What we achieved

What we achieved

Team picture

At the project’s end, we have made progress in Nepal and Sri Lanka in terms of positive changes in health care for women living with domestic violence.

We have increased knowledge about the significance and scope of the phenomenon of domestic violence and the women who are at highest risk in pregnancy.

We have clear ideas now of how to integrate culturally sensitive systematic assessment of domestic violence and safety planning into standard antenatal care practice. 

The study has raised the profile of the issue of domestic violence and legitimised the roles of the health sectors in Nepal and Sri Lanka in efforts to reduce domestic violence and mitigate its harms.

We have increased the capacity of health providers to understand the experience of domestic violence through training, and have gained new knowledge to further develop and improve the training of health providers in the future.


Highlights of the study’s achievements include:

  • Development of an instrument to assess the burden of domestic violence in pregnancy in Nepal and a pioneering prevalence study with over 2000 women. Additionally, two qualitative studies in Nepal provided information on risk and protective factors, social norms and other drivers of domestic violence, as well as women’s expectations from antenatal care providers.
  • The assessment of victims’ expectations from antenatal care led partners in Nepal to deliver 3-days of training for health providers on the role of the health sector in addressing gender-based violence.
  • The qualitative studies in Nepal and Sri Lanka provided input for further revisions to the content and pedagogical techniques for training nurses and midwives.
  • More than 1000 pregnant women in Nepal received education on safety-promoting measures at their regular antenatal care appointments; 62 of them were followed-up after childbirth to assess the effectiveness of the safety education.
  • We consulted health providers in Sri Lanka about the training they have received to improve their capacity to assist pregnant women living with domestic violence. Their assets, constraints, strategies were evaluated and recommendations were made to government stakeholders to improve their training and work conditions.
  • The study also led to innovations in research technology and methods development, advancing the status of knowledge of interventions in antenatal care to identify and assist women experiencing domestic violence in low-income country (LIC) contexts. We have also developed spin-off research projects.

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