News and events at NTNU AMOS in 2018


 

Recharging the batteries under water

Technology for recharging drones under the ocean surface is ready to be tested by AMOS Scientists

Recharging the batteries under water

Technology for recharging drones under the ocean surface is ready to be tested by AMOS Scientists

One of the challenges of operating autonomous under-water vehicles over time is the vehicles’ access to fuel and energy. A newely developed system by Blue logic is set to solve this issue.

The system will be installed under the surface of the Trondheims Fjord later this year, where scientists from NTNU Amos will conduct tests and experiments, using cutting edge under water robotics and drones, before the system is fully deployed and put in use by Equinor.

 You can read more about the system here (link is to Sysla, a Norwegian newspaper).


Professor Blanke inducted into two knightly orders

During Amos day, professor Mogens Blanke of DTU was honoured with, not one, but two honorable knight appointments.

Professor Blanke inducted into two knightly orders

During Amos day, professor Mogens Blanke of DTU was honoured with, not one, but two honorable knight appointments.

Professor Blanke was inducted into the Order of the Golden Anchor, and the Order of the Godlen Feedback Loop for his outstanding contribution to the research and education in cooperation between NTNU and DTU.

Director of Amos, Grandmaster Asgeir Johan Sørensen of the Order of the Golden Anchor had this to say about professor Blanke.

– Mogens Blanke is a world-leading professor contributing with fundamental and significant knowledge and innovations within the field of fault-tolerant control. In particular, this is demonstrated on various marine applications including marine robotics, ships and ocean structures. He has also educated a remarkable high number of MSc, PhD and Postdoc.

The grand master of the Order of the Golden Feedback Loop, professor Kristin Y. Pettersen, said that induction into the order only goes to:

– Persons who have contributed significantly to the control science can be elected to honorary knights. Professor Mogens Blanke is knighted as one of the world’s most prominent contributors to marine control and fault-tolerant systems.


Intelligent robots as a tool to understand climate change in the Arctic Ocean

Mapping the Arctic Ocean

Intelligent robots as a tool to understand climate change in the Arctic Ocean

Mapping the Arctic Ocean

On September 12th 2018, R/V Kronprins Haakon left Longyearbyen on the second cruise in the research project named “the Nansen Legacy”. Its goal, to study oceanographic processes north of Svalbard, in order to understand the effects of changes in the water masses due to inflow of Atlantic water masses.

The climate is changing fast, especially in the Arctic Ocean where sea-ice extent continues to decease. Understanding the effects of the changing climate on the fragile Arctic ecosystem is of utmost importance, as changes in sea-ice cover will have direct consequences on the ecosystem.

You can read all about the expedition at NTNU TechZone.


Researchers are encouraged to a culture of sharing

Fra Longyearbyen og opp til iskanten ved 81 grader nord har deltakerne på årets Outreach-tokt hatt fokus på internasjonalt forskningssamarbeid i Arktis. Foto: Jørn Berger-Nyvoll.

Researchers are encouraged to a culture of sharing

Fra Longyearbyen og opp til iskanten ved 81 grader nord har deltakerne på årets Outreach-tokt hatt fokus på internasjonalt forskningssamarbeid i Arktis. Foto: Jørn Berger-Nyvoll.

En viktig hindring for internasjonalt forskningssamarbeid har vært personlig eierskap til forskningsdata. Både EU og Norges forskningsråd stiller nå tydelige krav til tilgjengeliggjøring av data.

Les mer på UiT, nyheter


NTNU builds small satellites to monitor the ocean

This is how scientists believe that the ocean can be monitored in the future. Different technologies can observe phenomena from different distances, with different types of sensors. Illustration: Kanna Raja, NTNU

NTNU builds small satellites to monitor the ocean

This is how scientists believe that the ocean can be monitored in the future. Different technologies can observe phenomena from different distances, with different types of sensors. Illustration: Kanna Raja, NTNU

At NTNU, small satellites are being built for maritime surveillance. Together with drones and vessels on and under water, information may be collected in a way that has never been done before. For example, poisonous algae can be discovered earlier, and farmed fish do not let go of life.

Now the combination of a variety of technologies can help us to monitor the processes in the ocean in a completely new way and to acquire new, necessary knowledge. For the first time, NTNU builds small satellites to be linked to autonomous subsea vessels (AUV), Autonomous Sea surface vessels (ASV) and unmanned airplanes (UAV).

- By combining all these technologies we can observe phenomena from different distances, with different types of sensors. This gives us a much larger range of information, "says Tor Arne Johansen and Kanna Rajan. They are both professors at the Department of Technical Cybernetics, and work at AMOS.

Read more in Geminin


NTNU AMOS with Science Advances Publication on Autonomous Surface Vehicles for Mapping of Marine Ecosystems in the Arctic during the Polar Night

Science Advances

NTNU AMOS with Science Advances Publication on Autonomous Surface Vehicles for Mapping of Marine Ecosystems in the Arctic during the Polar Night

Science Advances

NTNU AMOS in cooperation with UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, UNIS, Svalbard and international collaborators publish scientific results in Science Advances using marine robotics for mapping of marine ecosystems in the Arctic during the polar night.

Deployment of ASV from Ny-Ålsesund, Photo: Asgeir J. Sørensen

The Science Advances publication is entitled:

Use of an Autonomous Surface Vehicle reveals small-scale diel vertical migrations of zooplankton and susceptibility to light pollution under low solar irradiance

 

Abstract

Light is a major cue for nearly all life on Earth. However, most of our knowledge concerning the importance of light is based on organisms’ response to light during daytime, including the dusk and dawn phase. When it is dark, light is most often considered as pollution, with increasing appreciation of its negative ecological effects. Using an Autonomous Surface Vehicle fitted with a hyperspectral irradiance sensor and an acoustic profiler, we detected and quantified the behavior of zooplankton in an unpolluted light environment in the high Arctic polar night and compared the results with that from a light-polluted environment close to our research vessels. First, in environments free of light pollution, the zooplankton community is intimately connected to the ambient light regime and performs synchronized diel vertical migrations in the upper 30 m despite the sun never rising above the horizon. Second, the vast majority of the pelagic community exhibits a strong light-escape response in the presence of artificial light, observed down to 100 m. We conclude that artificial light from traditional sampling platforms affects the zooplankton community to a degree where it is impossible to examine its abundance and natural rhythms within the upper 100 m. This study underscores the need to adjust sampling platforms, particularly in dim-light conditions, to capture relevant physical and biological data for ecological studies. It also highlights a previously unchartered susceptibility to light pollution in a region destined to see significant changes in light climate due to a reduced ice cover and an increased anthropogenic activity.

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/1/eaap9887

 

More information may be found here:

https://uit.no/om/enhet/aktuelt/nyhet?p_document_id=557050&p_dimension_id=88163

https://gemini.no/2018/01/havets-hemmeligheter-hentes-dypet/


Odd Magnus Faltinsen receives CEMT Award for Outstanding Contribution to the European Maritime Industry 2017

Odd Magnus Faltinsen

Odd Magnus Faltinsen receives CEMT Award for Outstanding Contribution to the European Maritime Industry 2017

Odd Magnus Faltinsen

Odd Magnus Faltinsen receives the 2017 CEMT Award, in recognition of distinguished career in naval architecture and ocean engineering for nearly 50 years, and of exceptional contribution in the field of hydrodynamics.

The CEMT Award is presented annually by the Council of the Confederation of European Maritime Technology Societies (CEMT) in recognition of the outstanding contribution made to the success of the global maritime industry by an individual, company or organisation based in Europe. Such a contribution may be technological, political or economic, and may have been achieved by a personal contribution over a period of time, or by the recent introduction of a product or service.


The album "Movements" of BIIAS released on March 4 on Spotify and iTunes

The album "Movements" of BIIAS released on March 4 on Spotify and iTunes

The album "Movements" of BIIAS released on March 4 on Spotify and iTunes

The album "Movements" of BIIAS released on March 4 on Spotify and iTunes

AMOS have through the last three years been using the artist BIIAS from Trondheim to provide music for the Polar night exhibition that is currently shown at Vitenskapsmuseet NTNU (open all days during the week). At the exhibition, BIIAS provided ambient soundscapes to illustrate marine life at the surface (seabirds and deep water fishes coming up to feed), high zooplankton activity and diurnal migration triggered by the extremely low light condition provided by diffuse light from the sun that is below the horizon, northern light and the moon. In addition, the exhibition with corresponding soundscapes shows the mass occurrence of organisms at the seafloor were reproduction is one of the major features.

Based on the soundscapes from “Polar night”, the year 2017 has been used to take these soundscapes to the next level, which now comprises 10 new songs. It is our hope that the original soundtrack ”Movements (Original Music for the “Polar Night” Exhibitions) created by BIIAS in collaboration with NTNU AMOS, will provide a platform for art in science. With its vibrant soundscapes and existential lyrics, the intention of “Movements” is to transport the listener into the polar night and complement science with artistic integrity to ease the communication of scientific research. It was published on March the 4th 2018 on all major music streaming services (eg. Spotify and ITunes).

By combining art and science, this project will work as a platform to pique people’s curiosity of the possibilities using enabling technology to generate new knowledge of the seascape and the matrix of organisms living in sea water, thus providing more answers to questions regarding life on Earth.

Of the 10 songs there are 5 instrumental soundscapes and 5 lyrical compositions all exploring peoples relationship with the sea, the depths, underwater robotics and marine biology. NTNU AMOS is planning to use the music in educational videos, TV productions, exhibitions and book projects. The AMOS professors with colleagues from Uit-The Arctic University of Norway and University of Delaware (USA) have signed a contract with Springer Verlag regarding a book about "Polar Night" and where the album "Movements" will give readers a new dimension by using this music while reading the book about enabling technology and the organisms living in the “dark ocean matrix”. The work was financed through NTNU Centre of Excellence ”Autonomous Marine Operations and Systems” (AMOS, NRC project 223254).


Acquisition of AutoNaut USV

AutoNaut, acceptance test in Trondheimsfjorden. Foto: Artur Zolich

Acquisition of AutoNaut USV

AutoNaut, acceptance test in Trondheimsfjorden. Foto: Artur Zolich


NTNU has recently acquired a 5-meter long green energy (wave powered) boat, AutoNaut, for ocean research using autonomous vessels. After a test trip in Trondheimsfjorden, the vessel is now ready to be equipped with the AMOS and AUR-Lab research group's own equipment. This will embed advanced command and control functions developed jointly with the LSTS lab at the University of Porto, and enable it to operate in oceanographic mission in a team of autonomous robotics agents including unmanned aerial vehicels, unmanned underwater vehicles, small satellites, and other unmanned surface vessels.

Project managers are Kanna Rajan and Tor Arne Johansen at the Department of Engineering Cybernetics.

AutoNaut in Trondheimsfjorden. Foto: Artur Zolich

AutoNaut in the lab. Foto: Artur Zolich


Walter Caharija received SINTEF's award for outstanding research

CEO Alexandra Bech Gjørv congratulates award winner Walter Caharija from SINTEF Ocean. (Photo: SINTEF)

Walter Caharija received SINTEF's award for outstanding research

CEO Alexandra Bech Gjørv congratulates award winner Walter Caharija from SINTEF Ocean. (Photo: SINTEF)

The researcher received the award for a much quoted scientific article. There, Walter Caharija describes research he has done - through his PhD study at NTNU - on a control system for autonomous ships. The system is designed to keep a predetermined course under the influence of waves, currents and wind.

The winning article, which Caharija is main author to, describe all "of evidence", from the mathematical calculations to full scale tests.

Coauthors professor Kristin Y. Pettersen (which was Caharijas main supervisors under PhD work), , Professor Asgeir J. Sorensen and Professor Jan T. Gravdahl NTNU (which was Caharijas co-supervisors under PhD work), Milan Milovanovic from Framo (which was Caharijas peer under PhD study NTNU) and Marco Bibuli, Enrica Zereik and Gabriele Bruzzone from CNR-ISSI (Italy), Pedro Calado from Metric4 (Portugal) and Jose Braga from OceaScan (Portugal).

Caharija took his PhD in Engineering Cybernetics at NTNU AMOS - Center for Autonomous Marine Operations and Systems.

See also SINTEF.no (in Norwegian)


Kristin Y. Pettersen has become member of the IFAC Council

Kristin Y. Pettersen

Kristin Y. Pettersen has become member of the IFAC Council

Kristin Y. Pettersen

Seminars at NTNU AMOS

 

Guest lecture by Ralf Bachmayer: Motivation, Development and Demonstration of an unmanned iceberg observation and mapping capability using Autonomous Surface and Underwater Vehicles

22 November 2018 at 09:15-10:00
B343 Elektro-B, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Ralf Bachmayer: Motivation, Development and Demonstration of an unmanned iceberg observation and mapping capability using Autonomous Surface and Underwater Vehicles

22 November 2018 at 09:15-10:00
B343 Elektro-B, Gløshaugen

Motivation, Development and Demonstration of an unmanned iceberg observation and mapping capability using Autonomous Surface and Underwater Vehicles

Prof. Dr. Ralf Bachmayer, e-mail: rbachmayer@marum.de 

Abstract:

Besides their apparent beauty and majestic appearance and economic impact on seasonal tourism along the iceberg alley, icebergs represent a significant threat to marine transportation and off-shore operations. Fundamental to the industries iceberg management plan is an escalating iceberg detection-observation-intervention and possible asset relocation plan. In this presentation I will present our approach to provide operators with better and more detailed information about icebergs and their meteorological and oceanographic environment. I will present the development and deployment of an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) SeaDragon. The second part of the overall observation system is a modified Slocum type underwater glider. The co-registered data collected from both platforms, from above and below water will be presented. Both vehicles navigate autonomously around icebergs to collect shape and met-ocean data. To conclude I will show an overview of a new platform under testing, the unmanned submersible surface craft (USSC) SeaDuck. The new vehicle concept is a direct outcome of the operational experience and client input from the operation of USV SeaDragon and the hybrid underwater glider.


Guest lecture by Haiyang Chao: Estimation of Angles of Attack and Sideslip with/without Direct Flow Angle Measurements

19 November 2018 at 10:15-11:00
B343 Elektro-B, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Haiyang Chao: Estimation of Angles of Attack and Sideslip with/without Direct Flow Angle Measurements

19 November 2018 at 10:15-11:00
B343 Elektro-B, Gløshaugen

Haiyang Chao, University of Kansas

Angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) describe the interaction between flight vehicles and the surrounding air, which have significant influences on aircraft aerodynamics. This talk focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of four filters for the estimation of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Specifically, two novel filters (a complementary filter and an extended Kalman filter) are proposed and evaluated without using direct flow angle and GPS measurements; two existing AOA/AOS filters are also implemented and evaluated. All filters are designed with minimal inputs and states to ensure the ease of implementation, simplicity of tuning, and computation efficiency. Both simulation and UAV flight test results show the performance of the proposed filters. Especially, flight test results from two different UAVs (a T-tail UAV and a flying wing UAV) show that the root mean square errors of estimated inertial AOA and AOS are less than 1.5 degrees under nominal flight conditions and around 2 degrees under aggressive maneuvers compared with direct flow angle measurements.


Guest lecture by Professor Michael Triantafyllou on “MORPHING FINS AND SHAPE-CHANGING BODIES IMPROVE UNDERWATER PROPULSION AND MANEUVERING”

Tuesday 6 November 2018 at 10:00 - 11:15
Auditorium A1, Havrommet, 3rd floor, Sintef Ocean

Guest lecture by Professor Michael Triantafyllou on “MORPHING FINS AND SHAPE-CHANGING BODIES IMPROVE UNDERWATER PROPULSION AND MANEUVERING”

Tuesday 6 November 2018 at 10:00 - 11:15
Auditorium A1, Havrommet, 3rd floor, Sintef Ocean

See PDF for content regarding the lecture.

Short biography

Professor Michael Triantafyllou is the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Professor in Ocean Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Director of the MIT Sea Grant Program. He teaches and has published extensively journal articles and refereed conference papers in the areas of biomimetics, dynamics and control of marine systems, and experimental fluid mechanics. He pioneered the development of science-driven biomimetic robots to study the basic mechanisms of flow control that lead to the outstanding agility of fish and cetaceans. He is currently studying the physics of flow sensing in fish and marine mammals to achieve super-maneuverability in ocean vehicles through flow feedback control.

Professor Michael Triantafyllou is a precious scientific advisor of NTNU AMOS on bio-inspired research and will be at the Department of Marine Technology from 6th to 9th November, room C2.072.


Guest lecture on SLAM for UAV navigation by Jon Kim, ANU

24 October 2018 at 10:15-11:00
B-343 Elektro-B

 

Guest lecture on SLAM for UAV navigation by Jon Kim, ANU

24 October 2018 at 10:15-11:00
B-343 Elektro-B

 

Seminar Title: SLAM for UAV navigation: Concept, Progress and Challenges

Speaker: Dr Jonghyuk Kim (The Australian National University)

Abstract:

Autonomous robotics technology has the significant economic potential to industry ranging from automated mine to environmental monitoring in cluttered environments.  This talk will share some lessons learnt from several industrial projects with BAE Systems on multiple UAV and Australian DSTO on land vehicles. The presentation will provide recent results on the tightly-integrated aerial SLAM (simultaneous localisation and localisation) and the dual-quaternion parameterization to solve the graph-SLAM problem. It will then discuss potential collaboration areas with NTNU/AMOS such as applying the Nonlinear Observer theory to enhance the performance of the SLAM system, as well as the recent project on Antarctic under-ice mapping. 

Bio:
Dr. Jon Kim is a senior lecturer at the Australian National University in Canberra. His research interests are in estimation & control, and optimization with applications in the aerospace, mining and forestry industries. He has obtained his PhD in Field Robotics at the University of Sydney in 2004, pioneering the area of airborne SLAM and is the recipient of the prestigious Charles Sharpe Beecher Award from IMechE/UK 2005. He has been Co-chair of ACRA (Australasian Conference in Robotics and Automation) 2015 and 2008 and Associate Editor of ICRA and IROS in 2017, 2010 and 2008.


Maritimt Forum Midt-Norge inviterer til møte

«Hvis man ikke kjenner fortiden, forstår man ikke nåtiden og egner seg ikke til å forme fremtiden.» Med dette som bakteppe vil gründere og industriledere reflektere over de valg som ble...

Maritimt Forum Midt-Norge inviterer til møte

«Hvis man ikke kjenner fortiden, forstår man ikke nåtiden og egner seg ikke til å forme fremtiden.»

Med dette som bakteppe vil gründere og industriledere reflektere over de valg som ble gjort og om oppturer og nedturer. Ikke minst får vi høre deres tanker om videre vekst og utvikling.

Under er programmet:

Golar-Nor Offshore: Historien om Petrojarl I

Som den første «harsh environment» FPSO-en i verden, var produksjonsskipet Petrojarl I både banebrytende og «disruptiv» da den stod ferdig i 1986. Golar-Nor Offshores første administrerende direktør Kaare Gisvold var en av hovedmennene bak konseptet og forteller om erfaringene fra denne tiden.

Seatex: Verdensledende maritim instrumentering

Det trønderske selskapet Seatex ble etablert i 1984, og er fremdeles, nå som Kongsberg Seatex, en av de ledende aktørene innenfor instrumenterings- og posisjoneringsløsninger til maritime markeder som bl.a. olje- og gassmarkedet offshore. Gründerne Bjørn A. Fossum og Hans O Torsen forteller om utgangspunktet og tidlig vekst for et suksessfullt selskap.

Marine Cybernetics: Testpionerene fra NTNU

Etablert i 2002 av fire professorer fra NTNU, ble selskapet det første i verden som leverte Hardware-in-the-loop-testing av avanserte styringssystem for offshore og maritime fartøy. Professor, gründer og tidligere adm. direktør Asgeir Sørensen forteller om oppbyggingen av selskapet sammen med Stein Eggan, som tok over stafettpinnen etter de første oppbyggingsårene.

Eelume: Vaktmester under vann

Er det mulig å utfordre verdens ledende ROV aktører med ny teknologi? Eelume er et start-up selskap fra NTNU Technology Transfer AS som leverer en svømmende slange designet for subsea inspeksjon og vedlikehold. CEO Arne Kjørsvik tar oss gjennom bakgrunnen og hvordan selskapet skal klare å skalere opp virksomheten.

Avsluttende debatt


Guest lecture by Professor Murat Arcak, U.C. Berkeley

Monday 28 May at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-14:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld., Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Professor Murat Arcak, U.C. Berkeley

Monday 28 May at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-14:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld., Gløshaugen

Networks of Dissipative Systems: Compositional Certification of Stability, Performance, and Safety

Abstract:

Standard computational tools for control synthesis and verification do not scale well to large-scale, networked systems in emerging applications.  These lectures present a compositional methodology suitable when the subsystems are amenable to analytical and computational methods but the interconnection, taken as a whole, is beyond the reach of these methods. The main idea is to break up the task of certifying stability, performance, or safety for the network into subproblems of manageable size using dissipativity properties of the subsystems. Along the way we will introduce the notions of equilibrium-independent dissipativity as well as dissipativity with dynamic supply rates, and point to computational tools for verifying these properties.  We will illustrate the compositional approach with case studies in multi-agent systems and biological networks.

Short bio:

Murat Arcak is a professor at U.C. Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department.  He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey (1996) and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1997 and 2000). He received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2003, the Donald P. Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in 2006, the Control and Systems Theory Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2007, and the Antonio Ruberti Young Researcher Prize from the IEEE Control Systems Society in 2014. He is a member of SIAM and a fellow of IEEE.