News and events at the Department of Marine Technology (IMT) in 2019

Worthy winners for the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award

2018 marked the fourth year for the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award. 

Zhaolong Yu, from NTNU, won the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Structural Mechanics/Dynamics 2018, and Guoqiang Tang, from Dalian University of Technology, won the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Hydrodynamics 2018. 

Worthy winners for the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award

2018 marked the fourth year for the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award. 

Zhaolong Yu, from NTNU, won the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Structural Mechanics/Dynamics 2018, and Guoqiang Tang, from Dalian University of Technology, won the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Hydrodynamics 2018. 

A new international selection committee was established this year to evaluate the submitted papers, which consists of Prof. Masahiko Fujikubo and Prof. Masashi Kashiwagi, both from Osaka University.

The winner of the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Structural Mechanics/Dynamics 2018 is Zhaolong Yu, from NTNU, and the awarded paper is ‘Large Inelastic Deformation Resistance of Stiffened Panels Subjected to Lateral Loading’, published in Marine Structures and co-authored by Jørgen Amdahl, and Yanyan Sha. The winner was selected by Prof. Masahiko Fujikubo and Prof. Zhen Gao at NTNU.

The winner of the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Hydrodynamics 2018 is Guoqiang Tang, from Dalian University of Technology, and the awarded paper is ‘Effect of Oscillatory Boundary Layer on Hydrodynamic Forces on Pipelines’, published in Coastal Engineering and co-authored by Liang Cheng, Lin Lu, Yunfei Teng, Ming Zhao and Hongwei An. The winner was selected by Prof. Masashi Kashiwagi and Prof. Marilena Greco at NTNU.

The new underwater janitor

Snake robots will soon be assisting and, to some extent, replace divers and small submarines in the North Sea, but first, they will train and be tested at NTNU's test site in the Trondheim Fjord.

The new underwater janitor

Snake robots will soon be assisting and, to some extent, replace divers and small submarines in the North Sea, but first, they will train and be tested at NTNU's test site in the Trondheim Fjord.

Eelume is a spin-off company from NTNU, and develops snake robots able to live and operate on the ocean floor. The technology has a 15-year history at NTNU, going back to land-based snake robots designed to enter burning buildings and extinguish fires. Today the technology will help relive the pressure on divers at Norway’s many offshore facilities. 

The robots will start to operate at Equinor's facilities later in 2019, after they have undergone testing at NTNU's test sites.

You can read more about the testing and development of snake robots at Gemini.

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