Master's degree programme, 2 years

Globalization and Sustainable Development

– Career Prospects

This Master's programme is designed to provide its students with the specialist knowledge and transferable skills to pursue careers in global corporations, non-governmental organizations or with international campaigning groups.

Students on our internship programme currently have the opportunity to work in a variety of industrial contexts, including the telecommunication, oil and shipping sectors, for a variety of global NGOs, working on environmental, health and educational issues and with multilateral institutions such as the UN, as well as in local government.


 

Student interviews


Be strategic, but choose something you like and feel motivated to engage with

Name: Caroline Tissot
Study program: MSc in Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2017
Workplace: International Development Norway
Position: Project Manager

The global and transnational perspective I've acquired with the diversity of the program (and of my class) and the skills (especially research, academic writing, cultural and knowledge management) are present in my daily routine at work.

Be strategic, but choose something you like and feel motivated to engage with

Name: Caroline Tissot
Study program: MSc in Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2017
Workplace: International Development Norway
Position: Project Manager

The global and transnational perspective I've acquired with the diversity of the program (and of my class) and the skills (especially research, academic writing, cultural and knowledge management) are present in my daily routine at work.

Caroline TissotWhat are you working with?

IDN works  with business-oriented projects contributing to sustainable local economic development in various countries (mostly CEE). Together with local partners in the countries we are working with, we run the whole project lifecycle, from idea phase, design, management, expert tasks and reporting/closing. 

What is the best part of your job?

The possibility to learn about different fields while bringing my social sciences background to more traditional contexts. I have been engaged with IDN from August 2015, and since then I have worked with projects related to gender issues, migration, sustainability (circular economy, eco-villages, green transportation), inclusion of disadvantged groups , to mention some. Hence while working with development projects here, I changed my perception of 'either'/'or': I realized it is possible to work with what I have studied for so long and feel identified with at the same time I contribute to bring a positive impact to the societies involved. 

How did you get the job after your studies?

IDN was the place where I did my Globalization internship, and I have been working here since then. The internship I found through NTNU Bridge.

In what way do you use your expertise from your studies in your job?

In every possible way! The courses I have taken are very useful when it comes to knowledge background and to aplying a social science lens to what I do. But most of all, the global and transnational perspective I've acquired with the diversity of the program (and of my class) and the skills (especially research, academic writing, cultural and knowledge management) are present in my daily routine at work. 

Your best job- and career advice to our students? 

Be strategic when choosing your internship place and your thesis'  topic, but more important than that, choose something you like and feel motivated to engage with. I believe that when we are so young, more important than have a(ny) job, is to take time to discover our talents and what moves us. And the Globalization program provides a great structure for that: there are such a variety of courses, of professors with different profiles, an engaged staff and, more than that, your classmates. Trondheim has an unique volunteering environment (UKA, Isfit, ESN and plenty of other organisations), so be out there and engage yourself (all employers value volunteer work a lot!) - remember the importance of networking. These are all 'tools' you can use to learn more about yourself and explore different possibilities. Above all, always have an open mind, be humble, and don't forget to have fun :)


The EITI is an anti-corruption body that works to improve the governance of the oil, gas and mining sectors

Name: Synøve Almås
Study program: MSc in Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2017
Workplace: The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative
Position: Communications Intern

Out of 25 employees, we are 4 Norwegians and the rest are from all over the world. That makes this job very interesting, with so many different perspectives coming together to make the world a better place.

The EITI is an anti-corruption body that works to improve the governance of the oil, gas and mining sectors

Name: Synøve Almås
Study program: MSc in Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2017
Workplace: The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative
Position: Communications Intern

Out of 25 employees, we are 4 Norwegians and the rest are from all over the world. That makes this job very interesting, with so many different perspectives coming together to make the world a better place.

Synnøve AlmåsWhat are you working with?

The EITI is an anti-corruption body that works to improve the governance of the oil, gas and mining sectors. I work in the communications department and my work days are very varied. I spend a lot of time writing news pieces, blogs, and other publications. Social media is also part of my job tasks. Other minor tasks like updating our webpage and answering emails is also part of it. In addition, I have been fortunate to work with policy issues in the Middle East and North African countries that implement the EITI Standard.

What is the best part of your job?

The best part is the international environment that I work in. Out of 25 employees, we are 4 Norwegians and the rest are from all over the world. That makes this job very interesting, with so many different perspectives coming together to make the world a better place. It also makes up a very good social environment.

How did you get the job after your studies?

I wrote my master thesis on the EITI, which gave me a great advantage when applying for a job here. They happened to have an internship available right when I finished university, and voila! Here I am. It also helped that I had done an internship abroad whilst studying, giving me experience both in policy work and in an international environment.

In what way do you use your expertise from your studies in your job? 

The work we do is related to globalisation in all aspects. The policy issues that the EITI deal with include migration, environment, gender and local communities. It is about giving power back to citizens instead of large global corporates and governments. I recognise a lot of the issues from my master studies. Right now, I’m working on a brief on the extractives and gender, and I actually used one able to use the curriculum from one of the courses I took! It’s also good to be fluent in English, which is the working language of the EITI.

Your best job- and career advice to our students?

Make your education relevant for a career! I was lucky, and wrote my master thesis on an organisation based in Oslo who offer internships. Be a bit strategic when choosing courses and topics, and you’ll land your first job. That means the hardest part is done, and you can move on to other positions later on, but it’s that first experience that is hard to get. It’s always good to keep the longer term in mind. I would also advice to get experience beyond your studies, be it volunteer positions or a part-time job.


The internship experience from my studies seemed helpful in finding a job

Name: Siri Solheim-Kristiansen
Study Program: MSc Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2015
Employer: Trondheim Red Cross
Title: Coordinator

My contribution can make someone feel more at home in Trondheim, and maybe get a new acquaintance or friend. 

The internship experience from my studies seemed helpful in finding a job

Name: Siri Solheim-Kristiansen
Study Program: MSc Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2015
Employer: Trondheim Red Cross
Title: Coordinator

My contribution can make someone feel more at home in Trondheim, and maybe get a new acquaintance or friend. 

Siri Solheim KristiansenWhat are your working with?

Right now, I work mainly with two projects; refugee guide and tour group. The refugee guidance activity facilitates Norwegians and refugees to meet, thus contributing to increased inclusion and networking. In addition, it is very social. The tour group is another social activity that allows people of all ages and from the corners of the world who are represented in Trondheim to meet in Norwegian nature.

What's the best part of your job?

It is definitely that my contribution can make someone feel more at home in Trondheim, and maybe get a new acquaintance or friend. I also meet many people and hear their stories, giving a little perspective on life and everyday life.

How did you get the job after the studies?

I searched. I was volunteering in the Red Cross during the studies, I believe it helped a little.

In what way do you use your expertise from your studies in your job?

My studies gave good insight into political, social, cultural and economic trends in the world today, and this is good background knowledge in a job within the migration field. The internship experience from my studies seemed helpful in finding a job.


There is far more room in the workplace for geographers and social scientists than you realise.

Name: David Collins
Education/ study program: MSc in Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2014
Workplace: NTNU – Faculty of Architecture and Design – The Department of Architecture and Planning
Position: Ph.D. Fellow in Sustainable Facilties Management

 I work as a social scientist but very much through an Architectural lens.

There is far more room in the workplace for geographers and social scientists than you realise.

Name: David Collins
Education/ study program: MSc in Globalization
Graduated from NTNU: 2014
Workplace: NTNU – Faculty of Architecture and Design – The Department of Architecture and Planning
Position: Ph.D. Fellow in Sustainable Facilties Management

 I work as a social scientist but very much through an Architectural lens.

David Collins

What are you working with?

My Ph.D. project is looking at the barriers and drivers when developing sustainable buildings, and more specifically office buildings. As well as Ph.D. research I also teach Master students on the Real Estate Development program. I am also a Master thesis supervisor along with dabbling in various other things.

What is the best part of your job?

Easily it is the ability to use my social sciences background in the context of architecture. The Globalization Master was multidisciplinary by it’s very nature, which gave me a valuable ‘vocational toolbox’ to apply my academic field to another field where it doesn’t traditionally fit.

How did you get the job after your studies?

I was proactive in looking for a position during the last couple of months of my course. The plan was do a Ph.D. from the very beginning, so I kept an eye out on sites like Jobb Norge from around the January. I was very lucky that a position relevant to my skill came up at just the right time. I also cannot underestimate the value of my Globalization internship. I worked for SINTEF and for the first time in my life I looked at buildings (my previous work history was in politics), and without this part of the program there is no way I would have been drawn to this Ph.D. program, nor would I have been qualified. The Master completely changed my career trajectory, and 100% for the better!

In what way do you use your expertise from your studies in your job? 

I use them every single day! I work as a social scientist but very much through an Architectural lens. In my Globalization studies were always challenged by the multidisciplinary nature of the course. This required that students constantly think malleably about they could best apply their knowledge skill to all sorts of academic contexts. In my job I am one day working with Architects, another day with Engineers, and even geographers! Without the multidisciplinarity of the Globalization Master I am not convinced that I would be as good as I am at working with people with this variety of  different skills. In a world where this sort of situation will be more common, this sort of thinking is absolutely vita.

Your best job- and career advice to our students?

Play to the strengths of your background. There is far more room in the workplace for geographers and social scientists than you realise. You are very employable to make sure that you focus on that. Secondly, decide what you want to do next as soon as possible. Make sure that from year one you are selecting courses, making contacts and picking an internship that will best lead you to what you hope to do next. Following on from that, use your internship for all it is worth. Make contacts, learn crazy new skills you would never learn elsewhere, and (as in my case) seize the opportunity to engage with a discipline you never thought would be interesting or relevant to your life and career. An open minded attitude to my internship completely changed my life and has put me in a golden career position that I would never have though  possible through any other means. This final point I cannot stress enough – have a wonderful time with your new friends. The people on the course will be unlike any you have ever met before, and years after you finish your Master you will view these as golden years. Appreciate them for all they are worth. Good luck! :)


The (tentative) title of my PhD dissertation is "Uneven and Combined Cultures."

Name: David Zeglen
Education: B.F.A. in Film; M.A. In Film and Television Studies; M.Sc. in Globalization; Ph.D in Cultural Studies (ongoing)
Graduated from NTNU: 2013
Workplace: George Mason University
Position: Adjunct Instructor/Graduate Student

 I frequently advise students to be open-minded about what the program has to offer, and for students to allow themselves to be pulled in new, and unexpected directions in terms of topics, methods, and methodologies.

The (tentative) title of my PhD dissertation is "Uneven and Combined Cultures."

Name: David Zeglen
Education: B.F.A. in Film; M.A. In Film and Television Studies; M.Sc. in Globalization; Ph.D in Cultural Studies (ongoing)
Graduated from NTNU: 2013
Workplace: George Mason University
Position: Adjunct Instructor/Graduate Student

 I frequently advise students to be open-minded about what the program has to offer, and for students to allow themselves to be pulled in new, and unexpected directions in terms of topics, methods, and methodologies.

Dave ZeglenIn what way is your masters degree relevant to your PhD? Can you describe your career from a master degree to your current position as a PhD Candidate?

My masters degree at NTNU gave me a strong intellectual foundation for understanding the field of globalization. Given how relatively new the field is, there are still a lot of important research questions that need answering, so I took up some of the interests I had developed at NTNU and more deeply explored them in my PhD program. Since Cultural Studies emphasizes critical theory, I found it helpful to synthesize what I had learned at NTNU with the methodology I had developed at George Mason University. In terms of my career from finishing my masters degree to being a PhD candidate, I spent just under two years between these two points working as an adjunct professor. I wanted to first see if I enjoyed college teaching before making a bigger commitment to it. I knew from my time at NTNU that I loved doing research, but I wanted to be sure that I would be satisfied with teaching if I was going to pursue an academic career. As it turns out, I ended up loving teaching, so I decided to apply to several PhD programs with the intention of someday working as an academic at a university. 

What is the title of your PhD, and what do you write about?

The (tentative) title of my PhD dissertation is "Uneven and Combined Cultures." My dissertation identifies the conceptual weaknesses that exist in current theories of cultural globalization. My intervention is that I am exploring whether the theory of uneven and combined development - a theory that has been rapidly taken up in critical International Relations theory over the past decade - can provide a more robust theoretical explanation for cultural globalization that is also considerate of political and economic formations.

What is the ideal work for you in the future?

Ideally, I'd like to have permanent university employment that allows me to teach and do research, so I'd like to be in a tenure-track faculty position in a Cultural Studies or Global Studies department, much like the program I was in at NTNU (let me know if you're hiring!). However, tenure-track positions are becoming increasingly rare, so I'm also trying to think about other labor markets, like public foundations and think tanks, for future employment.

Your best job- and career advice to our students?

Have a general vision for your own career path, but don't feel that you have to rigidly stick to it. Your interests will evolve and change, especially as you move through the program, so allow yourself to keep several options available before definitively choosing a field or area where you will want to specialize in. One persistent problem I have come across in my graduate studies is that students oftentimes have a very rigid idea of the research they want to do, and how they want to do it, before they've even taken any classes in the program. I frequently advise students to be open-minded about what the program has to offer, and for students to allow themselves to be pulled in new, and unexpected directions in terms of topics, methods, and methodologies. You may find yourself being pulled in exciting new frontiers of research that will lead to careers that you might not have thought about before. Additionally, the larger social context in which you are situated may change, prompting you to move in a different direction than you anticipated. So be flexible, but thoughtful, about your prospects.