News and events at NTNU AMOS in 2019


 

Enhancing education and Science cooperation

NTNU AMOS enters into a collaboration agreement with Arctic Research Centre, Institute for Bioscience - Aarhus University.

Enhancing education and Science cooperation

NTNU AMOS enters into a collaboration agreement with Arctic Research Centre, Institute for Bioscience - Aarhus University.

One of the most significant global issues over the past 20 years has been the vast change in the Arctic region. The world has again turned its attention to the Arctic, this time mainly because of climate change and its expected global impacts, the economic potential of the region, and the geopolitical implications of changes. Political, economic and social developments are already underway, including the flourishing of advanced democratic societies.

Undoubtedly the future of the Arctic will be radically different from the reality we know today. To meet these challenges, there is an urgent need to prepare the Arctic societies through improved knowledge and education of future generations. This is best done through partnerships among institutions in the Arctic.

By this collaborative agreement the NTNU AMOS and the Arctic Research Centre, Institute for Bioscience - Aarhus University have decided to further strengthen collaboration on education and research.

The collaboration agreement aims to create the basis for highly integrated and coordinated research and education collaboration focused around marine and arctic science and technology, logistical cooperation and strong international coordination of policy and governance related needs.

 

Contact person

Professor Søren Rysgaard


NTNU researchers has found a solution to landing fixed-wing drones on ships

Stormy seas with ship

NTNU researchers has found a solution to landing fixed-wing drones on ships

Stormy seas with ship

There are several solutions for capturing fixed-wing drones from ships, but researchers at the Department of Engineering Cybernetics at NTNU and AMOS believe their method is better. It consists of two autonomous multikoptere with a line between them taking off from the ship, and receives position and planned path to fixed wing drone. By stretching the rope between them on the same course as the drone, and a little lower, established a blocking line.

Read more in Gemini (in Norwegian)


NTNU researchers get the front cover of Science Robotics February issue!

Light autonomous underwater vehicle (LAUV). CREDIT: GUNHILD ELISABETH BERGET/NORWEGIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

NTNU researchers get the front cover of Science Robotics February issue!

Light autonomous underwater vehicle (LAUV). CREDIT: GUNHILD ELISABETH BERGET/NORWEGIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Modern robotic technology presents new ways to map the oceans and gather data in a far more efficient and cost-effective way, then previously possible.

The autonomous underwater vehicles are able to cover a larger area than ships and stationary sensors. They are also able to make their own decisions on where to move in order to get the best possible samples.

These new methods are important if we are to gain a better understanding of the complex ecosystems of the oceans. More knowledge will hopefully help us make the best decisions on how to maintain and preserve the health of the oceans and their vital ecosystems.  

The research team conducted their experiments in the coastal waters near Runde Island, Norway. This area is affected by strong winds, ocean currents, and freshwater runoff from land. Fossum et al. used a light autonomous underwater vehicle (LAUV) to survey the edges of predefined volumes, and the resulting data allowed the robot to identify interior areas with high concentrations of subsurface chlorophyll a for additional, detailed sampling.

LAUV results were confirmed with data from remote sensing and shipboard samples. The combination of real-time data analysis and accurate, adaptive robotic sampling will help improve our understanding of marine food webs and their dynamic, heterogeneous environments.

Read the article in Science Robotic


MarineUAS - an EU-funded doctoral program to strengthen research training on Autonomous UAS for Marine and Coastal Monitoring

MarineUAS

MarineUAS - an EU-funded doctoral program to strengthen research training on Autonomous UAS for Marine and Coastal Monitoring

MarineUAS

MarineUAS is an EU-funded doctoral program to strategically strengthen research training on Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Systems for Marine and Coastal Monitoring. It is a comprehensive researcher training program across a range of partners in several countries designed to have high impact on the training of individual researchers and their knowledge, skills and their future careers. MarineUAS has established a unique cooperative environment. It takes benefit of the partners' extensive and complementary knowledge, field operational experience, and experimental facilities.

Marine UAS will build a solid foundation for long-term European excellence and innovation in this field by sharing research infrastructures for field testing and disseminating the research and training outcomes and best practice of MarineUAS into the doctoral schools of the partners, as well as by fostering long-term partnerships and collaboration.

See video


This disc charges drones with induction under water

Charging station (Illustrasjon: Blue Logic)

This disc charges drones with induction under water

Charging station (Illustrasjon: Blue Logic)

Read more in tu.no (in Norwegian)


Snake robot ready for caretaker job in the depths

Eely 500 from Eelume. (Foto: Eelume)

Snake robot ready for caretaker job in the depths

Eely 500 from Eelume. (Foto: Eelume)

A snake robot will soon replace divers and small submarines in the North Sea. First, it will train and test in Trondheimsfjorden.

Read more in forskning.no (in Norwegian)

Read more in gemini.no (in Norwegian)

Read more in DN (in Norwegian)


Seminars at NTNU AMOS

International Workshop on Autonomous Systems Safety

Dates:  11. - 13. March 2019

Venue: Scandic Nidelven, Trondheim, Norway

See the website for program and topics.

International Workshop on Autonomous Systems Safety

Dates:  11. - 13. March 2019

Venue: Scandic Nidelven, Trondheim, Norway

See the website for program and topics.

The First International Workshop on Autonomous Systems Safety (IWASS) gathers key experts in autonomous systems safety from academia and industry. IWASS aims to identify common challenges related to safety, reliability, and security (SRS) of autonomous systems, covering autonomous maritime, marine, land vehicles, and aerospace systems, and to discuss and propose possible solutions for the identified challenges.

 

 
 

Guest lecture by Joao Sousa, 20 February, Mobile connectivity and mobile locality in networked vehicle systems: are we missing something?

20 February 2019 at 10:15-11:00
Room D251, Elektro-D

Guest lecture by Joao Sousa, 20 February, Mobile connectivity and mobile locality in networked vehicle systems: are we missing something?

20 February 2019 at 10:15-11:00
Room D251, Elektro-D

Professor João Tasso de Figueiredo Borges de Sousa, Porto University & NTNU

Recent and exciting developments in multi-vehicle systems for maritime operations are presented along with projections of future research challenges lying at the intersection of control and computation. First, a novel approach to find, track and sample dynamic features of the ocean with a multi-vehicle system is briefly described as background for assessing potential future ocean operations. Second, we show that this is a system in which physical and computational entities evolve, interact and communicate within an environment that can also be modified by the actions of those entities. Third, we revisit Y. C. Ho’s generalized control framework – in which there is more than one criterion and more than one intelligent controller, each of which having access to different information – to suggest that we may have been missing something in coordination and control since 1970. Fourth, we review the pioneering work on systems with evolving structure of the late Turing award-winner Robin Milner; the focus is on computational processes, reaction rules, and mobile connectivity and mobile locality, all intrinsic to networked multi-vehicle systems, but missing in most of the control literature. Finally, we discuss how the control and computation challenges arising in multi-vehicle systems can be addressed in the framework of coupled physical and computational dynamics and show how these challenges can be formulated as problems of optimization, invariance, and attainability in extended state-control spaces.

Biography

João Tasso de Figueiredo Borges de Sousa is with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department from Porto University in Portugal. He holds a PhD and an MSc in Electrical Engineering, both awarded by Porto University. His research interests include autonomous underwater, surface and air vehicles, planning and execution control for networked vehicle systems, optimization and control, cyber-physical systems, and applications of networked vehicle systems to the ocean sciences, security and defense.

He is the head of the Laboratório de Sistemas e Tecnologias Subaquáticas – LSTS (Underwater Systems and Technologies Laboratory). The LSTS (https://www.lsts.pt/) has pioneered the design, construction and deployment of networked underwater, surface and air vehicles for applications in ocean sciences, security and defense. Major accomplishments include the design of the award-winning Light Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (LAUV), the LSTS open source software tool chain for networked vehicle systems (https://www.lsts.pt/toolchain), and the annual Rapid Environmental Picture Atlantic exercise, organized in cooperation with the Portuguese Navy since 2010, and with the Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation since 2014. The LSTS received the Arca second Prize for the best technological realizations Respectful to Environment in 2003 and the national BES Innovation National Award for the design of the Light Autonomous Underwater Vehicle in 2006.

He was awarded the Luso-American Foundation Fellowship by the Portuguese Studies Program from the University of California at Berkeley in 2002. He received an outstanding teaching award from Porto University in 2008.

He has been involved in fostering and growing a world-wide research community in this field with yearly conferences and workshops in the areas of Hybrid Systems, Networked Vehicle Systems and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. He has been lecturing on networked vehicle systems in renowned universities in the United States of America and Europe. He is a member of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Multi-robots Systems Technical Committee and of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) Marine Systems Technical Committee. He was the chair of the 2013 edition of the IFAC Navigation, Guidance and Control Workshop and is the chair of the 2018 IEEE AUV Symposium. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Swedish Marine Robotics Center. He is in the editorial board of several scientific journals. He is a member of several NATO committees. He has authored over 300 publications, including 30 journal papers.