Keynote speakers

Keynote speakers

Professor David Wardle: "Long-term drivers of aboveground-belowground linkages and ecosystem functioning"

Professor David Wardle: "Long-term drivers of aboveground-belowground linkages and ecosystem functioning"

 

David Wardle is Smithsonian Professor of Forest Ecology at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. His research explores linkages between aboveground and belowground communities and their consequences for ecosystem functioning. Current projects focus on impacts of invasive biota; consequences of wildfire; changes across successional, retrogressive and elevational gradients; island ecology; and ecology of forest understory vegetation. He has authored two books on aboveground-belowground linkages (with Princeton University Press in 2002 and Oxford University Press in 2010), and >300 peer-reviewed journal articles including around 25 in Science and Nature. He serves or has served on several editorial boards, including for Science, Ecology, Ecology Letters and the Journal of Ecology. He is recognized as a highly cited scientist and as among the world’s 20 most cited scientists in ecology and environmental sciences, and is an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand and a Wallenberg Scholar.

For more information see: http://www.slu.se/en/cv/david-wardle/

 

Professor Georgina Mace: "Exploring the ecology of natural capital accounting"

Professor Georgina Mace: "Exploring the ecology of natural capital accounting"

Georgina Mace DBE FRS is Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems and Director of the UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research (CBER).  Her current research interests are in measuring the trends and consequences of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change.  She led the scientific work behind the criteria used in IUCN’s Red List of threatened species (2000), was responsible for biodiversity elements in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005), and the methodology used in the UK National Ecosystem Assessment (2011). She was President of the British Ecological Society (2011-2013), President of the Society for Conservation Biology (2007-2009) and Chair of the DIVERSITAS global environmental change program (2011-2014). She was the winner of the 2016 Heineken Prize for Environmental Science. Currently she is a member of the UK Government’s Natural Capital Committee, a member of the Council of NERC and of the Royal Society.

 

 

Professor Trine Bilde: "Cooperation and inbreeding mating systems in social animals: causes and consequences"

Professor Trine Bilde: "Cooperation and inbreeding mating systems in social animals: causes and consequences"

Trine Bilde is professor and group leader at Aarhus University. She is interested in the evolution of sociality, in particular cooperative breeding, reproductive skew, female biased sex-ratio, and the transition to social inbreeding mating systems, which are characteristics of some social systems. She study the genomic and population genetic consequences of sociality and inbreeding mating systems, and genetic and non-genetic processes involved in adaptation to different environments. Her research focuses on the spider genus Stegodyphus that contains both social and subsocial (temporarily social) species, we work in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, India and Israel.

She is also interested in the evolution and maintenance of alternative reproductive strategies in the nursery web spider Pisaura mirabilis. Current projects aim to understand 1) the ecology and evolution of sociality, 2) the evolution of allomaternal care and reproductive division of labour, 3) population genomic consequences of inbreeding, 4) non-genetic processes involved in adaptation, 5) evolutionary ecology of alternative reproductive strategies.

Professor William Sutherland: "Making ecological decisions in a post truth world"

Professor William Sutherland: "Making ecological decisions in a post truth world"

William Sutherland is the Miriam Rothschild Chair in Conservation Biology at the University of Cambridge.

As well as his interests in population ecology he has spent an ever increasing proportion of his time in finding ways of improving the links between science, policy and practice. The main tools are horizon scanning, identifying priority questions to set agendas, subject-wide evidence synthesis and improving the manner in which experts are used in decision making. His ambition is to change policy and practice both in conservation and more widely.  

For more information seehttp://www.zoo.cam.ac.uk/directory/bill-sutherland