BFA and MFA in Fine Art

Bachelor of Fine Art (BFA) and Master of Fine Art (MFA)

The education offered by the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art (KIT) focuses first and foremost on the artistic and personal progress of students. Our teaching is based on openness, dialogue and critical reflection, where students move freely in a flexible environment. With support from instructors and guest lecturers from different artistic orientations and backgrounds, the students explore and challenge artistic boundaries, learn, reflect and act. The Academy is actively engaged in an international contemporary art milieu and has working relationships with artists, critics, curators and theorists from across the globe.

The Trondheim Academy of Fine Art is a department in the Faculty of Architecture and Fine Art at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and is one of three higher educational institutions in Norway offering courses in Fine Art. KIT is the only Norwegian art academy in the university system. This provides unique resources and opportunities for collaboration with other faculties, such as engineering, architecture and the humanities.

Bachelor of Fine Art (BFA)
The duration of the Bachelor of Fine Art course is three years, and results in the award of a BFA degree. Students who successfully complete their BFA degrees are eligible to apply for admission to the two-year Master of Fine Art programme.

The core of the academy's instruction is based on one-on-one discussions between teacher and student, but group discussion also plays a central role. Students are not formally divided into departments, but orient themselves according to the studio areas and teaching staff that best suit the development of their practise. The Academy has an open structure, which allows students to migrate between different areas of study, comprised of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography and intermedia.

Each student has a personal tutor, but all are encouraged to discuss their work with different members of the academic staff. Both staff and students participate in group discussions of the students' work. These are held the school's gallery in conjunction with small shows that are arranged most weeks. A comprehensive programme of visiting artists and lecturers provides the basis for lively discussion and for a plurality of viewpoints.

The teaching of theory is, as much as possible, integrated into the teaching programme in general, with a firm emphasis on the theory and practise of contemporary art. Lectures, seminars and courses that combine both practical and theoretical work form the basis for developing a critical understanding of art, rooted in the student's own practise.

The student's work is evaluated every six months, with the evaluation based on dialogues between tutor and student, participation in student exhibitions and attendance at lectures, seminars and courses. Students are required to take part in semester exhibitions and the group discussions associated with those exhibitions.

The first year of study is comprised of a variety of introductory courses in technique, philosophy (examen philosophicum) and related courses. A study tour is arranged to provide students with first-hand experience of major museums and galleries. Students also travel to a major art event designed to give them a common frame of reference, and are provided time to develop their own work.

In their second year, students are allowed to concentrate more on their own work. Students may also take advantage of exchange programmes with other academies in the Nordic countries or in Europe.

Students in their third year take part in a graduation exhibition in the KIT Gallery, which marks the completion of the course of study. The students plan and develop the exhibition together with an internal coordinator, and the exhibition is evaluated by an external sensor.

Master of Fine Art (MFA)
The duration of the Master of Fine Art course is two years, and results in the award of an MFA degree. During this time, students develop their own artistic work from a conceptual, theoretical and practical perspective.

The core of the academy's instruction is based on one-on-one discussions between teacher and student, but group discussion also plays a central role. Students are not formally divided into departments, but orient themselves according to the studio areas and teaching staff that best suit the development of their practise. The Academy has an open structure, which allows students to migrate between different areas of study, comprised of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography and intermedia.

Each student has a personal tutor, but all are encouraged to discuss their work with different members of the academic staff. Both staff and students participate in group discussions of the students' work. These discussions are held the school's gallery in conjunction with small shows that are arranged most weeks. A comprehensive programme of visiting artists and lecturers provides the basis for lively discussion and for a plurality of viewpoints.

The teaching of theory is, as far as possible, integrated into the teaching programme in general, with a firm emphasis on the theory and practise of contemporary art. Lectures, seminars and courses that combine both practical and theoretical work form the basis for developing a critical understanding of art, rooted in the student's own practise.

The student's work is evaluated every six months, with the evaluation based on dialogues between tutor and student, participation in student exhibitions and attendance at lectures, seminars and courses. Students are required to take part in semester exhibitions and the group discussions associated with those exhibitions.

Students in their final year of MFA take part in a graduation exhibition which marks the completion of their study. The MFA exhibition is a professional presentation of work that signals the transition from student to practising artist. It is held at the Trondheim Museum of Fine Art, with an external advisor/curator appointed each year to co-ordinate the final exhibition. The exhibition is evaluated by an external sensor.