The Hardanger Bridge monitoring project

 

The Hardanger Bridge, opened in 2013, is a 1380 m long suspension bridge crossing the Hardanger fjord in western Norway. The main span is 1310 m long, which makes it the longest suspension bridge in Norway and the 10th longest in the world. The two concrete bridge towers are 200 m high, made using the slip forming technique, and supports the steel bridge casing and the cables that are anchored in the mountain side.

The main objective with the monitoring project is to study the dynamic behaviour of the suspension bridge; especially the wind-induced vibrations. All data generated from the extensive measuring system is directly used in research related to the ferry-free costal highway E39 project; both PhD and master theses. 

Figure 1: The Hardanger Bridge. Photograph by NTNU/Ole Øiseth.

 

The monitoring system consists of the following sensors (illustrated in Figure 2):

  • 20 triaxial accelerometers
  • 9 anemometers

Figure 2: Illustration of the front view of the Hardanger Bridge, showing accelerometer and anemometer positions. Illustration by NTNU/Heidi Kvåle.

Projects:

The Hardanger Bridge monitoring project is mainly connected to the suspension bridge research programme. There are currently one postdoc and three PhD candidates working with this measuring system: