UKRAINE

 

NTNU will go to great lengths to be able to offer studies to Ukrainian refugees and investigate academic opportunities for Ukrainian researchers and academics.

We are planning to allocate 200 temporary full-time student places in Trondheim, Gjøvik and Ålesund for Ukrainian refugees from this autumn onward. If the demand is high, we are prepared to increase the capacity to 250 places. 

If - as predicted - many of the refugees primarily will want to study part-time, the quota of student places may allow capacity for offering  1000 – 1500 refugees an opportunity to study if the need dictates this. 

The courses and programmes offered, with application forms, will be presented on this site in early June. The plan is to arrange continuous admissions during the summer and up to the start of studies in the autumn.

For information on protection and residence in Norway for Ukrainian citizens, we refer to the latest updated information from the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI).

Ukrainian students and employees at NTNU

Ukrainian students and employees at NTNU

Yes. The Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) has decided that Ukrainian citizens staying in Norway on permits or visa-free visits can remain in Norway until further notice. See UDI’s website for more information.

Yes. There are currently no changes to NTNU’s policy on extension of the right to study. Students who need it will get an extension if they are delayed in the completion of the thesis, obligatory courses or production of credits.

All students from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus will receive an offer of extension of their housing contract with the Student Welfare Organization (Sit) in Trondheim, Gjøvik and Ålesund.

The Norwegian Government has established a grant scheme for spring 2022 to support self-financed Ukrainian, Russian, and Belarusian students.

Students struggling financially due to the war in Ukraine, or economic sanctions levied as a consequence of the war, can now apply for financial support.

This financial aid is available to students who are:

  • Citizens of Ukraine, Russia, or Belarus.
  • Self-financed and registered students or PhD candidates at NTNU for spring 2022.
  • Self-financed students or PhD candidates who have lost access to their funds due to the war in Ukraine.
  • Not eligible for support from the State Educational Loan Fund (Lånekassen) or other financial support programmes.

Students who qualify for financial support will receive up to 11,500 NOK per month. PhD candidates will receive up to 21,000 NOK. The financial support is in effect from March 1st to August 31st, 2022.

The amount of funds you receive is dependent on the amount you lost access to. For example, if you lost access to 8,000 NOK per month, you are eligible for 8,000 NOK per month through this programme.

For students who have a Norwegian bank account, or access to their account abroad, the funds will be transferred to an account in your name. The funds cannot be transferred to an account belonging to another person.

Students who do not have Norwegian bank accounts, or access to their accounts abroad, will receive cash cards.

Note that you may be asked to hand in necessary documents that can support your application. You will be contacted if we require further documentation or clarification.

Apply here (If you have not received the application form directly by e.mail from NTNU) 

Otherwise we will point out that he public transport operator AtB is offering everyone with a Ukrainian passport or ID card free travel on their buses, trams and boats in Trøndelag. Several other public transport companies have introduced the same scheme.

NTNU will be able to receive a number of Ukrainians as students, starting in august 2022.

It will be determined in June 2022 how many Ukranian students NTNU can receive, and how they will apply. We can not yet accept applications.

More information, including how to apply and when, will be posted on this page as soon as it is confirmed.

NTNU’s Norwegian course for foreigners will be offered in Ukrainian, starting in the 2022 autumn semester, free of charge.
 

Russian/Belarusian students and employees at NTNU

Russian/Belarusian students and employees at NTNU

Russian and Belarusian students or employees with immediate need for financial support (unable to support themselves in the short-term) due to the current situation, should contact their embassies in Norway for assistance. 

The Norwegian Government has established a grant scheme to support self-financed Ukrainian, Russian, and Belarusian students.

Students struggling financially due to the war in Ukraine, or economic sanctions levied as a consequence of the war, can now apply for financial support.

This financial aid is available to students who are:

  • Citizens of Ukraine, Russia, or Belarus.
  • Self-financed and registered students or PhD candidates at NTNU for spring 2022.
  • Self-financed students or PhD candidates who have lost access to their funds due to the war in Ukraine.
  • Not eligible for support from the State Educational Loan Fund (Lånekassen) or other financial support programmes.

Students who qualify for financial support will receive up to 11,500 NOK per month. PhD candidates will receive up to 21,000 NOK. The financial support is in effect from March 1st to August 31st, 2022.

The amount of funds you receive is dependent on the amount you lost access to. For example, if you lost access to 8,000 NOK per month, you are eligible for 8,000 NOK per month through this programme.

For students who have a Norwegian bank account, or access to their account abroad, the funds will be transferred to an account in your name. The funds cannot be transferred to an account belonging to another person.

Students who do not have Norwegian bank accounts, or access to their accounts abroad, will receive cash cards.

Note that you may be asked to hand in necessary documents that can support your application. You will be contacted if we require further documentation or clarification.

Apply here (If you have not received the application form directly by e.mail from NTNU) 

There are currently no changes to NTNU’s policy on extension of the right to study. Students who need it will get an extension if they are delayed in the completion of the thesis, obligatory courses or production of credits.

All students from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus will receive an offer of extension of their housing contract with the Student Welfare Organization (Sit) in Trondheim, Gjøvik and Ålesund.

Students from Russia or Belarus currently on exchange at NTNU will be able to finish their exchange stay as usual.

In general, you need a valid reason/permit to remain in Norway. It may, however, be challenging for Russian citizens to travel home. The EU and Norway have closed their airspace to Russian aircraft, which means that many flights to Russia will be cancelled. If you have a student/residence permit that expires, this might hinder your journey home. 
 
If so, you must keep documentation that shows that you have tried to return home. You can document this with your flight ticket and confirmations from the airline that the flight was cancelled. You must return home as soon as possible and find alternative ways to travel if you cannot take a flight. 
 
Russian citizens with renewable residence permits can apply for renewal and have their applications processed in the usual way.

If you fear persecution upon return to Russia, you may apply for protection (asylum) in Norway. 
 
Read more on UDI’s webpage about the Ukraine situation.

Russian applicants to degree programmes in Norway apply as private persons not affiliated with any institution, and are therefore not affected by the suspension of academic cooperation with Russia.

NTNU and other Norwegian universities will process degree applications from Russian citizens as usual.

No. NTNU cannot defer admissions to next year. If you do not accept your offer of a study place at NTNU, you must apply again next year. Please inform us as soon as possible if you decide not to accept.

NTNU has no exchange agreements with Belarusian institutions, but students at Belarusian institutions can still apply for exchange to NTNU on an individual basis.

The Norwegian government has suspended nearly all Norwegian academic cooperation with Russia on the national and institutional level. This includes NTNU’s student exchange agreements with Russian education institutions. As such, NTNU cannot accept exchange students from Russian institutions for the 2022/2023 academic year.
 
However, non-institutional reseracher-to-reseracher cooperation is explicitly not affected by the suspension of agreements, meaning that Russian placement students may still come to NTNU.

Research and collaboration

Research and collaboration

At the moment, our best recommendation for Ukrainian scholars is to apply for relevant vacant positions at NTNU. NTNU is committed to open merit-based recruitment and already has some Ukrainian staff members. Our departments may also investigate opportunities for temporary engagements in research projects or the possibility to invite guest researchers with their own funding.

Other tips could be to check out EU programmes and funding opportunities for Ukrainian researchers on ERA4UkraineScholars at Risk (SAR) has also listed possible resources for at-risk scholars affected by the crisis in Ukraine.

Note that Ukrainians must have a residence permit to work in Norway. Academic staff may obtain residence permits for skilled workers. Ukrainian refugees who have been granted collective protection may also work in Norway.

In a letter to Norwegian universities the Ministry of Education and Research has recommended the institutions to explore ways to include Ukrainian researchers in their academic communities. These range from including them in existing projects to offering office space and a work environment to those who have the opportunity to continue their work affiliated to their home institution. 

The Government has not imposed an academic boycott of Russia, but institutional agreements between Norwegian and Russian institutions should generally be put on hold. Any research collaboration related to nuclear emergency preparedness as well as fisheries and resource management will continue as before. The Ministry asks to be informed if institutions believe there is particular reason to continue their collaboration.

We know there are also questions about what to do with the funds allocated to the Russian research partners in the consortia (EU and the Research Council of Norway). This must be clarified with the organization allocating the research funds. Questions should be addressed to the research section at the faculty and/or the Rector's research staff.  

The Government believes that researcher-to-researcher collaboration should be continued as long as the institutions and academic communities regard it as justifiable. However - as long as the war is ongoing in Ukraine it is wise to be cautious about opening up to Russian and Belarus participation at conferences organized by NTNU.

Russian applicants must be evaluated in terms of the ordinary regulations and guidelines for appointment.  A security assessment of research activity must be carried out in accordance with the export control regulations, where particular caution must be taken as a result of the conflict situation.  

Managers and the academic communities have a duty of care to their own staff. Be aware that some employees may need adaptations in their work at a personally demanding time. If professional help is needed, the occupational health service can be contacted. If temporary contracts are about to expire and the situation in their home country indicates that it is not safe for them to travel there, the academic communities should explore the opportunities they have to assist researchers in the form of extensions or short-term engagements.  

If a PhD candidate is absent from work, this may entitle the candidate to an extension. To document absence, the PhD candidate has a duty to inform their employer in accordance with the department’s procedures for such absence, as well as to register the absence in the HR portal/Paga, regardless of whether the absence entitles the candidate to an extension.

Undocumented absence does not entitle the candidate to an extension. PhD candidates with longer-term illness or adverse mental strain that affects their work are encouraged to consult a doctor so that together they can assess whether sick leave is necessary.   

In connection with a potential extension, the Faculty or Department must conduct an individual assessment for each PhD candidate. The basis for this is usually an application for an extension submitted according to the procedures in effect at the unit. Progress reporting, midway evaluation and appraisal interviews can be used as documentation and background material for the application.

The PhD candidate and supervisor should discuss the basis for an application. Then get in touch with the contact person at the Faculty or Department for more details about procedures for submitting applications.

Follow the advice from the Research Council of Norway and the EU to suspend Russian partners in projects in progress or put them on hold.   

The advice from the Research Council of Norway and the EU is to suspend Russian partners in projects in progress or put them on hold.   

This also means that institutional partners from Russia will not be included in research applications. They will not qualify to sign a project contract.   

Researcher-to-researcher collaboration should be continued as long as the institution regards it as justifiable. The sanctions and measures taken by the Government and the Ministry are aimed at Russian authorities.   

However - as long as the war is ongoing in Ukraine it is wise to be cautious about opening up to Russian and Belarus participation at conferences organized by NTNU.

As above - researcher-to-researcher collaboration should be continued as long as the institution regards it as justifiable. This also applies for cooperation on scientific papers. When co-publishing, it will be natural to mention all sources of funding in the publication.

The sanctions and measures taken by the Government and the Ministry are aimed at Russian authorities. Russian citizens in Norway must not in any way be held responsible for what the Russian authorities have now done, and they must experience that it is safe to study and work at Norwegian universities, university colleges and research institutes. 

Latest news from the Norwegian Government on the situation in Ukraine

Somebody to talk to

Somebody to talk to

The situation unfolding in Ukraine is deeply troubling. There is someone you can talk to if you are worried, scared, frustrated or angry.

Harassment or threats

Harassment or threats

​​​​​​If you have experienced harassment, threats, hate speech or other unacceptable behavior from colleagues or other students connected to the conflict in Ukraine, you should report this as soon as possible.

Report harassment or threats