News at Ocean School of Innovation

Online course on Intellectual Property and Intellectual Property Rights for NTNU Oceans

House of Knowledge in cooperation with Ocean School of Innovation are happy to offer a free on-demand-bite-size course on intellectual property (IP) for 20 participants. 30 modules of 1-5 minutes, do a few each day to build awareness step by step

Online course on Intellectual Property and Intellectual Property Rights for NTNU Oceans

House of Knowledge in cooperation with Ocean School of Innovation are happy to offer a free on-demand-bite-size course on intellectual property (IP) for 20 participants. 30 modules of 1-5 minutes, do a few each day to build awareness step by step

Here you can explore following topics:
  • IP basics
  • Who owns the rights to your research and technology?
  • What/who protects it?
  • Patenting of technology
  • IP protection during meetings

 

We have limited number of course spots at this time, so please register for the course if you are seriously interested.

Registration at: https://osintnu.hooks.works/

Use your NTNU e-mail when registering your user.

You get an activation e-mail, and you are ready to learn

(Activation e-mail only sent to NTNU e-mail addresses)

How can I be a part of big digitalization projects?

Ocean School of Innovation in cooperation with Webstep innvites to meeetup for academics, technology experts, startup staff and other interested under Trondheim Playgroud (30 August - 05 September)

How can I be a part of big digitalization projects?

Ocean School of Innovation in cooperation with Webstep innvites to meeetup for academics, technology experts, startup staff and other interested under Trondheim Playgroud (30 August - 05 September)

Digitalization is rapidly changing how industries create value and how they compete. Some argues that digitalization is even rewriting the DNA of the business. Many companies need to adjust to this changing landscape to survive in the marked. Some analytics mean that global market for digital consumer products is highly overfilled, while the utilization of deep tech in still low. This opens opportunity for specialized academics and technologists to make use of their findings in a new, digital world.

That raises questions on what the role of technology experts in large digitalization project is,  how can academics contribute, and how may new knowledge be utilized in a digital context? What are the largest digital trends and what technologies and solutions should professionals focus on?

One of the best persons who can answer these issues is Save Asmervik from Webstep. He has participated in many large projects related to digitalization the last couple of years. During the meetup he will share his knowledge and highlight current state-of-the-art within the digital technology, the role of deep tech, and the different digital business models.

OSI presentation workshop

“Be concise, efficient and engage with the audience”, this was the advice given to the participants when Ocean School of Innovation hosted a presentation workshop to advise young and promising researchers how to pitch ideas and present their research in an easy and exciting way.

OSI presentation workshop

“Be concise, efficient and engage with the audience”, this was the advice given to the participants when Ocean School of Innovation hosted a presentation workshop to advise young and promising researchers how to pitch ideas and present their research in an easy and exciting way.

An important skill for every innovative scientist is the ability to present the research results for an audience of peers, but if you want to turn your research into new innovations, then you must also be able to present your results to people who might not have the same knowledge of the topic as you have. 

You can have a great idea that is backed up by ground breaking research, but if you are unable to present it in a way that excites investors and potential partners, you will have a hard time getting your innovation to the market.

The participants were advised on their presentation techniques by Elise Matilde Lund who works with science communication at Vitenparken Campus Ås, where she advices on how to transform food and environmental research into experiences for a wider audience.

To Lund, the goal is to use images to help convey your message in the best possible way, and she highlights three tools that the presenter has available: the images, the spoken word, and the body language.

- You want to be as visual as possible. Which is why I dare you to avoid any text, bullet points, collage, heavy graphs and pointless statistics, Lund told the researchers.

Each participant at the workshop was challenged to prepare a talk that focused audience’s attention on presenters and true content instead on presentation text. The other participants would then provide feedback to these “lightning talks”. Lund says that the short amount of time allotted to each presentation force the participants to present their topic in a very concise way, and to focus on the most important messages and the best attention grabbers.

- If I have a big picture with a lot of information then it will divide the audience’s attention. Cut the picture or graph down to only the essentials. You can’t show the whole complex picture in less than 7 minutes, so it is better to focus on a good presentation rather than try to explain every nuance, says Lund.

She also advised the participants use their own experiences to catch the audience and to try to calm down before any presentation.

- Be personal but not private, use words that people understand, and make sure to breath. If you are stressed during the presentation then the stress will transfer to the audience, stress is contagious, says Lund.

New start for Ocean School of Innovation

On February 26th,  Ocean School of Innovation hosted a meetup for young researchers on the topic “Essential Innovation”. This is the first meetup arranged by OSI for some time, and we were very happy to see so many promising new researchers turn up.

New start for Ocean School of Innovation

On February 26th,  Ocean School of Innovation hosted a meetup for young researchers on the topic “Essential Innovation”. This is the first meetup arranged by OSI for some time, and we were very happy to see so many promising new researchers turn up.

The meetup focused on challenges and rarely discussed topics that are very relevant for innovative researchers:

  • How does innovation relate to alternative carrier options after PhD defence? What does different “innovation” pathways look like? What does it actually mean? And why is it worth efforts?
  • How can we identify innovation opportunities in our research?
  • How to refine our fuzzy ideas to something that is interesting in the market?

The participants got an introduction to research driven innovation by Oceans Innovation Leader, Kjell Olav Skjølsvik, a long time veteran of innovation in Ocean-based industry, who clarified the term innovation, and explained that there are many different ways for researchers to innovate.

The participants also got excellent advice from Kim Lynge Sørensen, Kasper Trolle Borup, and Stian Skjong who talked about their experience with innovation.

Skjong works for SINTEF and has implemented his research in ongoing innovation projects with established industry, while Sørensen and Borup have established their own start-up company.

For Sørensen and Borup, one of the most important thing to remember when starting a new company is that it needs to add value. They think that many scientists are so focused on their research that they forget that the product needs to sell.

– Your success depends on the value your tech adds to someone, not the level of ingenuity involved in the creating the tech. You may have the most neat and clever mathematical proof for why it should work, but the truth is that nobody outside your field is going to care. This also goes the other way around, you can create tech that is not based on mind-boggling research that can result in a very successful company. If you take a step back and try to understand what value it will bring, then maybe shifting your focus by a few degrees is enough to have a large impact, says the two entrepreneurs.  

They also told the participants that they should be prepared for failure, and that investors will reject you, often again and again.

– If someone rejects you or turns you down it has probably has nothing to do with you personally. It simply means that either your pitch wasn’t good enough, that your tech isn’t where it needs to be, or external factors that you have no control over got in the way. Get back up, evaluate, refine, and go at it again. It’s an iterative process, where a rejection is good, because you get the chance to incrementally learn something new and do something better, says Sørensen and Borup.

They also advised budding entrepreneurs to team up, as it is impossible to be good at everything, and you need great staff and partners to succeed. Despite all of these challenges to new start-ups, their final message for the audience was to go for it.

With respect to the questions raised prior to the workshop Sørensen, Borup and Skjong definitely provided new insight for our young researchers. Although innovation comes in many shapes and forms, finding the benefit for someone of your research is a key to establishing the first interest from industry or investors.

Translating your research to an innovation will introduce new challenges and others will have a different view than you. Test your thoughts and ideas about the usefulness of your research on your closest resources and network to refine and improve your idea. The fun part of innovation is the creative process, and this could be an exciting starting point for the next step in your career.

In the end, the speakers all emphasised one important point, if you have a chance to push forward your research after PhD, then you should do it!

– It will be the most excruciating, frustrating, rewarding, fulfilling, hopeless, euphoric experience of your life. Take the chance, as it is definitely worth it, says Sørensen and Borup.

INNOVATION AT NTNU OCEANS

From research to impact:

Innovation in the ocean space

Research outcome from NTNU Oceans will support innovations for a sustainable oceans development.

The objectives for innovation activities in NTNU Oceans are:

  • Development of competence and culture for innovation
  • Identify business opportunities for new and existing industry based on results from our research
  • Share our contribution to the development of the ocean industries

Sustainable Oceans need creative ideas, new research,
innovations and people that see possibilities.

  • Is your research related to the oceans?
  • Can your research help you do something noone has done before?
  • Will you like to see your ideas develop into a future innovation?

 

Take a chance!
Be part of Ocean School of Innovation that supports your innovative thinking, personal and research-idea development. Contact us: krzysztof.j.zieba@ntnu.no