http://fp7desire.eu/about

Scientific, academic and artistic work

Displaying a selection of activities. See all publications in the database

Journal publications

Artistic productions

  • Vita, Gibran; Baumann, Henrikke. (2017) (still) hunters and gatherers. The Ethnografilm Festival, Paris, https://vimeo.com/132610165. 2017.

Report/dissertation

  • Vita, Gibran. (2018) The Environmental Impacts of Human Needs and Lifestyles: Connecting the global economy, natural resources and human wellbeing. 2018. ISBN 978-82-326-3537-5.

Others

  • Nilsen, Frank; Vita, Gibran. (2019) Velmente klimatiltak kan gjøre vondt verre med Gibran Vita. Norway [Radio]. 2019-09-04.
  • Vita, Gibran. (2019) Well-meaning climate measures can make matters worse. Norway [Avis]. 2019-06-28.
  • Marlene, Cimons; Vita, Gibran. (2018) For a Happier, Healthier World, Live Modestly. Australia [Internett]. 2018-12-06.
  • Vita, Gibran. (2018) Bigger people will need more food. Norway [Avis]. 2018-11-06.
  • Vita, Gibran. (2018) Spending our carbon budgets wisely. Norway [Avis]. 2018-11-15.
  • Ivanova, Diana; Vita, Gibran; Steen-Olsen, Kjartan; Stadler, Konstantin; Melo, Patricia C; Hertwich, Edgar G.. (2017) More stuff = more climate change?.