Peer-reviewed articles

Peer-reviewed articles

Eskenazi, B., Etzel, R. A., Sripada, K., Cairns, M. R., Hertz-Picciotto, I., Kordas, K., ... & Suárez-López, J. R. (2020). The International Society for Children’s Health and the Environment Commits to Reduce Its Carbon Footprint to Safeguard Children’s Health. Environmental Health Perspectives, 128(1). doi: 10.1289/EHP6578

Key message: The organization ISCHE – International Society for Children’s Health & the Environment, described how climate change disproportionately threatens children’s health due to children’s unique vulnerability to heat stress, food scarcity, pollution and vector-borne diseases, lost family income, displacement, and the trauma of living through a climate-related disaster. In this statement, ISCHE outlined concrete steps that the organization leadership and members will take to address climate change, including immediate actions like flying less and working to make our professional meetings carbon neutral, as well as longer-term actions like working with our institutions to enact climate planning and acting on our responsibility as scientist-advocates, with the aim of encouraging other scientific organizations to critically examine their own carbon footprints.


Fjær, E. L., Landet, E., R., McNamara, C. L., & Eikemo, T. A. (2020): The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Europe. Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1186/2Fs12906-020-02903-w

Key message: The article aims to examine the determinants of CAM use at the individual and country level. The results suggest that greater resources, both at the individual level (e.g. education and income) and country-level (e.g. health expenditures per capita), is a common predictor for CAM use. 


Balaj, M. (in press). Self-reported health and the social body. Social Theory and Health.


Rydland, H., Solheim, E.F, & Eikemo, T.A. (2020). Educational inequalities in high- vs. low-preventable health conditions: Exploring the Fundamental Cause Theory. Social Science & Medicine. 133145. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113145


Weiss, D. & Eikemo, T.A. (2020). Technological innovations and health inequalities. Springer Nature: Handbook of Public Health. doi: 10.1371/2Fjournal.pone.0195447


Vonen, H.D., Olsen, M.L., Eriksen, S.S., Jervelund, S.S., & Eikemo, T.A. (in press). Refugee camps and COVID-19: Can we prevent a humanitarian crisis? Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 1403494820934952. doi: 10.1177/2F1403494820934952


Balaj, M. & Eikemo, T.A. (in press). Sick of social status: A Bourdieusian perspective on morbidity and health. Sociology of Health & Illness.


Rydland, H. T., Fjær, E. L., Eikemo, T. A., Huijts, T., Bambra, C., Wendt, C., Kulhánová, I., Martikainen, P., Dibben, C., Kalėdienė, R., Leinsalu, M., & Mackenbach, J. P., for the NORFACE HiNEWS project and the DEMETRIQ consortium (2020): Educational Inequalities in Mortality Amenable to Health care. A Comparison of European Health Care Systems. Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0234135

Key message: This article shows that all countries and health care systems exhibit relative and absolute educational inequalities in mortality amenable to health care. The health care system typology explains some between-country variation. Health care systems characterized by high budgets show lower relative and absolute inequalities than systems characterized by low budgets. We find no significant inequality differences between health care systems mainly differing in access regulation and choice control.


Stea, T.H., Nordheim, O., Bere, E., Stornes, P., & Eikemo. T.A. (2020). Fruit and vegetable consumption in Europe according to gender, educational attainment and regional affiliation - a cross-sectional study in 21 European countries. Plos One, 15 (5), e0232521, doi: 0.1371/journal.pone.0232521


Fjær, E.L., Landet, E.R., McNamara, C.L., & Eikemo. T.A. (2020). The use of complementary and alternative treatment (CAM) in Europe. BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies 20, 1-9. doi: 10.1186/2Fs12906-020-02903-w

Bambra, C., Reibling, N., McNamara, C., (2019). States of health: welfare regimes, health and health care., in:  Routledge Handbook of the Welfare State. Edited by Bent Greve. Routledge.

Key message: This chapter discusses how health research has influenced the development of welfare state regime typologies, and how these typologies have themselves influenced health research. Three key developments are examined: Firstly, the integration of health care services into the welfare state typologies literature; secondly, the importance of decommodification in regards to health and health care; and thirdly, how welfare state regimes have been used by comparative social epidemiologists to examine and explain international differences in population health and health inequalities.


Balaj, M. (2019). Albania Health Policies and Politics in Ellen Immergut (eds.) Health Politics in Europe: A Handbook. Oxford University Press.

Key message: This chapter discusses how health policy and politics have developed in Albania since 1989. through a review of all legislative acts and reform strategies of the healthcare system in the last three decades, this chapter identifies three main reforming periods which have shaped health rights and services in Albania. 


Balaj, M. (2019). Self-reported health and the social body. (Under review in Social Theory & Health).

Key message: This paper presents a critical review of existing evidence on the discrepancy between physical conditions and reporting of SRH across educational groups. After reviewing existing evidence, we contend that the discrepancy in SRH reporting across social groups, which has been argued to be a weakness of SRH as a health measure, is a strength from a sociological perspective. SRH as a social measure of health is a better predictor than objective measures of health precisely because it captures the lived experience of the embodied agent in the social context.


Balaj, Mirza; Eikemo, Terje Andreas. (2019) Sick of social status: A Bourdieusian perspective on morbidity and health. (under review in Sociology of Health and Illness).

Key message: This article examines empirically how differences in SRH observed among social groups for the same level of morbidity are associated to the position and the relative power of individuals in different educational groups to maintain or improve their social conditions, especially with increasing levels of health loss. Increasing levels of morbidity uncover the differential vulnerabilities of social groups in their experience of and response to health loss. To reduce these differences in vulnerability, it is important that both structural conditions and capabilities be considered key to the explanation of health inequalities.


Fjær, E. L. (2019). Inequalities in Health Care Utilization in Europe. (NTNU Thesis)


Øversveen, E. (2019) Teknologisk utvikling og sosial ulikhet i helse: Tilgjengeligheten av medisinsk teknologi i behandlingen av en kronisk sykdom (Technological development and social inequalities in health). Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift.

Key message: This study examines the relationship between medical technology and health inequalities based on a case study of the technological treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 24 patients with type 1 diabetes, the article demonstrates a widespread perception among diabetes patients that technology is difficult to acquire through the Norwegian health system. In the face of a perceived lack of resources in the Norwegian health system, the most socially advantaged informants develop a strategic orientation for gaining access, while others purchase the technology on a commercial diabetes technology market, potentially (re)producing health inequalities.


Arntzen, A., Bøe, T., Dahl, E., Drange, N., Eikemo, T.A., Elstad, J.I., Fosse, E., Krokstad, S., Syse, A., Sletten, M.A., Strand, B.H. (2019). 29 recommendations to combat social inequalities in health. The Norwegian Council on Social Inequalities in Health. Scand J Public Health, 47 (6). doi:10.1177/2F1403494819851364


Eikemo, T.A. & Øversveen, E. (2019). Editorial. Social inequalities in health: Challenges, knowledge gaps, key debates and the need for new data. Scand J Public Health, 47 (6). doi: 10.1177/2F1403494819866416


Besnier ,E. & Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Health and Well-being worldwide. In: The Governance Report 2019. Hertie School of Governance.


Stathopoulou, T. & Eikemo, T.A. (2019). New perspectives on the European refugee crisis. An empirical review. Journal of Refugee Studies, 32 (Special Issue 1). doi: 10.1093/jrs/fez096


Rapp, C. Hall, J., & Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Self-rated health and anti-immigrant attitudes. Journal of Refugee Studies, 32 (Special Issue 1).


Montgomery, C.J., Stathopoulou, T., & Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Asylum seeking parents’ reports of health deterioration in their children since fleeing their home country. Journal of Refugee Studies, 32 (Special Issue 1). doi: 10.1093/jrs/fez018


Smith-Jervelund, S., Nordheim, O., Stathopoulou, T., & Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Non-communicable diseases among refugees in Greek refugee camps – are their health needs met? Journal of Refugee Studies, 32 (Special Issue 1). doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckz186.025


Stathopoulou, T., Avrami, L., Cavounidis, J., Kostaki, A., Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Safety, Health and Trauma among Newly Arrived Refugees in Greece. Journal of Refugee Studies, 32 (Special Issue 1). doi: 10.1093/jrs/fez034


Eikemo, T.A., Mackenbach, J.P., Øverland, S., Balaj, M., Huijts, T., & Gakidou, E. (2019). Establishing a Global Socioeconomic Network and Data Warehouse to Monitor and Explain Health Inequalities. EuropeNow: Council for European Studies, issue 28.


Mutyambizi, C., Booysen, F., Stornes, P., & Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Subjective social status and inequalities in depressive symptoms: a gender-specific decomposition analysis for South Africa. International Journal for Equity in Health, 18(1). doi: 10.1186/s12939-019-0996-0


Hilier-Brown, F., Thomson, K., McGowan, V., Cairns, J.M., Eikemo, T.A., Gil-Gonzále, D., & Bambra, C. (2019). The effects of social protection policies on health inequalities: Evidence from systematic reviews. Scand J public Health, doi: 10.1177/1403494819848276.


Stalsberg, R., Eikemo, T.A., Lundgren, S., Johansen, R.R. (2019). Physical activity in long-term breast cancer survivors – a mixed-methods approach. The Breast, 46: 126-135. doi: 10.1016/j.breast.2019.05.014


Todd A, McNamara CL, Balaj M, Huijts T, Akhter N, Thomson K, Kasim A, Eikemo TA, Bambra C. The Europain Epidemic: pain prevalence and socioeconomic inequalities in pain across 19 European countries. (2019). European Journal of Pain. DOI: 10.1002/ejp.1409

 

Presentations

Eikemo, T.A. (2019). Invited lecture at Karolinska Institutet: Social Inequalities in health - what can be done to reduce them? This was part of a lecture series, which is presented by the Department of Global Public Health together with the Center of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Region Stockholm.

Eikemo, T.A. Avrami, L., Mouriki, A., Cavounidis, J., Kostaki, A., Gkiouleka, A., McNamara, C., & Stathopoulou, T. (2018). Introduction to the supplement: Health in crises. Migration, austerity and inequalities in Greece and Europe. European Journal of Public Health. Supplement. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cky223

Key message: This article provides an introduction to our supplement to the European Journal of Public Health, which elucidates the health impacts of the economic crisis in Greece and Europe, both among migrants and native-born. 


Stathopoulou, T., Stornes, P., Mouriki, A., Kostkati, A., Cavounidis, J., Avrami, L., McNamara, C., Rapp, C., & Eikemo, T.A. (2018). Health inequalities among migrants and natives. European Journal of Public Health, supplement: Health in crises. Migration, austerity and inequalities in Greece and Europe. 10.1093/eurpub/cky223

Key message: This article presents the MIGHEAL study, which was specifically designed to further our understanding of how health varies by social status, focusing particularly on migrant status in Greece.


Eikemo, T.A. Gkiouleka, A., Rapp, C., Skjønne Utvei, S., Huijts, T., & Stathopoulou, T. (2018). Non-communicable diseases in Greece: Inequality, gender and migration. European Journal of Public Health, supplement: Health in crises. Migration, austerity and inequalities in Greece and Europe. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cky219

Key message: Both among Greek-born and among immigrant groups in Greece, women report substantially higher rates of NCDs. These differences are mainly fostered by occupational factors.


Rapp, C., Eikemo, T.A., & Stathopoulou, T. (2018). Social integration and self-reported health: differences between immigrants and natives. European Journal of Public Health, supplement: Health in crises. Migration, austerity and inequalities in Greece and Europe. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cky206

Key message:  The article assesses the relationship between social integration, in terms of social contact and social trust, and one's individual health in Greece using the MIGHEAL data.  Our results suggest that immigrant status does play a moderating role in the relationship between social integration and health. 


Gkiouleka, A., Avrami, L., Kostkati, A., Eikemo, T.A., & Stathopoulou, T. (2018). Depressive symptoms among migrants and non-migrants in Europe: Documenting and explaining inequalities in times of socio-economic instability. European Journal of Public Health, supplement: Health in crises. Migration, austerity and inequalities in Greece and Europe. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cky202

Key message: This article shows that migrants report significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms in most European countries examined compared to non-migrants, except from in Greece and in the UK. Financial strain, childhood experiences of economic hardship and domestic conflict, female gender and perceived discrimination are associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms among both migrant and non-migrant populations, while social trust and living with children have a protective impact.


Eikemo, T.A. (2018). Editorial: Hidden health care in European health systems. Scand J Public Health, 46 (4): 433-435. doi: 10.1177/2F1403494818779885

Key message: More health care is provided outside the formal health system, by informal care providers, for example by women and family members. This editorial calls for a shift in the healthcare policy debate, from viewing lay persons as consumers of health care to seeing them as they are: its primary providers.


Øversveen, E. & Eikemo, T.A. (2018). Editorial: Reducing social inequalities in health: Moving from the ‘causes of the causes’ to the ‘causes of the structures’. Scand J Public Health, 46 (1): 1-5. doi: 10.1177/2F1403494818756574

Key message: In this editorial, we highlight the need for research that looks into the sustainable and reproductive nature of health inequalities by identifying the “causes of the structures”. This should be done by identifying the social relations, i.e. power, class, the political organization that generate inequalities in education, income and health. 


Arntzen, A., Bøe, T., Dahl, E., Drange, N., Eikemo, T.A., Elstad J.I., Fosse, E., Krokstad, S., Syse, A., Aaboen Sletten, M., Strand, B.H. (2018). Anbefalte tiltak mot sosial ulikhet i helse. Fagrådet for sosial ulikhet i helse. Oslo: Helsedirektoratet.

Key message: The Norwegian Expert Group on Social Inequalities in Health presents its 29 recommendations to combat health inequalities.


Thomson, K, Hillier-Brown, F., Todd, A., McNamara, C., Huijts, T., Bambra, C., (2018). The Effects of Public Health Policies on Health Inequalities in High-Income Countries: An Umbrella Review. BMC Public Health 18, 869. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5677-1

Key Message: This paper summarized evidence from 29 systematic reviews on the effect of public health policies on health inequalities in high-income countries. While some policy interventions were shown to reduce health inequalities (e.g. food subsidy programmes, immunisations), others had no effect and some appeared to increase inequalities. However, the quality of the included reviews was generally poor and there are clear gaps in the evidence base.


McNamara, C., De Soysa, I., (2018). Special Issue on trade and health: Introduction. Global Social Policy 18, 4–6. doi: 10.1177/2F1468018117748705

Key Message: This is an introduction to a Special Issue which includes papers originally presented at a Trade and Health workshop organized by the authors in Trondheim in 2016. Contributors to the Issue detail ways in which contemporary trade arrangements impact a wide range of health determinants and draw attention to how trade constrains countries’ freedom to create healthy public policies. 


McNamara, C., (2018). Is trade policy a missing piece to a public health puzzle? Global Social Policy 18, 81–87. doi: 10.1177/2F1468018117748699

Key Message: This paper focuses on the question of whether global processes might influence how social policies shape health. This is the first treatment of this question in the literature. The article specifically addresses the question of whether the persistence of health inequities in Nordic states can be partly seen as a failure of the welfare state to compensate for the impacts of greater global market integration


Huijts, T., McNamara, C.L., (2018). Trade agreements, public policy and social inequalities in health. Global Social Policy 18, 88–93. doi:10.1177/2F1468018117748698

Key Message: This article explores how trade agreements affect social inequities in health by focusing on three areas of public policy that have an established impact on social inequities in health: healthcare policy, public health policy and social policy. Our central argument is that recent trade agreements increase the need for public policy intervention to counteract rising health inequities, but at the same time, these agreements reduce the capacity of national governments to invest in intervention


Balaj, M. (2018). Social inequalities in health and disease: The Nordic paradox from a Bourdieusian perspective. (PhD Thesis).

Key message: This thesis argues that disease, health and social determinants of health emerge at the intersection of social practices and structures, which reflect the distribution of power in society. Differential capabilities of different social positions to change exposures to health-damaging conditions due to a combination of different social dis/advantages and dispositions enables social positions to preserve their health at different rates. Extended to a cross-national perspective the differences in the structure of social and economic relations creates differences in the composition and distribution of these social dis/advantages and capabilities for social positions leading to different cross-country patterns of health inequality.


Weiss, D.; Rydland, H. T.; Øversveen, E.; Jensen, Magnus R.; Solhaug, S.; Krokstad, S. (2018) Innovative technologies and social inequalities in health: A scoping review of the literature. PLoS ONE.vol. 13:e0195447 (4). doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0195447

Key message: Based on a systematic review process, this study outlines a novel classification of technologies and the need for critical distinctions between technologies based on how these technologies are both accessed and used by groups of various socioeconomic status. The results of this study provide a comprehensive starting point for future research to further investigate how innovative technologies may influence the unequal distribution of health as a human right in the age of technological revolution.


Øversveen, E. & Forseth, U. (2018). Fremmed i Nav. Den norske arbeidslinja i praksis (The institutional construction of unemployment. Examining the Norwegian work line). Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift, 04/2018, volume 2.

Key message: This article uses qualitative data from document analysis and in-depth interviews in order to study how the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration measure and evaluate the working capacity of unemployed youth. The analysis demonstrates that the institutional organization of the egalitarian principle that users with the lowest measured working capacity should also have access to the most resources leads to marginalised groups being subjected to more intense testing and control than others, intensifying stress and feelings of alienation. By showing the tensions between the ideals informing the Norwegian work line and their actual implementation, the article offers a new understanding of the institutional construction of unemployment.

 

Presentations

Eikemo. T.A. (2018). Conference of the Norwegian Public Health Association, Bergen, Key Note. Title: Do technological innovations increase social inequalities in health?


Eikemo, T.A. (2018). High-level meeting at the Norwegian Research Council about the need for more data on social inequalities in health: Key Note. Title: Social inequalities in health in Norway: why more research is needed.


Eikemo, T.A. (2018). Key Note at the Nordic Welfare Centre and The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs in Sweden. Conference on health equity in Stockholm 22-23 November. The conference was organized under the auspices of the Swedish chairmanship of the Nordic Council of Ministers. Title: Why social inequalities in health are unacceptable and what we can do to reduce them.

Eikemo, T. A. & Balaj, M. (2017). CHAIN – a new centre for the international study of
socioeconomic inequalities in health’, EuroHealthNet Magazine (issue 10), December. 


Weiss, D., Eikemo, T.A. (2017). Technological innovations and the rise of social inequalities in health. Scand J Public Health, 45(7):714-719. doi: 10.1177/1403494817711371

Key message: This article addresses whether the persistence of modern social inequalities in health has been significantly influenced by the coinciding revolution in technological innovation. A theoretical argument is offered for this potential connection and is discussed alongside the social determinants of health perspective and the fundamental cause perspective. Finally, a future research agenda is proposed.


Halvorsen, J.F., Sund, A.M., Zeltzer, L, Ådnanes, M., Jensberg, H., Eikemo T.A., Lund, B., Hjemdal, O., Reinfjell, T. (2017). Health-related quality of life and psychological distress in young adult survivors of childhood cancer and their association with treatment, education, and demographic factors. Qual Life Res. doi: 10.1007/s11136-017-1716


Fjær, E.L., Balaj, M., Stornes, P., Todd, A., McNamara, C.L., & Eikemo, T.A. (2017). Exploring the differences in general practitioner and health care specialist utilization according to education, occupation, income and social networks across Europe: findings from the European social survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 73-81. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw255


Bøe, T., Balaj, M., Eikemo, T.A., McNamara, C.L., & Solheim, E.F. (2017). Financial difficulties in childhood and adult depression in Europe. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 96-101. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw253


Beckfield J, Balaj M, McNamara CL, Huijts T, Bambra C, & Eikemo TA. (2017). The health of European populations: introduction to the special supplement on the 2014 European Social Survey (ESS) rotating module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 8-13. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw250


Huijts, T., Stornes, P., Eikemo, T.A., Bambra, C.; HiNews Consortium. (2017). Prevalence of physical and mental non-communicable diseases in Europe: findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 8-13. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw232


Huijts, T., Stornes, P., Eikemo, T.A., Bambra, C.; HiNews Consortium. (2017). The social and behavioural determinants of health in Europe: findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 55-62. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw231


Verbakel, E., Tamlagsrønning, S., Winstone, L., Fjær, E.L., & Eikemo, T.A. (2017) Informal care in Europe: findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 90-95. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw229


McNamara, C.L., Balaj, M., Thomson, K.H., Eikemo, T.A., & Bambra, C. (2017). The contribution of housing and neighbourhood conditions to educational inequalities in non-communicable diseases in Europe: findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 102-106. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw224


McNamara, C.L., Toch-Marquardt, M., Balaj, M., Reibling, N., Eikemo, T.A., & Bambra, C. (2017). Occupational inequalities in self-rated health and non-communicable diseases in different regions of Europe: findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 27-33. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw224


McNamara, C.L., Balaj, M., Thomson, K.H., Eikemo, T.A., Solheim, E.F., & Bambra, C. (2017). The socioeconomic distribution of non-communicable diseases in Europe: findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 22-26. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw222


Huijts, T., Gkiouleka, A., Reibling, N., Thomson, K.H., Eikemo, T.A., & Bambra, C. (2017). Educational inequalities in risky health behaviours in 21 European countries: findings from the European social survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1): 63-72. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw220


Fjær, E.L., Stornes, P., Borisova, L.V., McNamara, C.L., & Eikemo, TA. (2017). Subjective perceptions of unmet need for health care in Europe among social groups: Findings from the European social survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1):82-89. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw219


Balaj, M., McNamara, C.L., Eikemo, T.A., & Bambra, C. (2017). The social determinants of inequalities in self-reported health in Europe: findings from the European social survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. European Journal of Public Health. 1;27(suppl_1):107-114. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw217


Gadeyne, S., Menvielle, G., Kulhanova, I., Bopp, M., Deboosere, P., Eikemo, T.A., Hoffmann, R., Kovács, K., Leinsalu, M., Martikainen, P., Regidor, E., Rychtarikova, J., Spadea, T., Strand, B.H., Trewin, C., Wojtyniak, B.,  & Mackenbach, J.P. (2017). The turn of the gradient? Educational differences in breast cancer mortality in 18 European populations during the 2000s. International Journal of Cancer, doi: 10.1002/ijc.30685. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30685


Eikemo, T.A. (2017). Editorial: Introducing the new scope and editorial board of the Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45 (2): 85-89. doi: 10.1177/2F1403494816685497


Jonker, M.F., D'Ippolito, E., Eikemo, T.A., Congdon, P.D., Nante, N., Mackenbach, J.P., & Kamphuis, C.B. (2017). The effect of regional politics on regional life expectancy in Italy (1980-2010). Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45 (2): 121-131. doi: h10.1177/2F1403494816686266


Borisova, L.V., Martinussen, P.E., Rydland, H..T, Stornes, P., & Eikemo, T.A. (2017). Public evaluation of health services across 21 European countries: The role of culture. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45 (2): 132-139. doi: 10.1177/1403494816685920

Key message: This paper uses a multilevel analysis of satisfaction with health system using survey data. The main finding is that citizens are likely to evaluate their national health system more negatively in national cultures associated with autocracy and hierarchy.


Balaj, M., Huijts, T., McNamara, C.L., Stornes, P., Bambra, C., & Eikemo T.A. (2017). Non-communicable diseases and the social determinants of health in the Nordic countries: Findings from the European Social Survey (2014) special module on the social determinants of health. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45 (2): 90-102. doi: 10.1177/2F1403494816686026


Øversveen, E., Rydland, H.T., Bambra, C., & Eikemo, T.A. (2017). Rethinking the relationship between socio-economic status and health: Making the case for sociological theory in health inequality research. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45 (2): 103-112. doi: 10.1177/1403494816686711

Key message: Article assessing the most common explanations of social inequalities in health, arguing for a move towards more dynamic theoretical models, including less static social categories and a move away from unidirectional causality between social position and health.


Øversveen, E. & Eikemo, T.A. (2017). Brystkreft og sosial ulikhet i helse: Kan medisinske framskritt bidra til å gjøre samfunnet mer ulikt? BestPractice Onkologi/ Hematologi, 7 (34).


Kulhanová, I., Menvielle, G., Hoffmann, R., Eikemo, T.A., Kulik, M., Toch-Marquardt, M., Deboosere, P., Leinsalu, M., Lundberg, O., Regidor, E., Looman, C., Mackenbach, J.P., for the EURO-GBD-SE consortium. (2016). The role of three lifestyle factors in reducing differences in ischaemic heart disease mortality in Europe. European Journal of Public Health. Aug 12. pii: ckw104. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckw104

Eikemo, T.A., Huijts, T., Bambra, C,. & Fitzgerald, R. (2016). The first pan-European sociological health inequalities survey of the general population: the European Social Survey (ESS) rotating module on the social determinants of health. European Sociological Review, doi: 10.1093/esr/jcw019


Eikemo, T.A., Huijts, T., Bambra, C., McNamara, C., Stornes, P., & Balaj, M. (2016). Social Inequalities in Health and their Determinants: Topline Findings from Round 7 of the European Social Survey. ESS Topline Series, issue 6. European Social Survey ERIC: Centre for Comparative Social Surveys, London. 


Sund, E. & Eikemo, T.A. (2016) Illusions of paradise? Health Inequalities in Norway. EuropeNow. Published by Council for European Studies at Columbia University.

 

Presentations

Eikemo, T.A. (2016). Presentation of main results from the CHAIN-developed health module of the European Social Survey in Paris, les inégalités sociales de santé. Title: Social Inequalities in health and their determinants. Top lines results from round 7 of the European Social Survey


Eikemo, T.A. (2016). High-level meeting between HKH Mette Marit and Tore Godal (from GAVI) on Vaccination and child health, Chair.
 

Beckfield, J., Bambra, C., Eikemo, T.A., Hujits, T., McNamara, C., & Wendt, C. (2015). Towards an institutional theory of welfare state effects on the distribution of population health. Social Theory & Health, 13, 227–244. doi:10.1057/sth.2015.19


Hoffman, R., Eikemo, T.A., Kulhánová, I., Kulik., M., Looman, C., Menvielle, G., Deboosere, P., Martikainen, P., Regidor, E., & Mackenbach, J.P for the EURO-GBD-SE Consortium. (2015). Obesity and the potential reduction of inequalities in all-cause and cause-specific mortality: Evidence from 21 European populations. European Journal of Public Health, May 25, doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckv090


Vandenheede, H., Deboosere, P., Espelt, A., Bopp, M., Borell, C., Costa, G., Eikemo, T.A., Gnavi, R., Hoffmann, R., Kulhánová, I., Kulik, M., Leinsalu, M., Martikainen, P., Menvielle, G., Rodriguez-Sanz, M., Rychtariková, J., Mackenbach, J.P. (2015). Educational inequalities in diabetes mortality across Europe in the 2000s: the interaction with gender. International Journal of Public Health. doi: 10.1007/s00038-015-0669-8. Epub ahead of print (March 7).


Van der Wel, K.A, Bambra, C., Dragano, N., Eikemo, T.A., & Lunau, T. (2015). Risk and resilience: health inequalities, working conditions and sickness benefit arrangements: Analysis from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey. Sociology of Health & Illness, 2015 Jun 22. doi: 10.1111/1467-9566.12293


Dragano, N., Lunau, T., Eikemo, T.A., Toch-Marquardt, M., van der Wel, K.A., & Bambra, C. (2015). Who knows the risk? The prevalence of employees who are poorly informed about occupational health and safety risks systematically varies across European countries. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, doi: 10.1136/oemed-2014-102402


Mackenbach, J.P., Kulhanová, I., Menvielle, G., Eikemo, T.A., Östergren, O., Lundberg, O, for the EURO-GBD-SE Consortium. Trends in inequalities in premature mortality: a study of 3.2 million deaths in 13 European countries. (2015). Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, epub ahead of print, doi: 10.1136/jech-2014-204319


Mackenbach, J.P., Kulhanová, I., Menvielle, G., Kulik, M.C., Hoffmann, R., Eikemo, T.A., Östergren, O., & Lundberg, O, for the EURO-GBD-SE consortium. (2015). Variations in the relation between education and cause-specific mortality in 19 European populations: a test of the “fundamental causes” theory of social inequalities in health. Social Science & Medicine,  doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.05.021


Dragano, N., Bambra, C., Wahrendorf, M., Van der Wel, K, Eikemo, T.A., & Lunau, T. (2015). Die Auswirkung politischer Initiativen zum Nichtraucher-Schutz am Arbeitsplatz in Europa. Eine Analyse von Trends in Länderübergreifenden Beschäftigtensurveys. Das Gesundheitswesen, 77, (8-9).


Bambra, C & Eikemo, TA. (2015). Insecurity, unemployment and health. A social epidemiological perspective. Oxford Handbook of Job Loss and Job Search.  In Klehe, U. & van Hooft, E. (Eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Job Loss and Job Search. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Doi: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199764921.013.019


Holseter, C., Døving Dalen, J., Krokstad, S., & Eikemo, T.A. (2015). Selvrapportert helse og dødelighet i ulike yrkesklasser og inntektsgrupper i Nord-Trøndelag. Helseundersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag (HUNT). Tidsskrift for den norske legeforening, 135 (5), 434-438.

Holseter, C., Døving Dalen, J., Krokstad, S., & Eikemo, T.A. (2015). Self-rated health and mortality in different occupational classes and income groups in Nord-Trøndelag County  [translation of Selvrapportert helse og dødelighet i ulike yrkesklasser og inntektsgrupper i Nord-Trøndelag. Helseundersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag (HUNT)]. Tidsskrift for den norske legeforening. doi: 10.4045/tidsskr.13.0788


Espnes, G.A., Eikemo, T.A., & Gabrielli, K. (2015). Helhetlig satsing på global helse. In (editorial committee: Norad, Helsedirektoratet, Utdanningsdirektoratet,og Innovasjon Norge): Et utvalg innovative løsninger. Hustrykkeriet, Utenriksdepartementet: Oslo. 


European Social Survey (2015) Round 7 Module on Social Inequalities in Health and their Determinants - Question Design Final Module in Template. London: Centre for Comparative Social Surveys, City University London.

Kulhanová, I., Menvielle, G., Eikemo, T.A., Mackenbach, J.P. for the EURO-GBD-SE Consortium. (2014). Socioeconomic differences in the use of ill-defined causes of death in 16 European countries. BMC Public Health, 14 (1), 1295, doi: 0.1186/1471-2458-14-1295


Eikemo, T.A., Hoffmann, R., Kulik, M., Kulhanová, I., Toch, M., Menvielle, G., Looman, C., Jasilionis, D., Martikainen, P., Lundberg, O., Mackenbach, J.P., for the EURO-GBD-SE consortium. (2014). How can inequalities in mortality be reduced? A quantitative analysis of 6 risk factors in 21 Europe. PLOS ONE, 4;9(11), doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110952.


Van de Velde, S., Bambra, C., Eikemo, T. A., Bracke, P. Keeping it in the family: the self-rated health of lone mothers in different European welfare regimes. (2014). Sociology of Health & Illness, 36(8):1220-42. doi: 10.1111/1467-9566.12162.


Toch-Marquardt, M., Menvielle. G, Eikemo, T.A., Kulhánová, I., Kulik, M.C., Bopp, M., Esnaola, S., Jasilionis, D., Mäki, N., Martikainen, P., Regidor. E., Lundberg, O., Mackenbach, J.P, for the Euro-GBD-SE consortium. (2014). Occupational class inequalities in all-cause and cause-specific mortality among middle-aged men in 14 European populations during the early 2000s. PLOS ONE, 30;9 (9). doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108072


Kulhanová, I., Hoffmann, R., Judge, K., Eikemo, T.A., Mackenbach, J.P., for the EURO-GBD-SE consortium. (2014). Assessing the potential impact of increased participation in higher education on mortality: Evidence from 21 European populations. Social Science & Medicine, 117; 142-9. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.07.027. Epub 2014 Jul 11.


Kulhanová, I., Hoffmann, R., Eikemo, T.A., & Mackenbach, J.P. (2014). Educational inequalities in mortality by cause of death: first national data for the Netherland. International Journal of Public Health, June 27, epub ahead of print. doi: 10.1007/s00038-014-0576-4


Toch, M., Bambra C, Lunau T, Dragano N, & Eikemo T A. (2014). All part of the job? The contribution of the psychosocial and physical work environment to health inequalities in Europe and the European health divide. Int J of health services research, 44 (2), 285-305. doi: 10.2190/HS.44.2.g


Kulik, M., Eikemo, T.A., Regidor, E., Menvielle, G., Mackenbach, J.P. for the EURO-GBD-SE Consortium. (2014). Does the pattern of socioeconomic inequalities in smoking in Western Europe depend on the choice of survey? International Journal of Public Health, 59 (4):587-97. doi: 10.1007/s00038-014-0560-z


Mäki, N., Martikainen, P.T., Eikemo, T.A., Menvielle, G., Lundberg, O., Östergren, O., Mackenbach, J.P., for the EURO-GBD-SE Consortium. (2014). The potential for reducing educational differences in life expectancy in five European countries – the effects of obesity, physical inactivity and smoking. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 68 (7), 635-40. doi: 10.1136/jech-2013-203501


Bambra C, Lunau T, van der Wel K A, Eikemo T A, & Dragano N. (2014). Work, health and health: the association between working conditions, welfare states, and self-reported general health in Europe. Int J of health services research, 44 (1), 113-136. doi: 10.2190/hs.44.1.g


Kulhanová, I., Baciagalupe, A., Eikemo, T.A., Borrell, C., Regidor, E., Esnaola, S., Mackenbach, & the Eurothine consortium. (2014). Why does Spain have smaller inequalities in mortality? An exploration of potential explanations. European journal of Public Health, 24 (3), 370-7. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cku006


Lunau, T., Bambra, C., Eikemo, T.A., Van der Wel, K.A. & Dragano, N. (2014). A balancing act? Work-life balance, health and wellbeing in European welfare states. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 24 (3), 422-7. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cku010


Kulhanová, I., Hoffmann, R., Eikemo, T.A., & Mackenbach, J.P. (2014). Sociaaleconomische verschillen in sterfte naar doodsoorzaak: eerste nationale gegevens voor Nederland. Dutch Medical Journal, 158:A8188.


Bambra, C, Netuveli, G, & Eikemo, T.A. (2014). Welfare state regime life-courses: The development of Western European welfare state regimes and age-related patterns of educational inequalities in self-reported health (pp 316-336). In Navarro, V. & Muntaner, C (Eds.) The financial and economic crises and their impact on health and social well-being. New York: Baywood Publishing Company. doi: 10.2190/HS.40.3.b