Department of Biology

The strategy of the Department of Biology is to understand biological processes of life to preserve the environment. The Department has an interdisciplinary approach to education and research that is deeply rooted in environmental biology. The Department has academic and research activities in the following disciplines: molecular biology, cell biology, systems biology, plant physiology, zoophysiology, neurobiology, ethology, ecology, evolution, marine biology, aquaculture, biodiversity and environmental toxicology.
    
The Department is organized in sections: the Ecology, Ethology and Evolution (EEE) section, the Physiology, Environmental toxicology and Biotechnology (PEB) section, and the Marine science (MS) section.
    
The focus is on fundamental biological research and the implications and use of this knowledge for society. We offer researchers and students an exciting working environment and modern facilities at the Science Building (Realfagbygget), and at Trondheim Biological Station and SeaLab. The Departments has several field stations, in Norway, in Svalbard and in Tanzania. The various research groups are also engaged in field studies the Arctic and the Antarctic, Africa, Europe, Australia.


Newstalk and events

Big-brained birds less likely to die in traffic

Some bird species seem to collide with cars more often than others, a phenomenon that is poorly understood. To find out the importance of the birds' brain size in traffic behaviour,...

Big-brained birds less likely to die in traffic

Some bird species seem to collide with cars more often than others, a phenomenon that is poorly understood.

To find out the importance of the birds' brain size in traffic behaviour, researchers from Nord-Trøndelag University College (HINT) and Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have investigated 3,700 birds of 11 different species in Norway.

ScienceNordic, March 2014: Big-brained birds less likely to die in traffic

Blue Tit [Parus caeruleus] Photo: Per Harald Olsen/NTNU

Is the Serengeti safe? Ask an elephant.

Imagine walking through a city at night. If you're familiar with it, you know which parts of the urban jungle are perilous. To steer clear of trouble, you avoid them. Could it be the same...

Is the Serengeti safe? Ask an elephant.

Imagine walking through a city at night. If you're familiar with it, you know which parts of the urban jungle are perilous. To steer clear of trouble, you avoid them. Could it be the same in iconic places like Tanzania's Serengeti National Park? The best way to find out, scientists have discovered, may be to ask the elephants. These gentle behemoths of the savanna have figured out where danger is – and where it usually isn't.

Eivin Røskaft. Photo: Per Harald Olsen/NTNUElephants' stress hormones, whether inside or outside the park, mirror the amount of human activity. "Somehow," says Røskaft, "elephants must ‘know' when they're in an area that could be a risk." The biologists are also looking at stress in elephants in Tanzania's Selous Game Reserve and in Northern Namibia, as well as in impalas, or African antelopes, in the Serengeti.

africa geographic. April 2014: Is the Serengeti safe? Ask an elephant.

Elephants' stress hormones, whether inside or outside the park, mirror the amount of human activity. Photo: Per Harald Olsen/NTNU

 

Phytoplankton Pigments
Characterization, Chemotaxonomy and Applications in Oceanography

Edited by: Suzanne Roy, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski
Edited by: Carole Llewellyn, Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Edited by: Einar Skarstad Egeland, Bodø University College, Norway
Edited by: Geir Johnsen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim

Phytoplankton Pigments Characterization, Chemotaxonomy and Applications in Oceanography