Department of Biology

The strategy of the Department of Biology is to understand biological processes of life to preserve the environment. The Department has an interdisciplinary approach to education and research that is deeply rooted in environmental biology. The Department has academic and research activities in the following disciplines: molecular biology, cell biology, systems biology, plant physiology, zoophysiology, neurobiology, ethology, ecology, evolution, marine biology, aquaculture, biodiversity and environmental toxicology.
    
The Department is organized in sections: the Ecology, Ethology and Evolution (EEE) section, the Physiology, Environmental toxicology and Biotechnology (PEB) section, and the Marine science (MS) section.
    
The focus is on fundamental biological research and the implications and use of this knowledge for society. We offer researchers and students an exciting working environment and modern facilities at the Science Building (Realfagbygget), and at Trondheim Biological Station and SeaLab. The Departments has several field stations, in Norway, in Svalbard and in Tanzania. The various research groups are also engaged in field studies the Arctic and the Antarctic, Africa, Europe, Australia.


Newstalk and events

Elephant populations continue to dwindle in Tanzania.

An elephant does not die from one broken rib.

Or so says an African proverb. But elephants certainly suffer in greater numbers the closer they are to people, according to a study of these usually gentle giants in and near Tanzania's iconic Serengeti National Park. The 5,700-square-mile park, established in 1951 and later designated a UNESCO World Heritage site (1981), is home to some 2,000 African elephants, Loxodonta africana, the largest terrestrial animals alive today.

Evolutionary biologist Eivin Røskaft. Photo: Per Harald Olsen/NTNUHow well do elephants fare when they're close to humans? To find out, ecologists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) conducted research from March through July 2010 in more than 6,000 square miles of Tanzanian savanna and woodland. The team, led by evolutionary biologist Eivin Røskaft, hoped to learn whether elephants fare better inside Serengeti National Park than in the adjoining and heavily human-populated Grumeti Game Reserve and Fort Ikoma Open Area.

Natural History, March 2014: Down for the Count

Elephant populations continue to dwindle in Tanzania.

An elephant does not die from one broken rib.

Or so says an African proverb. But elephants certainly suffer in greater numbers the closer they are to people, according to a study of these usually gentle giants in and near Tanzania's iconic Serengeti National Park. The 5,700-square-mile park, established in 1951 and later designated a UNESCO World Heritage site (1981), is home to some 2,000 African elephants, Loxodonta africana, the largest terrestrial animals alive today.

Evolutionary biologist Eivin Røskaft. Photo: Per Harald Olsen/NTNUHow well do elephants fare when they're close to humans? To find out, ecologists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) conducted research from March through July 2010 in more than 6,000 square miles of Tanzanian savanna and woodland. The team, led by evolutionary biologist Eivin Røskaft, hoped to learn whether elephants fare better inside Serengeti National Park than in the adjoining and heavily human-populated Grumeti Game Reserve and Fort Ikoma Open Area.

Natural History, March 2014: Down for the Count

How well do elephants fare when they're close to humans? To find out, ecologists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) conducted research from March through July 2010 in more than 6,000 square miles of Tanzanian savanna and woodland. Photo: Per Harald Olsen/NTNU

Phytoplankton Pigments
Characterization, Chemotaxonomy and Applications in Oceanography

Edited by: Suzanne Roy, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski
Edited by: Carole Llewellyn, Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Edited by: Einar Skarstad Egeland, Bodø University College, Norway
Edited by: Geir Johnsen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim

Phytoplankton Pigments Characterization, Chemotaxonomy and Applications in Oceanography