News and events at NTNU AMOS in 2017

Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen is this year's best lecturerer at IMT

Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen is this year's best lecturerer at IMT

Read the commentary by the students: "Årets foreleser" (11 May 2017)

NTNU AMOS is collaborating with Kjell Inge Røkke's team and WWF in the development of the Research Expedition Vessel (REV)

NTNU AMOS is collaborating with Kjell Inge Røkke's team and WWF in the development of the Research Expedition Vessel (REV)

Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen says the following about the project:

"REV is trailblazing in the way it targets high impact solutions caring for the oceans. This is of upmost importance for humanity. Still there is a huge lack of understandings of the processes taking place in the oceans and the coastal areas including the arctic areas. We are in hurry to understand, and actions are needed right now. Our mission is to contribute to knowledge-based management and sustainability in the value creation harvest of the resources the oceans are offering us. We trust in knowledge and competence, and a corresponding holistic view when addressing global challenges related to the oceans such as climate, environment, lack of food, energy and minerals as well as logistics and transportation. Turning the challenges into new possibilities and solutions require multi-disciplinary teams with highly skilled, competent and even more important, visionary and wise people with passion and capabilities to execute.”

Find more info on REV's website

Teknisk Ukeblad wrote a feature on the project, intervieweing among others NTNU AMOS director Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen: "REV-designer om Røkke: – Han har øyne for detaljer. Det har vært inspirerende, men også utfordrende" (2 May 2017)

 


The Dynamic Position Lab – demonstrating the theory behind automatic positioning at sea

screenshot

The Dynamic Position Lab – demonstrating the theory behind automatic positioning at sea

– Blog by Prof. Roger Skjetne
screenshot
Read Profeesor Skjetne's blog on NTNU TechZone: "The Dynamic Position Lab – demonstrating the theory behind automatic positioning at sea" (31 March 2017)

NTNU AMOS PhD graduate becomes adjunct professor in Brazil

Daniel

NTNU AMOS PhD graduate becomes adjunct professor in Brazil

Daniel

NTNU AMOS PhD graduate Daniel de Almeida Fernandes has accepted a position as an assistant professor at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) in Brazil.


Teknisk Ukeblad wrote a profile on NTNU AMOS Prof. Kristin Y. Pettersen

Article TUArticle TU

Teknisk Ukeblad wrote a profile on NTNU AMOS Prof. Kristin Y. Pettersen

Article TUArticle TU

Read the profile in Teknisk Ukeblad: "Forsker Kristin Y. Pettersen utvikler slangeroboter, men foretrekker blyant" (22 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS spin-off company Ecotone invents miracle camera

NTNU AMOS spin-off company Ecotone invents miracle camera

Read more on Finansavisen: "Jakter 20 millioner til nytt NTNU-vidunder" (8 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS spin-off company BluEye starts production of underwater drones for private use

NTNU AMOS spin-off company BluEye starts production of underwater drones for private use

Media coverage:


Øivind Kåre Kjerstad interviewed about his Arctic maritime research

Photo: SAMCoT

Øivind Kåre Kjerstad interviewed about his Arctic maritime research

Photo: SAMCoT
Read the article on Gemini.no: "Lager systemer som forstår Arktis" (1 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS has received funding for new projects

One of the new projects is called "Nonlinear Autopilot Design for Extended Flight Envelopes and Operation of Fixed-Wing UAVs in Extreme Conditions" Project manager: Prof. Thor I. Fossen ...

NTNU AMOS has received funding for new projects

One of the new projects is called "Nonlinear Autopilot Design for Extended Flight Envelopes and Operation of Fixed-Wing UAVs in Extreme Conditions"
Project manager: Prof. Thor I. Fossen
2 PhD candidates and 1 postdoc
Find more info on RCN's website: "IKTPLUSS bevilger midler til FRINATEK-prosjekter" (21 January 2017)

The other new project is called "AILARON Autonomous Imaging and Learning Ai RObot identifying plaNkton taxa in-situ"
Project manager: Ass. Prof. Annette Stahl
1 PhD candidate and 1 postdoc

 


New article by NTNU AMOS personnel and colleagues in Nature's "Scientific Reports"

Read the article in Nature's "Science Reports": " Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice " (2 November 2016)

New article by NTNU AMOS personnel and colleagues in Nature's "Scientific Reports"

Read the article in Nature's "Science Reports": "Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice" (2 November 2016)

NTNU AMOS researchers write about their findings on their field trip

Periphylla

NTNU AMOS researchers write about their findings on their field trip

Periphylla

Professors Geir Johnsen and Jørgen Berge share with us their findings from the yearly field trip with the UNIS course in underwater robotics in the polar night.

Find their findings in the media features below.

Media coverage:


Prof. Geir Johnsen featured in new NTNU movie

Prof. Geir Johnsen featured in new NTNU movie

NTNU published a new movie on January 2016 about its motto: "Knowledge for a better world".

Seminars at NTNU AMOS in 2017

Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, U.C. Berkeley, on "Scalable Reachability Computations for Nonlinear Systems using Contraction Theory"

23 May 2017 at 14:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, U.C. Berkeley, on "Scalable Reachability Computations for Nonlinear Systems using Contraction Theory"

23 May 2017 at 14:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Reachability analysis is critical for obtaining formal safety and performance guarantees for nonlinear and hybrid dynamical systems. However existing computational tools do not scale to models with more than a few state variables. In this talk we present a scalable procedure to compute tight over-approximations of reachable sets.  We first sample a number of trajectories of the system and next establish a tight bound on the divergence between the samples and neighboring trajectories using the concept of matrix measures from contraction theory. The divergence bounds also account for the accumulation of numerical simulation errors along simulation traces, which means that the proposed method provides a guaranteed over-approximation of the reachable set.  We demonstrate that the proposed technique scales well to systems with a large number of states.

Biography

Murat Arcak is a professor at U.C. Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department.  He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey (1996) and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1997 and 2000). His research is in dynamical systems and control theory with applications to synthetic biology, multi-agent systems, and transportation. Prior to joining Berkeley in 2008, he was a faculty member at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2003, the Donald P. Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in 2006, the Control and Systems Theory Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2007, and the Antonio Ruberti Young Researcher Prize from the IEEE Control Systems Society in 2014. He is a member of SIAM and a fellow of IEEE.


NTNU Ocean Week 2017: Unraveling the unmanned

3-5 May 2017
Radisson Blu Royal Garden, Trondheim

NTNU Ocean Week 2017: Unraveling the unmanned

3-5 May 2017
Radisson Blu Royal Garden, Trondheim

Guest lecture series by Antonio Loria on on stability and stabilization of nonlinear time-varying systems, including cascaded systems theory

3 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
4 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
5 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
6 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
7 April at 09:15-11:00 and 13:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture series by Antonio Loria on on stability and stabilization of nonlinear time-varying systems, including cascaded systems theory

3 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
4 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
5 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
6 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
7 April at 09:15-11:00 and 13:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

The lectures are part of the PhD-course TK8103 Advanced Nonlinear Control at NTNU, but anyone else who is interested is welcome to attend the lectures. 

Guest lecture by Dr Erlend Kristiansen, COMSOL Multiphysics, on how commercial finite-element software such as COMSOL Multiphysics is used in practice

28 March 2017 at 10:15-12:00 
Room KJL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Erlend Kristiansen, COMSOL Multiphysics, on how commercial finite-element software such as COMSOL Multiphysics is used in practice

28 March 2017 at 10:15-12:00 
Room KJL5, Gløshaugen

Abstract:

The main topic of Erlend's presentation will be about how commercial finite-element software such as COMSOL Multiphysics is used in practice. He will introduce the finite-element method and some aspect about the implementation in COMSOL. Moreover, he will demonstrate COMSOL Multiphysics on some demo models. 

Short bio:

During Erlend's PhD studies, he worked on mathematical modelling of hydrodynamic memory-effects in marine cybernetics.

Afterwards, he worked at Fedem Technology AS, Sintef Fisheries and Aquaculture and Atmel Norway with mathematical modelling and developing of simulation software.

Since 2012, he has been working at COMSOL Multiphysics. 


Guest lecture by Prof. Jay Farrell, University of California, Riverside, USA, on "Reliable Precise State Estimation for Autonomous Highway Vehicles"

24 March 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Jay Farrell, University of California, Riverside, USA, on "Reliable Precise State Estimation for Autonomous Highway Vehicles"

24 March 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Autonomous and wirelessly connected vehicles face various challenges before effective commercial deployment. Key among these challenges is accurate and reliable awareness of world interactions. Awareness arises from onboard sensors and from ubiquitous communication between vehicles and infrastructure. Vehicle coordination and safety specifications necessitate reliable “where-in-lane” (i.e., decimeter accuracy) knowledge of vehicle position relative to other vehicles and the environment. This presentation will address vehicle state estimation with a focus on high precision and reliability.

Sensor fusion is critical to achieving these application requirements. Several of the sensors (e.g., vision, radar, Lidar, ultrasound, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)) have various spurious measurement types. Standard Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) approaches are not sufficiently reliable at removing the effects of such spurious measurements because the EKF approach must decide at the time each measurement arrives whether it is valid. If deemed as valid, the measurement is used and discarded; otherwise it is not used and discarded. When that decision is wrong, either measurement information is lost or the state and covariance estimates are corrupted. Either situation can result in divergence of the EKF.

An alternative is to maintain all recent measurement data within a moving time-horizon. This window of data can be processed within a Bayesian framework to extract the optimal state trajectory estimate over the time-horizon. Because the time window of data is maintained it is straightforward to change the assumptions as to which data are valid and reprocess the data, allowing consideration of multiple fault scenario assumptions. Therefore, this approach is referred to as a Contemplative Real-Time (CRT) estimator. It is closely related to Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). This presentation will review the interrelationships between the EKF, Iterated Extended Kalman Filter (IEKF), and CRT within the Bayesian framework; discuss fault accommodation; present comparative experimental results; and discuss recent results on computationally efficient carrier phase integer ambiguity resolution over time windows.

Short bio

Jay A. Farrell is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Riverside. He earned B.S. degrees in physics and electrical engineering from Iowa State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Notre Dame. At Charles Stark Draper Lab (1989-1994), he received the Engineering Vice President's Best Technical Publication Award in 1990, and Recognition Awards for Outstanding Performance and Achievement in 1991 and 1993. He has served the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) as Finance Chair for three IEEE CDC`s (`95, `01, and `03), on the Board of Governors for two terms (`03-`06, `12-`14), as Vice President Finance and Vice President of Technical Activities,  as General Chair of IEEE CDC 2012, and as President in 2014. He was named a GNSS Leader to Watch for 2009-2010 by GPS World Magazine in May 2009 and a winner of the Connected Vehicle Technology Challenge by the U.S. Department of Transportation`s (DOT`s) Research and Innovative Technology Administration in July 2011. He is author of over 250 technical publications, and three books, a Distinguished Member of IEEE CSS, a Fellow of AAAS, and a Fellow of the IEEE.


PhD course on Intrapreneurship and Business Model Canvas

7 March 2017 at 12-16:00
Clarion Hotel and Congress, Brattørkaia 1, Trondheim

PhD course on Intrapreneurship and Business Model Canvas

7 March 2017 at 12-16:00
Clarion Hotel and Congress, Brattørkaia 1, Trondheim

Innovation Lunch "Behind the scenes of MemfoACT AS"

22 February 2017 at 11:30-12:30
NTNU Gløshaugen

Innovation Lunch "Behind the scenes of MemfoACT AS"

22 February 2017 at 11:30-12:30
NTNU Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Ali Khalighi, École Centrale Marseille, France, on “Attaining Unprecedentedly High Data-Rates in Underwater Environments by Visible Light Communications"

17 February 2017 12:00-12:40
Bestikken, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Dr Ali Khalighi, École Centrale Marseille, France, on “Attaining Unprecedentedly High Data-Rates in Underwater Environments by Visible Light Communications"

17 February 2017 12:00-12:40
Bestikken, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract:

Today we are witnessing a growing need to high-rate data transmission in underwater missions in a wide range of application areas. In particular, with the increasing use of robotics in underwater missions and the recent advances in the design and development of AUVs, there is an urgent need for broadband underwater links.  Recently, visible light communications have received particular attention due to their potential in providing very high-rate data transmission. In the challenging underwater context, the major impairments of the communication link include high beam attenuation, especially in high turbidity waters, and link misalignments. We provide an overview on VLC systems in underwater environments and explain the main considerations on the impact of the underwater channel and the transmission schemes. We present the current research activities in Fresnel Institute and also some future research directions for improving the performance and reliability of these links.

Short biography:

Dr. Ali Khalighi is an Associate Professor in École Centrale Marseille and head of “Telecommunications and Antenna Processing” in Fresnel Institute research lab. His main research areas of interest include signal processing for wireless communication systems with an emphasis on the physical layer aspects of free-space, underwater, and indoor visible-light optical communications. So far he has served as the Technical Program Committee member for more than 20 international conferences and workshops in the communications area. Also, he was the Vice Chair of WG2 of the FP7 IC1101 COST Action on optical wireless communications. Dr. Khalighi is the recipient of the Scientific Excellence Award from the French Ministry of Research and Higher Education for the period of 2009–2017.


Guest lecture by Prof. Bernard Molin, École Centrale de Marseille, France, on “Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with multiple vertical cylinders”

11 January 2017 14:00-14:45
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Bernard Molin, École Centrale de Marseille, France, on “Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with multiple vertical cylinders”

11 January 2017 14:00-14:45
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

Sloshing tests are performed on a rectangular tank filled with bottom-mounted vertical cylinders, around the natural frequency of the first sloshing mode. The numbers and heights of the cylinders are varied. From the position of the resonance peak an experimental dispersion equation is derived, and compared with different formulations from literature. A new formulation is proposed. A modal approach is then applied to derive the RAO of the sloshing response, and compared with the experimental results.

Short bio

Professor Bernard Molin has for the last years been a professor at École Centrale de Marseille. His research activities have been mainly concerned with nonlinear hydrodynamics (drift forces, slow drift motion, high frequency loads and response), and development of computer models for the French offshore industry. Recent involvement has included hydrodynamics of perforated structures, Vortex Induced Vibrations, slamming, moon-pool resonances, hydroelastic responses, sloshing in tanks and motion coupling, run-up effects and slow-drift excitation.


Guest lecture by Prof. Antonios Tsourdos, Cranfield University, on "Multiple Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Architectures, Algorithms and Applications"

20 January 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Antonios Tsourdos, Cranfield University, on "Multiple Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Architectures, Algorithms and Applications"

20 January 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract: 

Multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (MUAVs) can provide significant reductions in manpower and risk to humans for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), including: enhancement of ISR coverage; increase in the mission success rate; increase of autonomy; robustness and benign degradation in performance. Using a swarm of UAVs has been receiving attention for a variety of applications to take advantage of its inherent flexibility and versatility. The focus of this talk is airborne monitoring of ground traffic behaviour by multiple UAVs in order to detect disguised threats and then to notify the human commander about the potentially dangerous vehicles. Within this traffic the most difficult challenge is to recognise behaviours of the potentially dangerous vehicles, disguised as legitimate traffic. Most of these activities of the dangerous vehicles are characterised by occasional deviations from motion characteristics of the legitimate traffic. For such ISR mission to be successful, the overall autonomy should be able to provide continuity of tracking of the vehicles of interest and thus enable positive identification of suspects. 

Biographical Note:

Antonios Tsourdos is a Professor of Autonomous Systems and Control Engineering and Director of Research – Aerospace, Transport and Manufacturing at Cranfield University. Professor Tsourdos received his PhD degree on nonlinear flight control by the Cranfield University in 1999. Professor Tsourdos was member of the Team Stellar, the winning team for the UK MoD Grand Challenge (2008) and the IET Innovation Award (Category Team, 2009). Professor Tsourdos is an editorial board member of the Proceedings of the  IMechE Part G Journal of Aerospace Engineering, the International Journal of Systems Science, the IEEE Transactions of Aerospace and Electronic Systems and the Aerospace Science & Technology. Professor Tsourdos is a vice-chair of the IFAC Technical Committees on Aerospace Control, and member of the IFAC Technical Committes on Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles, on Networked Systems and on Discrete Event and Hybrid Systems, the AIAA Technical Committee on Guidance, Control & Navigation (AIAA GNC TC) and the IEEE Control System Society Technical Committee on Aerospace Control (TCAC). Professor Tsourdos is also member of IET Robotics & Mechatronics Executive Team. Professor Tsourdos’s research interests include guidance and control of single and multiple vehicles, network decision systems, cyber-physical systems, multiple vehicle reasoning and integrated vehicle health management. He has published more than 200 papers and three books.

Prof. Antonios Tsourdos' homepage


Guest lecture by Associate Prof. Gustaf Hendeby, Linköping University, on "Animals Target Tracking Inspired by Biologists"

20 January 2017 at 9:15-10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Associate Prof. Gustaf Hendeby, Linköping University, on "Animals Target Tracking Inspired by Biologists"

20 January 2017 at 9:15-10:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract:

In this presentation I will discuss target tracking problems that we have encountered while collaborating with biologists. The purpose has been to simplify the biologists everyday work, by automating otherwise time consuming manual labor.  Target tracking is generally considered a mature research field; with well established statistical methods that can be used more or less out of the box.  However, the majority of the available literature deals with surveillance scenarios where vehicles or aircraft are tracked.  Tracking of animals and other natural phenomena, which often is the objective for biologists, is less well covered in the standard tracking literature and result in new challenges.  Examples will be presented of how to extended standard methods to better handle the encountered problem formulations; eg, by introducing a new constrained motion model to be able to follow dolphins in a partially occluded basin, or extracting visual queues to detect the take-off time and direction of migrating birds in Emlen funnels.  Though going slightly outside the standard methods, these tricks fit nicely into the general tracking framework.

Biosketch:

Gustaf Hendeby is Associate Professor and Docent in Automatic Control, in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Linköping University.  He received his MSc in Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering in 2002 and his PhD in Automatic Control in 2008, both from Linköping University.  He worked as Senior Researcher at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) 2009-2011, and Senior Scientist at Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) and held an adjunct Associate Professor position at Linköping University 2011-2015. Dr. Hendeby's main research interests are stochastic signal processing and sensor fusion with applications to nonlinear problems, target tracking, and simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM).  He has experience of both theoretical analysis as well as implementation aspects.

Gustaf Hendeby's homepage