Feature articles

Feature articles

Photo: Researchers in NTNU NanoLab
Photo: Geir Mogen/NTNU NanoLab

Moving towards an ‘artificial pancreas’ for people with diabetes

Moving towards an ‘artificial pancreas’ for people with diabetes

Living with diabetes often means having to prick your finger to test blood glucose levels several times a day.

That’s why a group of researchers in Trondheim are working on creating an “artificial pancreas” to take over this responsibility. The work is still in its early stages, but the ultimate aim is for the device to automatically measure glucose levels, and administer insulin according to the results, doing away with regular manual testing.

Read the whole article here.


“Appealing” nanogap devices

“Appealing” nanogap devices

Photo: Sihai LouAs demand for faster and more powerful electronics grows, the size of individual components must shrink. Making these tiny components usually requires complicated techniques carried out in clean rooms with expensive equipment – but John de Mello, Bård Hoff and Sihai Luo from the Department of Chemistry at NTNU are working on a decidedly lower tech approach to making what will hopefully become high performance devices.

Read the whole article here.


Creating a miniature brain-on-a-chip

Creating a miniature brain-on-a-chip

Growing a brain in the lab might still be a far-fetched idea, but perhaps it just got one step closer.

Øyvind Halaas, a professor of medicine at NTNU, in collaboration with neuroscientists Ioanna and Axel Sandvig and others, has created a mini-“brain-on-a-chip”.

Read the whole article here.


Using the piezoelectric effect to make better implants

Using the piezoelectric effect to make better implants

Imagine a bone implant that actively stimulates the recovery of the damaged tissue slowly dissolves inside your body as it’s taken over by your own bone.

This new kind of implant is not a reality – yet. But, if Julia Glaum and her colleagues have anything to do with it, it could exist one day.

Read the whole article here.


Cracking the problem of ice build-up

Cracking the problem of ice build-up

Photo - Professor Jianying He at NTNUIf you’ve ever set foot on an icy pavement you’ll understand the importance of a good de-icer. But ice doesn’t just get in the way of people’s daily lives. Infrastructure like aircraft, transmission cables, and offshore oil platforms can all be disrupted by ice, with potentially disastrous consequences.

That’s why Jianying He, a professor of nanomechanics at NTNU, and her colleagues are coming up with new ways to crack the problem of ice build-up.

Read the whole article here.


Joined up thinking to make materials greener

Joined up thinking to make materials greener

Photo of MiMaC's Atom Probe
Photo: Geir Mogen/NTNU

A new research centre is about to give Norway a window into how its rich mineral resources can be turned into useful – and more environmentally-friendly – materials.

The Norwegian national centre for minerals and materials characterisation, known as MiMaC for short, promises to look at every step of the process of turning minerals into materials. The centre is a joint project of NTNU, the Geological Survey of Norway and research company SINTEF.

Read the whole article here.


Creating a new kind of electronics

Creating a new kind of electronics

At the border between physics and material science, Dennis Meier and his colleagues are searching for a new kind of electronics.

They hope to make circuits that are smaller, faster, and better for the environment than today’s electronics, by taking advantage of defects that already exist within materials.

Read the whole article here.