Energy Transition Week

Energy Transition Week 2019: 25-29 March

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Energy Transition Week 2019: 25-29 March

Workshops

Workshops

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The current electricity market design in Europe might not be ideal for the future carbon lean system. New developments in the electricity sector will be driven by the need for environmental and climate sustainability, technological developments in efficient generation technologies, and innovations at the system integration level. This workshop will focus on economic mechanisms to incentivize investment in systems and technologies that aim to lower energy costs, improve security of supply, and lower carbon emissions. The workshop topic will be a selection of (but not limited to) the following:

  • Market design for electricity systems dominated by renewable generation sources.
  • Incentives for trading off investment in storage, transmission and distribution network, generation, and demand management.
  • The role of hydropower in this context.

Confirmed speakers:

Hans Auer (TU Vienna), Luiz Barroso (PSR Brazil), Peter Bauhofer (TIWAG), Mette Bjørndal (NHH), Ole Gunnar Dahlhaug (NTNU), Annelies Delnooz (Vito), Gerard Doorman (Statnett), Joachim Geske (Imperial College), Bente Hagem (ENTSOE), Atle Harby (Sintef), Danny Ralph (Cambridge University), Christian Skar (Powel/NTNU), Daniel Stølsbotn (Nord Pool/NODES), Berit Tennbakk (Thema), Caroline Østlie (Statkraft).

Date: 25 March
Time: 0900-1600
Registration: Press here 
Place: Quality Hotel Augustin, Kongensgate 26, 7011 Trondheim
Contact: Håvard Tangvik
 

Smart Cities – Idea-generation on greener cities for the future

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Welcome to a 4-hour student workshop at NTNU, where we work on topics related to Smart Cities – how can we re-think the way we live in cities to stimulate the energy transition?

We will work on how we can involve citizens in using the city in new ways, and that the citizens themselves can be active participants in the future energy system. The workshop will start with getting a general background on how we could stimulate citizen participation and interactions, to could help create new ways of tackling energy use, pollution, transportation and energy efficiency in the cities. Then, we go into concrete issues where cities, citizens and industry could work and interact smarter in the future – and generate ideas that could be parts of the solution.

  • How should cities tackle transport in the future, with fewer cars and more use of public transport?
  • How can cities reduce their demand for energy or use energy in a smarter way?
  • How could we reduce the amount of air pollution or waste in our cities?

This student workshop is in the lead-up to the Energy Transition conference 2019, where you can meet and discuss with other students that share your interest in the future of energy, through team-based idea generation.

Date: 25 March
Time: 1200-1600
Registration: Press here
Place: Fram Innovasjonssenter, 3. etg Gamle Fysikk, Gløshaugen, 7034 Trondheim
Contact: Håvard Tangvik

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In this workshop, selected results of five ongoing EU projects are presented which focus on the role of citizens in the energy transition (as consumers but also in other roles as citizens). A common theme in all projects is exploring the roles citizens take in relation to energy use and transition of energy systems, adoption of new technologies, de-centralized production of energy, etc. They also focus on the impact the energy transition has on individuals, social groups and societies and the complex interaction between the energy transition and other societal developments. The projects utilize a large variety of methods from the social science spectrum and are characterized by active stakeholder involvement. The workshop includes an activating participatory session in the end, integrating the project results with the workshop participants’ understandings.

Confirmed speakers:

Ines Campos (University of Lisbon), Audley Genus (Kingston University London), Christian Klöckner (NTNU), Erica Löfström (NTNU), Giuseppe Pellegrini Masini (NTNU), Karina Standal (CICERO)

Date: 27 March
Time: 1000-1500
Registration: Press here 
Place: Quality Hotel Augustin, Kongensgate 26, 7011 Trondheim
Contact: Håvard Tangvik

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Transportation stands out as a key sector when striving to decarbonize our societies. In this workshop, we will explore key issues within research on transport towards 2050, seeking to enlighten where current research is leading us, what is missing and what should be our future agenda of inquiry. A special focus will be given to the role of new technologies in transforming modes of mobility and practices of transport. Digitalization, electrification, sharing and automation are three trends that are considered important. Rather than consider these technologies as unambiguously representing progress, this workshop will investiagte them as elements that can be part of transforming societies, and life on future roads.

Such technologies might entail substantial benefits to society, but history also illustrates that new technologies often bring unforeseen social consequences. Are for instance autonomous vehicles a way of extending a non-sustainable car-based society, or will they herald a society with far fewer vehicles that are mostly shared? Will such technology democratize mobility, providing universal and instant access, or will they mainly work in highly gentrified areas, reinforcing patterns of social stratification in access to transport? Will big data from millions of vehicles primarily be used to help optimize transportation patterns and increase road safety, or will we see the emergence of new information ecologies, which will largely serve the interest of tech-giant corporations?

The answers to such questions are highly contingent on contemporary practices of innovation, planning and technology development, and the degree to which such processes reflexively engage with societal questions. Further, they depend on perceived public needs and aspirations produced in contemporary mobility culture, and the many practices that today leads people to drive, cycle, walk, and take the bus and train, and which leads companies to transport goods in the ways that they do. Hence, this workshop featuring international and national transport, mobility and innovations studies renowned scholars, will combine a future oriented gaze on expectations and imaginaries, with a contemporary focus on activities that either re-enforces or destabilizes how we as societies are mobile.

This workshop is hosted by the DRIVERS-project, funded by the Norwegian Research Councils program Transport 2025. See www.driversproject.org for more

Confirmed speakers:

Debbie Hopkins (Oxford University), Dimitri Milakis (DLR), Milos Mladenovic (Aalto University), Jack Stilgoe (UCL).

Date: 28 March
Time: 0900-1600
Registration: Press here 
Place: Quality Hotel Augustin, Kongensgate 26, 7011 Trondheim
Contact: Håvard Tangvik

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The energy system plays a central role in the transition to a low emission society. As variable renewable energy solutions enter a path of sustained growth in electricity, key energy transition challenges shift towards integrating large shares of renewables through additional flexibility and by decarbonizing other key emitting sectors, such as buildings, transport and industry. In this situation, energy system integration plays a major role, both in terms of integration of different energy vectors and in the sector coupling.

The goal of the workshop is to address both current research challenges and the policy dimension. In partiular we want to get an idea of which areas are most critical to focus on, concerning research, but also concerning policy development and how to best influence future climate politics. This workshop aims to identify the main research challenges for the energy system. It will do so by addressing different futures and for each of these by investigating some of the key questions:

  •  Technology choice and related infrastructures. Technology choice and focus on different energy carriers affects challenges for energy production, storage, infrastructure and value chain design.
  •  The consumer is at the center of the future energy system, taking a more active role by making the demand side more flexible. What is the potential role and how does human choice affect the different technologies?
  • Market design plays a key role incentivizing both short-term resource allocation and investments.
  • Policy support and instruments: How does policy support play together with markets and decision makers to promote the technologies needed?

The workshop will address three different futures, electrification, hydrogen, decentralization, focusing on the questions above:

  • Electrification
  • The hydrogen society
  • Fully decentralized system

Finally, the workshop will attempt to identify the main challenges to address in redesigning the energy system, focusing on how the energy system will play a role in low emission industry, transport and in the building sector. The end result will be a short policy brief with clear advice on which research is needed, and potentially which areas are the most critical, and which incentives should be prioritized in order to reach the climate goals set by Norway, by EU and by the UN.

Confirmed speakers:

Lars Bonderup Bjørn (EWII), Franziska Holz (DIW Berlin), Magnus Korpås (NTNU), Atsushi Kurosawa (IAE), Trieu Mai (NREL), Eirik Byklum (Equinor), Petter Nekså (Sintef), Lasse Torgersen (Hydro), Øystein Ulleberg (IFE), Knut Vrålstad (Statkraft).

Date: 28 March
Time: 1000-1700
Registration: Press here 
Place: Quality Hotel Augustin, Kongensgate 26, 7011 Trondheim
Contact: Håvard Tangvik

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In the 2015 Paris Agreement, world leaders pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions radically. This workshop addresses how fundamental change can be implemented in manufacturing and process industries focusing on metal production, fertilizer production, cement and refineries.

The fundamental question asked is: How can the transition be accelerated in these sectors in order to achieve sufficient emission reductions in 2030 and close to zero emissions in 2050. The objective of the workshop is to facilitate a discussion involving academia, industry and government, resulting in a policy brief addressing this topic. Some of the question to answer are:

  • What are the main research challenges that needs to be solved related to technologies and solutions
  • What type of sector couplings are needed, for example to the energy sector?
  • Related to the above, what are the needed policy instruments in the medium and in the long term needed to support the transition of industry?

The workshop will be organized in 4 sessions each of them consisting of two presentations aiming to give an overview of an essential part of the state-of-the art, two-three prepared interventions presenting insights from different perspectives as well as 45-minute discussion part.  The detailed program is in development, but the following topics will be included.

  • Technology challenges and solutions: The transition of industries will require emission reductions in mechanical work, in process heat, in steam production, from exhaust, and from other process emissions. While these in some cases invite a general discussion across industry segments, some of the main emitting industries also have particular issues that needs to be addressed. We focus mainly on iron and steel, aluminum, fertilizer, refineries and cement to identify specific challenges, but also synergies between these (for example CCS infrastructure, hydrogen as a fuel);
  • The time and speed of the transition: What is needed to succeed? Without considering the feasibility of the transition, what is needed in terms of contributions from the different geographical regions and from the different industry segment under different scenarios or the different shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs)?
  • Policy instruments to support the transition and local versus global participation: transition success requires cross-sectoral thinking, focusing on instigating society-wide change in a sustainable direction across Industries, dynamic constellations, but transformative action within them is constrained by path dependencies resulting from design, technological, investment, planning, and decisions. How should we proceed to succeed in the short run and towards 2050? What are the relative merits of regulatory and fiscal (taxes, cap-and-trade) approaches
  • Climate finance, green industry and global trade: How can the deep decarbonization of industry and accelerated transition be supported by financial institutions? What about global competition and carbon leakage in scenarios where pollution is priced differently in different parts of the world. What role will border adjustments play? How can the transition be implemented in a fair way, both considering the further development of emerging economies and industrialized companies. How can stranded assets be minimized? How will the present heterogeneous Paris policy environment affect competitiveness, trade and the economy? What is the role of climate finance, international work sharing and technology licensing?

Confirmed speakers:

Nate Aden (WRI), Marie Bysveen (Sintef), Jae Edmonds (JGCRI), Sverre Gotaas (Herøya Industripark), Jonas Helseth (Bellona), Håvard Hellvik Kvadsheim (Equinor), Frode Leversund (Gassco), Thina Saltvedt (Nordea), Johnny Stuen (Oslo Kommune), Ivar Valstad (Hydro), Mariësse van Sluisveld (PBL), Lise Winther (Yara).

Date: 29 March
Time: 0830-1500
Registration: Press here 
Place: Quality Hotel Augustin, Kongensgate 26, 7011 Trondheim
Contact: Håvard Tangvik

NTNU Energy Transition

 

28 Mars: Frokostmøte Hydrogen

28 Mars: Frokostmøte Hydrogen

Hvor: Quality Hotel Augustin
Når: Torsdag 28 mars, 0800-1000

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27 March: Technoport

27 March: Technoport