The Systems Inflammation Research Group

The Systems Inflammation Research Group

The Systems Inflammation Research Group at CEMIR

The Systems Inflammation Research Group uses state-of-the-art systems-level approaches to study the role of two post-translational modifications (PTMs) in antiviral signaling and inflammation. Infectious diseases and inflammatory disorders are major contributors to the global burden of disease, thereby having a huge socio-economic impact.

Infectious diseases and inflammatory disorders are major contributors to the global burden of disease, thereby having a huge socio-economic impact. Decades of research have unraveled the arsenal of mechanisms by which the host immune system detects an invading microbe and elicit an innate immune response ensuring clearance of the pathogen while exerting a minimal damage to the host. Any failure in this chain could lead to chronic diseases such as Atherosclerosis; as well as devastating conditions like sepsis and sepsis-induced death. It is critical for the host to restore homeostasis and resolve the inflammation upon microbial infections through a collective and meticulous coordination of a number of controlled molecular events such as chromatin remodeling, transcription, translation, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and metabolic reprogramming. The systems inflammation research group aims to specifically study the role of metabolic reprogramming and PTMs (phosphorylation, acetylation and succination) in antiviral signaling and inflammation using state-of-the-art systems-level approaches such as mass spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics. Additionally, we employ CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-wide/targeted genetic screens to identify key regulators; upon viral infection such as HIV or Influenza and other inflammatory stimuli. We believe that our basic research-focused systems-level approaches would yield deeper and broader understanding of inflammatory signaling which will have enormous translational potential.

The research group led by Richard K. Kandasamy currently includes 2 Ph.D. students, 4 post-docs and 1 Masters student. We work in close collaboration with CEMIR research groups led by Terje Espevik and Trude H. Flo; as well as Per Bruheim (Department of Biotechnology, NTNU), Denis Kainov (Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, NTNU) and Geir Slupphaug (NTNU Proteomics Core). Our international collaborators include Kate Fitzgerald (UMASS Medical School, Worcester, USA), Egil Lien (UMASS Medical School, Worcester, USA), Giulio Superti-Furga (Center for Molecular Medicine, Vienna, Austria), Christoph Bock (Center for Molecular Medicine, Vienna, Austria), Andre Muller (Center for Molecular Medicine, Vienna, Austria), Rune Linding (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark), Keshava Prasad (Center for Systems Biology and Molecular Medicine, Yenepoya University, Mangalore, India), Min-Sik Kim (Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea) and Akhilesh Pandey (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA).

13 May 2021

Research documentation

Research documentation

  1. Bösl, K., Ianevski, A., Than, T. T., Andersen, P. I., Kuivanen, S., Teppor, M., Zusinaite, E., Dumpis, U., Vitkauskiene, A., Cox, R. J., Kallio-Kokko, H., Bergqvist, A., Tenson, T., Oksenych, V., Bjørås, M., Anthonsen, M. W., Shum, D., Kaarbo, M., Vapalahti, O., Windisch, M. P., Superti-Furga, G., Snijder, B., Kainov, D. and Kandasamy, R. K. (2019). Critical Nodes of Virus-Host Interaction Revealed Through an Integrated Network Analysis. Frontiers in Immunology. Under revision. Preprint available in bioRxiv: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/548909v1
  2. Subbannayya, Y., Pinto, S. M., Bösl, K., Prasad, T. S. K. and Kandasamy, R. K. (2019). Dynamics of dual specificity phosphatases and their interplay with protein kinases in immune signaling. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 20:2086.
  3. Skjesol, A., Yurchenko, M., Grøvdal, L.M., Bösl, K., Agliano, F., Patane, F., Lentini, G., Kim, H., Teti, G., Kandasamy, R.K., Sporsheim, B., Starheim, K., Schink, K.O., Golenbock, D.T., Stenmark, H., McCaffrey, M., Espevik, T., and Husebye, H. (2018). The TLR4 adaptor TRAM controls phagocytosis of Gram-negative bacteria through the Rab11-family interacting protein 2. PLoS Pathogens. 15(3):e1007684.
  4. Bösl, K., Giambelluca, M., Haug, M., Bugge, M., Espevik, T., Kandasamy, R. K.* and Bergstrøm, B. (2018). Transcriptome analysis reveals distinct Toll-like receptor 2/8 activation signaling in human monocytes. Frontiers in Physiology. 9: 618. *co-corresponding author.
  5. Lee, S. E., Song, J., Bösl, K., Müller, A. C., Vitko, D., Bennett, K. L., Superti-Furga, G., Pandey, A., Kandasamy, R. K.* and Kim, M. S. (2018). Proteogenomic analysis to identify missing proteins from haploid cell lines. PROTEOMICS. 18: 1700386. *co-corresponding author. Article was also featured in the front cover page of this issue.
  6. Yurchenko, M., Skjesol, A. Ryan, L., Richard, G. M., Kandasamy, R. K., Wang, N., Terhorst, C., Husebye, H. and Espevik, T. (2018). SLAMF1 is required for TLR4-mediated TRAM-TRIF dependent signaling in human macrophages. The Journal of Cell Biology. 217: 1411-1429.
  7. Hansen, M. D., Johsen, I. B., Stiberg, K. A., Sherstova, T., Wakita, T., Richard, G. M., Kandasamy, R. K., Meurs, E. F. and Anthonsen, M. W. (2017). Hepatatis C Virus triggers Golgi fragmentation and autophagy through the immunity-relared GTPase M. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 114: E3462-E3471.
  8. Kandasamy, R. K., Vladimer, G. I., Snijder, B., Müller, A. C., Rebsamen, M., Stefanovic, A., Bigenzahn, J., Moskovskich, A., Scorzoni, S., Brückner, M. Cleary, C., Kralovics, R., Colinge J., Bennett, K. L. and Superti-Furga, G. (2016). A time-resolved molecular map of macrophage response to VSV infection. npj Systems Biology & Applications. 2: 16027.
  9. Rebsamen, M.*, Kandasamy, R. K.* and Superti-Furga, G. (2013). Protein interaction networks in innate immunity. Trends in Immunology. S1471-4906(13)00079-3. * Equal contribution
  10. Pichlmair, A., Kandasamy, K., Alvisi, G., Mulhern, O., Stefanovic, A., Eberle, C., Fauster, A., Goncalves, A., Bürckstümmer, T., Müller, A., Habjan, M., Lindsten, K., Goodbourne, S., Kochs, G., Weber, F., Bartenschlager, R., Bennett, K. L., Bowie, A., Colinge J. and Superti-Furga G. (2012). Viral immune modulators perturb the human molecular network by common and unique strategies. Nature. 487: 486-490.

person-portlet

Group Leader

Richard Kumaran Kandasamy
Associate Professor (Onsager Fellow)
richard.k.kandasamy@ntnu.no
+47-72824511

People_Systems Inflammation

Collaboration

Collaboration

  • Giulio Superti-Furga, CeMM Center for Molecular Medicine, Vienna, Austria
  • Rune Linding, University of Copenhagen and Biotech Research and Innovation Center (BRIC), Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Keshava Prasad, YU-IOB Center for Systems Biology and Molecular Medicine, Yenepoya University, Mangalore, India
  • Min-Sik Kim, Kyung Hee University, South Korea
  • Akhilesh Pandey, The Pandey Lab, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA
  • Per Bruheim, Department of Biotechnology, NTNU
  • Geir Slupphaug, PROMEC, NTNU
  • Kate Fitzgerald, UMASS Medical School, Worcester, USA
  • Denis Kainov, NTNU
  • Trude H. Flo, NTNU

Join us

Join us

If you are motivated to join our team, please send an email with your CV and a cover letter stating your research interests to Richard Kandasamy, the research group manager. Email: richard.k.kandasamy@ntnu.no