Podcast: 63 Degrees North

Podcast: 63 Degrees North

– Science, history and innovation from Europe's outer edge

Bilde

Close-up of iceberg. Foto with text: 63 degrees north.

Intro

We bring you surprising stories of science, history and innovation from 63 Degrees North, the home of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), and from its campuses in Trondheim, Ålesund and Gjøvik.

Listen as we explore the mysteries of the polar night, the history of Viking raiders, and how geologists and engineers are working to save the planet, one carbon dioxide molecule at a time — and more. Take a journey to Europe's outer edge for fascinating tales and remarkable discoveries. Hosted by Nancy Bazilchuk.

Season 2 of the podcast 63 Degrees North

Season Two – 2022

Episode 10: The Alchemists: Turning wild water into white coal

Episode 10: The Alchemists: Turning wild water into white coal

The secrets behind how Norwegian scientists and engineers harnessed the country’s wild waterfalls by developing super efficient turbines — and how advances in turbine technology being developed now may be the future in a zero-carbon world. They include an engineer who figured out how to harness national fervour and build the 1900s equivalent of a super computer, a WWII resistance fighter who saw something special in tiny temperature differences, and researchers today, who are finding ways to cut environmental impacts from current hydropower plants and craft the designs we need to confront climate change.

Read more: Episode 10 details| Episode 10 transcript


Episode 9: The Detectives: Hunting toxic chemicals in the Arctic

Episode 9: The Detectives: Hunting toxic chemicals in the Arctic

Baby grey seals. Polar bears. Zooplankton on painkillers. How do toxic chemicals and substances end up in Arctic animals — and as it happens, native people, too?

Read more: Episode 9 details | Episode 9 transcript


Episode 8: Hermann Göring’s Luftwaffe and the $6 billion deal

Episode 8: Hermann Göring’s Luftwaffe and the $6 billion deal

How the unlikely combination of WWII Germany, a modest English engineer who created a worker’s paradise, an ambitious industrialist prosecuted as a traitor and a hardworking PhD helped build modern Norway, one aluminium ingot at a time.

Read more: Episode 8 details | Episode 8 transcript


Episode 7: Pirates, noblewomen and bicycling housewives

Episode 7: Pirates, noblewomen and bicycling housewives

Why Norway always ranks among the top countries on the planet when it comes to gender equality.

Read more: Episode 7 details | Episode 7 transcript


Episode 6: Old Bones and Modern Germs

Episode 6: Old Bones and Modern Germs

Season Two premiere

What can medieval skeletons tell us about modern-day pandemics? Trondheim, Norway’s first religious and national capital, has a rich history that has been revealed over decades of archaeological excavations.  Rsearchers are using this collection to see if insights into the health conditions of the past can shed light on pandemics in our own time.  With the help of old bones, latrine wastes and dental plaque, researchers are learning about how diseases evolved in medieval populations, and what society did to stem them — and how that might help us in the future. 

Read more: Episode 6 details | Episode 6 transcript


Podcasts in Norwegian

Season 1 of the podcast 63 Degrees North

Season One – 2021

Episode 5: Darwin had Galapagos finches. Norway has… house sparrows?

Episode 5: Darwin had Galapagos finches. Norway has… house sparrows?

The different species of Galapagos finches, with their specially evolved beaks that allow them to eat very specific types of food, helped Darwin understand that organisms can evolve over time to better survive in their environment. Nearly 200 years later and thousands of miles away, Norwegian biologists are learning some surprising lessons about evolution from northern Norwegian populations of the humble house sparrow.

Read more: Episode 5 details | Episode 5 transcript


Episode 4: Not enough COVID-19 tests? No problem, we'll make them!

Episode 4: Not enough COVID-19 tests? No problem, we'll make them!

When the coronavirus first transformed from a weird respiratory disease centered in Wuhan,China to a global pandemic, no one was really prepared. Worldwide, no one had enough masks, personal protective gear and definitely — not enough tests. The problem was especially acute in places like Norway, a small country that had to compete on a global market to get anything and everything. What happened when a genetics researcher,some engineers and a couple of PhDs and postdocs put their heads together to design a completely different kind of coronavirus test— and how it changed lives in India, Denmark and Nepal.

Read more: Episode 4 details | Episode 4 transcript


Episode 3: The Longship that could help save the planet

Episode 3: The Longship that could help save the planet

Everyone knows there’s just too much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere —and we’re heating up the planet at an unprecedented pace. More than 20 years ago, Norwegians helped pioneer an approach to dealing with CO2 that’s still ongoing today— they captured it and pumped it into a rock formation deep under the sea. Now the Norwegian government is building on those decades of experience with a large-scale carbon capture and storage project called Longship. Will it work? Is it safe? And is it something that other countries can benefit from, too?

Read more: Episode 3 details | Episode 3 transcript


Episode 2: Viking raiders stole this box – but the real surprise is what they did with it

Episode 2: Viking raiders stole this box – but the real surprise is what they did with it

It’s no bigger than four decks of cards stacked one on top of the other — a tiny box raided from an Irish church. In Ireland, the box held the holy remains of a saint. What a mound of sand, some leftover nails and the box itself tell us about the Viking raiders who stole it — and what they did with it when they brought it back to Norway.

Read more: Episode 2 details | Episode 2 transcript


Episode 1: Shedding light – on the polar night

Episode 1: Shedding light – on the polar night

Krill eyeballs. The werewolf effect. Diel vertical migration. Arctic marine biologists really talk about these things, because in the darkest dark of the polar night, it turns out that fish, birds and tiny marine organisms are far more active than researchers ever imagined. Even the faintest light of the moon has an effect. Aaahoooo! The werewolf effect!

Read more: Episode 1 details | Episode 1 transcript


Sneak peak – Welcome to 63 Degrees North!

Sneak peak – Welcome to 63 Degrees North!

Ever wonder what's happening in some of the more far-flung places on the planet? In 63 Degrees North, we'll bring you stories from Norway every week about surprising science, little-known history, and technology and engineering discoveries that can help change the world.