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Photos from doctoral awards ceremony 18-19 November


Find your PhD colleagues

You are one of many people sharing your knowledge with the rest of the world. In 2021, 443 candidates at NTNU received a doctoral diploma.
Read more about what your fellow PhD graduates have been working on.


doctoral awards ceremony 2021 - programme

Doctoral Awards Ceremony's programme

This year's doctoral awards ceremony is held at NTNU Gløshaugen in Trondheim.

  • Ceremony 18.11.21 at 12 noon - disputes 1.7. - 31.12.2020
  • Ceremony 19.11.21. at 12 noon - disputes 1.1. - 30.6.2021

The programme is the same on both days, except for the award of an honorary doctorate, which takes place on Friday 19 November.

The ceremony is streamed so that doctors, colleagues, family, and friends who cannot come to Trondheim can watch.


Safety measures to prevent infection

Black face masks will be handed out at the entrance door.

The following recommendations apply:

  1. Please disinfect your hands. Hand sanitizer will be available.
  2. Wear a face mask when you move around indoors.
    For example, this means that participants in the procession wear masks and graduates wear masks when they receive their diploma.
    Masks will also be used during the rehearsal for the ceremony.
  3. When you are sitting or eating, you can take off your mask.
  4. Face masks will be used during photography of all the participants together, but when the group photos are taken, masks will not be required.

Academic Procession

18 Thursday 

Row 1 Row 2
Rector Anne Borg Pro-Rector Marit Reitan 
Pro-Rector Tor Grande     Pro-Rector Toril Hernes
ØK Vice-Rector Gro Dæhlin
IV

MH 

IE    SU 
HF   NV    
AD    

19 Friday

Row 1 Row 2
Rector Anne Borg Pro-Rector Marit Reitan 
NTNU Honorary Award James A. Robinson    Vice-Rector Gro Dæhlin
Pro-Rector Tor Grande NTNU University Museum
NV

MH

HF   SU
AD   IV    
ØK   

 

Music: Trondhjems Studentersangforening 

  • «Gaudeamus Igitur», trad. arr. Gavin David Lee, cond. Håkon Teigen Lund
  • «Irish Blessing», Irish folk music, arr. Gavin David Lee, cond. Håkon Teigen Lund
  • «Grímur á Miðalnesi», Faeorese folk song, arr. Gard Hofshagen, cond. Håkon Teigen Lund

The Rector's speech

  • Greetings from the Rector Anne Borg 

Greetings

  • Eva Madland
  • Sina Shaddel
     
  • Aura string quartet: Frank Bridge - 3 Pieces for String Quartet: III. Allegro marcato

NTNU Honorary Award (on Friday)

  • James A. Robinson 
     
  • NTNU Brass: Marche for Queen Mary, Henry Purcell, arr. Hans Petter Stangnes

Congratulations to the new doctors

  • Pro-Rector for research, Tor Grande  

Award of doctoral degrees

  • NTNU Brass:  La Réjouissance, Georg Friedrich Händel, arr. Hans Petter Stangnes
  • Aura string quartet: Antonin Dvorak - Echo of songs, No. 3. When Your Sweet Glances on Me Fall
  • Music: Trondhjems Studentersangforening «Studentsång», text Herman Sätherberg, comp. Prins Gustaf, cond. Håkon Teigen Lund    

The official ceremony is over when the Academic Procession departs. When the official part of the ceremony is over, there will be photos taken of the procession. Afterwards, there are light refreshments.


the rector's address

Rektor Anne Borg

Greetings, newly promoted doctor

The Rector's speech Thursday 18 November:

Dear new doctors,

Congratulations! 

In the past year, 433 students completed their PhD at NTNU.  
Here, we are celebrating 107 of you today. In fact, never before have so many new doctors gathered at the same time here in the Aula for this solemn ceremony. For every one of you, it marks an important milestone, and one of the year’s really big days of celebration here at NTNU. As Rector, it is with both pride and humility that I share this occasion with you.  

Soon you will receive your doctoral diploma as tangible evidence of what you have achieved; the highest academic education one can get.  

Your doctoral degree will give authority and weight to the views you communicate. Use that authority wisely!  

This ceremony also marks the end of your education at NTNU. This does not mean your ties to NTNU will be cut from today. On the contrary! We regard you as our ambassadors and an important part of our national and international network.  

So I hope you will take good care of your contact with NTNU in your future career. You are important to us! And, let me add – NTNU and the network you have built up over the years with us will also be important to you in the years ahead.   

Above all, from today you are ambassadors of knowledge. And this we know – Knowledge needs good ambassadors, today more than ever.   

The pandemic has been a powerful reminder that knowledge can mean the difference between life and death. And that respect for knowledge can never be taken for granted. Nor can we take democratic values for granted.  

The two are close relatives, and they need us to stand up for them.  

Stand up for knowledge and democratic values with all the authority your doctorate gives you.  Contribute to open, evidence-based debate and be a clear counterweight to unqualified assumptions and ignorance. 

I am glad that in the wake of the pandemic, despite all the opposing forces, we have seen growing awareness of how important research is to society. And not least – how important it is to work together, across disciplines and national borders. The great challenges in society can only be solved through interdisciplinary efforts.  

The same applies to the greatest and most urgent of them all – climate change and the need for more sustainable development. Fighting poverty and injustice, while protecting the environment for future generations. 

Fortunately, research knows no borders. Working together with the very best academic communities, wherever they are, is vital for developing new solutions to tomorrow’s problems.  

Knowledge always makes a difference.  For individuals, for society, for the world. At NTNU, we call it Knowledge for a Better World.  

In her doctoral thesis, Cristiana Golfetto has studied various ultrasound techniques. Her research can help to detect anomalies in critical organs such as the coronary arteries, kidneys, and thyroid gland – but it can also be used to discover possible leaks in oil and gas wells.  

Nikolai Helth Gaukås has used his PhD work to develop environmentally friendly nanofilms, which can act as mini power plants inside the body by harvesting energy from the body’s mechanical movements. This allows them to extend the life of today’s pacemakers and open the way for the next generation of more complicated and energy-demanding electronic implants. 

These are two examples of knowledge that makes a difference. Many more could have been mentioned. Through your work on your own PhD, every one of you has contributed knowledge that will make a difference.  - And you have achieved that at an especially demanding time. 

There have never been any shortcuts to a doctorate. It’s about ambitions, it’s about hard work, it’s about having a goal and never letting that goal slip out of sight. As it was carved in stone in this aula more than a hundred years ago, above the entrance to the library. Per aspera ad astra – through adversity to the stars. 

Completing a PhD during a pandemic has added a solid dose of adversity. For many months, you could not travel abroad and meet your colleagues face to face. You have had to work from home, which has not given you the best possible working conditions. Many candidates have had digital or hybrid public defences. Completing a doctorate under such conditions inspires great respect!  

In our strategy, we state that knowledge provides people with opportunities and influence, as well as a foundation for making wise choices. Knowledge inspires and challenges. It changes attitudes, mindsets, and the way we see the world. Informed debate strengthens our democracy.  

Dear new doctors. You have great riches to manage. 
The knowledge you have developed and share with society will help determine what tomorrow’s society will look like.  

I wish you all the best for the future! Wherever the road takes you from here, carry on creating Knowledge for a Better World.  

Rector
Anne Borg


The Rector'speech Friday 19 November:

Dear new doctors,   

Congratulations!  

In the past year, 433 students completed their PhD at NTNU.  
Here, we are celebrating 122 of you today. In fact, never before have so many new doctors gathered at the same time here in the Aula for this solemn ceremony. For every one of you, it marks an important milestone, and one of the year’s really big days of celebration here at NTNU. As Rector, it is with both pride and humility that I share this occasion with you.  

Soon you will receive your doctoral diploma as tangible evidence of what you have achieved; the highest academic education one can get.  
Your doctoral degree will give authority and weight to the views you communicate. Use that authority wisely!  

This ceremony also marks the end of your education at NTNU. This does not mean your ties to NTNU will be cut from today. On the contrary! We regard you as our ambassadors and an important part of our national and international network.  

So I hope you will take good care of your contact with NTNU in your future career. You are important to us! And, let me add – NTNU and the network you have built up over the years with us will also be important to you in the years ahead.   

Above all, from today you are ambassadors of knowledge. And this we know – knowledge needs good ambassadors, today more than ever.   

The pandemic has been a powerful reminder that knowledge can mean the difference between life and death. And that respect for knowledge can never be taken for granted. Nor can we take democratic values for granted.  

The two are close relatives, and they need us to stand up for them.  

Stand up for knowledge and democratic values with all the authority your doctorate gives you.  Contribute to open, evidence-based debate and be a clear counterweight to unqualified assumptions and ignorance. 

I am glad that in the wake of the pandemic, despite all the opposing forces, we have seen growing awareness of how important research is to society. And not least – how important it is to work together, across disciplines and national borders. The great challenges in society can only be solved through interdisciplinary efforts.  

The same applies to the greatest and most urgent of them all. Climate change and the need for more sustainable development. Fighting poverty and injustice, while protecting the environment for future generations. 

Fortunately, research knows no borders. Working together with the very best academic communities, wherever they are, is vital for developing new solutions to tomorrow’s problems.  

Knowledge always makes a difference.  For individuals, for society, for the world. At NTNU, we call it Knowledge for a Better World.  

Gunn Berit Neergård has researched how nurses can discover and tackle problems – what she calls entrepreneurial nursing. Her research could help nurses to drive development in the health service themselves, contributing to positive changes.  
 
Tina Ringstad has researched structures and mechanisms of the human language faculty – and systematized differences between the language of children and adults. Through insight into which aspects of language must be learned and which are innate, this research can help in assessing atypical language development and understanding how we acquire language. 

These are two examples of knowledge that makes a difference. Many more could have been mentioned. Through your work on your own PhD, every one of you has contributed knowledge that will make a difference. - And you have achieved that at an especially demanding time. 

There have never been any shortcuts to a doctorate. It’s about ambitions, it’s about hard work, it’s about having a goal and never letting that goal slip out of sight. As it was carved in stone in this aula more than a hundred years ago, above the entrance to the library. Per aspera ad astra – through adversity to the stars. 

Completing a PhD during a pandemic has added a solid dose of adversity. For many months, you could not travel abroad and meet your colleagues face to face. You have had to work from home, which has not given you the best possible working conditions. Many candidates have had digital or hybrid public defences. Completing a doctorate under such conditions inspires great respect!  

In our strategy, we state that knowledge provides people with opportunities and influence, as well as a foundation for making wise choices. Knowledge inspires and challenges. It changes attitudes, mindsets, and the way we see the world. Informed debate strengthens our democracy.  

Dear new doctors. You have great riches to manage. 
The knowledge you have developed and share with society will help determine what tomorrow’s society will look like.  

I wish you all the best for the future! Wherever the road takes you from here, carry on creating Knowledge for a Better World.  

Rector
Anne Borg

 

the artwork

​​​​​​​The artwork included with the diploma is by Anita Irene Wollamo.

The artwork

The artwork included with the diploma is by Anita Irene Wollamo.

Anita Irene Wollamo (born 1968) is a Norwegian visual artist, born in Malvik and living in Trondheim. She graduated from the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art, and her main field of study was painting.

Wollamo's art is a direct imprint of leaves, needles, and branches from trees in Høyskoleparken at Gløshaugen in Trondheim. The trees are rowan and ash, well-known from Norse mythology, widespread in Norway and Europe, and a cembra pine native to central mountain areas in Europe, especially the Alps. The artist is concerned about the importance of green areas in cities. With this work, the doctors will have a piece of the park on their way through life.

The piece is a cyanotype made using a technique developed by Sir John Herschel 1842, where the image appears after exposure to sunlight. Two chemicals are used in the development process, and together they create the colour Prussian blue. Biologists used this method to document the various species they found in the field. Engineers used the process well into the 20th century to produce blueprint copies of drawings.

 

NTNU Honorary Award

NTNU Honorary Award 2021

James A. Robinson

James A. Robinson is the institute director at The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts, and one of nine university professors at the University of Chicago. He holds his PhD from Yale, and has close to 100,000 citations at Google Scholar. 

Robinson is among the world's most influential social scientists over the last two decades, where he has shaped political science, history and economics by studying the possibly biggest social science question of them all: Why are some countries successful while others are not? Together with Daron Acemoglu from MIT, he is the foremost advocate that differences between countries are primarily due to their different quality of institutions. In the book Why Nations Fail, he has also shown an ability to communicate his world leading research to wide audiences. 

Robinson also shows that good institutions are not in everyone's interest. Typically, economic and political power can be gathered in too few hands - and weak institutions are a political tool for those who monopolize power. Robinson does not limit himself to study how institutions affect societies, but also studies how societies affect institutions.

Robinson has been collaborating with NTNU since 2002, and has numerous visits to NTNU behind him. He has 12 joint international publications with Department of Economics, including papers in leading international journals. He has invited faculty and several PhD students from the Department for longer stays of research at Harvard and Chicago.