News and events at NTNU AMOS in 2017


 

NTNU AMOS Days 2017

NTNU AMOS employees, associates and partners at NTNU AMOS Days November 9th 2017. Photo by Børge Rokseth, NTNU.

NTNU AMOS Days 2017

NTNU AMOS employees, associates and partners at NTNU AMOS Days November 9th 2017. Photo by Børge Rokseth, NTNU.

AMOS Days was held November 9th 2017 at Scandic Hotel Lerkendal in Trondheim. Over 100 participants listened to NTNU AMOS researchers present their latest work, rooting in good discussions where the NTNU AMOS partners gave their ideas and input.

See the programme.

Also this year, the quality of the presentations and the presented research was very high. The presentations can be found below.

Presentations

Acting NTNU AMOS Director Thor I. Fossen Welcome and overview of NTNU AMOS

PhD candidate Jørgen Sverdrup-Thygeson Applications and challenges for underwater swimming manipulators

PhD candidate Stein Melvær Nornes  ROV-based photogrammetry for marine sciences

PhD candidate Trygve Olav Fossum Adaptive data collection: What robots can do for ocean science

PhD candidate Anthony Hovenburg Design of a new UAV for marine operations

PhD candidate Mariusz Grøtte Coordinated ocean observations with hyperspectral imagers in small satellites and UAVs

Researcher Dr. Kristian Klausen From research to spinoff with Scout AS: Catching drones and inspecting ships

PhD candidate Mahdi Ghane Condition monitoring of wind turbine drivetrain

PhD candidate Woongshik Nam  Response assessment of structures subjected to cryogenic spills or in Arctic conditions - Modeling ductile/brittle transition behavior with large shell elements

PhD candidate Jan-Tore Horn Modelling of short- and long-term directional loads in design of offshore wind turbines

PhD candidate Mohd Atif Siddiqui  Experimental and numerical analysis of a damaged ship section in waves

Professor Claudio Lugni  Challenges in hydrodynamic model testing of marine structures in depressurized conditions

Professor Trygve Kristiansen  Recent hydrodynamic investigations – Floating solar islands and ringing of offshore wind turbines


Finn Christian W. Hanssen have won the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Hydrodynamics 2017

Finn Christian W. Hanssen

Finn Christian W. Hanssen have won the Moan-Faltinsen Best Paper Award on Marine Hydrodynamics 2017

Finn Christian W. Hanssen

The awarded paper is ‘Free-Surface Tracking in 2D with the Harmonic Polynomial Cell Method: Two Alternative Strategies’, which was published in International Journal of Numerical Methods in Engineering and written by Finn-Christian Hanssen, Andrea Bardazzi, Claudio Lugni and Marilena Greco.


The AMOS affiliated scientist Josef Kiendl at Department of Marine Technology has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher 2017 by Clarivate Analytics (former Thomson Reuters)

Josef Kiendl

The AMOS affiliated scientist Josef Kiendl at Department of Marine Technology has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher 2017 by Clarivate Analytics (former Thomson Reuters)

Josef Kiendl


Research campaign at the West Coast of Norway

Research campaign at the West Coast of Norway

NTNU AMOS in cooperation with Runde Miljøsenter, NGU, Kartverket, Maritime Robotics, and Havforskningsinstituttet carried out a research campaign at the West Coast of Norway – Søndre Sunnmøre and Runde bird island. The objective of the research campaign was to investigate the reasons for the decline in sea birds at Runde in conjunction to access on food in the water column and seabed. In addition, new sea bed mapping technology was tested out using Unmanned Surface Vehicles, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, Remotely Operated Vehicles and ships.

Media coverage


Professors Ludvigsen and Johnsen set up lab for testing autonomous underwater robots on the seabed of the Trondheim fjord

Professors Ludvigsen and Johnsen set up lab for testing autonomous underwater robots on the seabed of the Trondheim fjord

Read about the operation and their plans for the lab in Adresseavisen: "Roboter blir gode på bunnen" (28 June 2017)

Prof. Torgeir Moan receives ASME Lifetime Achievement Award

Prof. Torgeir Moan received the ASME Lifetime Achievement Award at the OMAE 2017-conference in Trondheim 26 June 2017 "in grateful recognition of significant life-time contributions to Risk and...

Prof. Torgeir Moan receives ASME Lifetime Achievement Award

Prof. Torgeir Moan received the ASME Lifetime Achievement Award at the OMAE 2017-conference in Trondheim 26 June 2017 "in grateful recognition of significant life-time contributions to Risk and Reliability of Marine Structures".

Prof. Sørensen comments on the digitalization in the marine industry and on autonomous ferries

Autonomy in ship operations was one of the main topics at a conference in Fosnavåg this June where NTNU AMOS participated. In conjunction with the conference, Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen gave...

Prof. Sørensen comments on the digitalization in the marine industry and on autonomous ferries

Autonomy in ship operations was one of the main topics at a conference in Fosnavåg this June where NTNU AMOS participated.

In conjunction with the conference, Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen gave some interviews:


Prof. Moan is one of three NTNU professors among the 10 top researchers in Norway with the most publication points in CRIStin

Prof. Moan is one of three NTNU professors among the 10 top researchers in Norway with the most publication points in CRIStin


Prof. Trygve Kristiansen encourages project about collecting plastic waste from the sea

Read about it in Teknisk Ukeblad: " Norsk seismikkgigant vil samle inn plast fra havet ved å blåse den opp til overflaten " (6 June 2017)

Prof. Trygve Kristiansen encourages project about collecting plastic waste from the sea


Adj. Prof. Claudio Lugni publishes a paper about rogue waves in the renowned "Scientific Reports" with his colleagues

screenshot

Adj. Prof. Claudio Lugni publishes a paper about rogue waves in the renowned "Scientific Reports" with his colleagues

screenshot

Two years ago, NTNU AMOS Adj. Prof. Claudio Lugni was involved, together with Georgia Tech and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the National Transportation Safety Board, in the investigation of the accident of the ElFaro Ship. In particular, their investigation was about the occurrence of rogue waves by using the results of Lugni's HOS model and the relevant theoretical knowledge by Francecso Fedele from Georgia Tech. 

Now, their research article was accepted by the renowned journal "Scientific Reports" - see the references below.

References:

Media coverage:

 


Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen is this year's best lecturer at IMT

Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen is this year's best lecturer at IMT

Read the commentary by the students: "Årets foreleser" (11 May 2017)

NTNU AMOS is collaborating with Kjell Inge Røkke's team and WWF in the development of the Research Expedition Vessel (REV)

NTNU AMOS is collaborating with Kjell Inge Røkke's team and WWF in the development of the Research Expedition Vessel (REV)

Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen says the following about the project:

"REV is trailblazing in the way it targets high impact solutions caring for the oceans. This is of upmost importance for humanity. Still there is a huge lack of understandings of the processes taking place in the oceans and the coastal areas including the arctic areas. We are in hurry to understand, and actions are needed right now. Our mission is to contribute to knowledge-based management and sustainability in the value creation harvest of the resources the oceans are offering us. We trust in knowledge and competence, and a corresponding holistic view when addressing global challenges related to the oceans such as climate, environment, lack of food, energy and minerals as well as logistics and transportation. Turning the challenges into new possibilities and solutions require multi-disciplinary teams with highly skilled, competent and even more important, visionary and wise people with passion and capabilities to execute.”

Find more info on REV's website

Teknisk Ukeblad wrote a feature on the project, intervieweing among others NTNU AMOS director Prof. Asgeir J. Sørensen: "REV-designer om Røkke: – Han har øyne for detaljer. Det har vært inspirerende, men også utfordrende" (2 May 2017)

 


How can ships travelling in the Arctic maintain their position when ice pushes them in different directions? Interview with NTNU AMOS PhD graduate Øivind Kjerstad

Maritime Journal: " Better Dynamic Positioning for Operations in Ice " (24 April 2017)

How can ships travelling in the Arctic maintain their position when ice pushes them in different directions? Interview with NTNU AMOS PhD graduate Øivind Kjerstad

Maritime Journal: "Better Dynamic Positioning for Operations in Ice" (24 April 2017)

The unknown Arctic sea: commentary by Prof. Asgeir Sørensen and more

The unknown Arctic sea: commentary by Prof. Asgeir Sørensen and more

Read the commentary by Prof. Asgeir Sørensen and more in Nordlys: "Det ukjente Polhavet" (6 April 2017)


The Dynamic Positioning Lab – demonstrating the theory behind automatic positioning at sea

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The Dynamic Positioning Lab – demonstrating the theory behind automatic positioning at sea

– Blog by Prof. Roger Skjetne
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Read Profeesor Skjetne's blog on NTNU TechZone: "The Dynamic Positioning Lab – demonstrating the theory behind automatic positioning at sea" (31 March 2017)

NTNU AMOS PhD graduate becomes adjunct professor in Brazil

Daniel

NTNU AMOS PhD graduate becomes adjunct professor in Brazil

Daniel

NTNU AMOS PhD graduate Daniel de Almeida Fernandes has accepted a position as an assistant professor at the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF) in Brazil.


Christopher Rodin tests new aerial camera gimbal to assist station-keeping of ships in sea ice

Christopher Rodin tests new aerial camera gimbal to assist station-keeping of ships in sea ice

The Station Keeping Trails took place in the Bothnian Bay between Sweden and Finland in the beginning of March 2017. The purpose was to perform a variety of experiments concerning ice management and station keeping with the two anchor handling vessels Magne Viking and Tor Viking. Christopher Rodin's task was to design a camera system to be carried by Maritime Robotics' OceanEye moored balloon system in order to keep track of the size and position of ice floes surrounding the two vessels. At the same time, the trials allowed Christopher to obtain data for how well the designed camera system performs in a real world scenario. In the end the trials were a big success - everyone seemed pleased with the collected data, and they had plenty of days with beautiful weather. The trials were funded and organized by Statoil, and this particular part of the trial was conducted as a collaboration between Maritime Robotics and NTNU AMOS.


Teknisk Ukeblad wrote a profile on NTNU AMOS Prof. Kristin Y. Pettersen

Article TUArticle TU

Teknisk Ukeblad wrote a profile on NTNU AMOS Prof. Kristin Y. Pettersen

Article TUArticle TU

Read the profile in Teknisk Ukeblad: "Forsker Kristin Y. Pettersen utvikler slangeroboter, men foretrekker blyant" (22 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS PhD candidates convince female high school pupils to take a doctoral degree in technology

Read about it in Frøya Nyheter: " Mye mer positiv til teknologi-utdanning " (13 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS PhD candidates convince female high school pupils to take a doctoral degree in technology

Read about it in Frøya Nyheter: "Mye mer positiv til teknologi-utdanning" (13 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS spin-off company Ecotone invents miracle camera

NTNU AMOS spin-off company Ecotone invents miracle camera

Read more on Finansavisen: "Jakter 20 millioner til nytt NTNU-vidunder" (8 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS spin-off company BluEye starts production of underwater drones for private use

NTNU AMOS spin-off company BluEye starts production of underwater drones for private use

Media coverage:


Øivind Kåre Kjerstad interviewed about his Arctic maritime research

Photo: SAMCoT

Øivind Kåre Kjerstad interviewed about his Arctic maritime research

Photo: SAMCoT
Read the article on Gemini.no: "Lager systemer som forstår Arktis" (1 February 2017)

NTNU AMOS has received funding for new projects

One of the new projects is called "Nonlinear Autopilot Design for Extended Flight Envelopes and Operation of Fixed-Wing UAVs in Extreme Conditions" Project manager: Prof. Thor I. Fossen ...

NTNU AMOS has received funding for new projects

One of the new projects is called "Nonlinear Autopilot Design for Extended Flight Envelopes and Operation of Fixed-Wing UAVs in Extreme Conditions"
Project manager: Prof. Thor I. Fossen
2 PhD candidates and 1 postdoc
Find more info on RCN's website: "IKTPLUSS bevilger midler til FRINATEK-prosjekter" (21 January 2017)

The other new project is called "AILARON Autonomous Imaging and Learning Ai RObot identifying plaNkton taxa in-situ"
Project manager: Ass. Prof. Annette Stahl
1 PhD candidate and 1 postdoc

 


NTNU AMOS researchers write about their findings on their field trip

Periphylla

NTNU AMOS researchers write about their findings on their field trip

Periphylla

Professors Geir Johnsen and Jørgen Berge share with us their findings from the yearly field trip with the UNIS course in underwater robotics in the polar night.

Find their findings in the media features below.

Media coverage:


Prof. Geir Johnsen featured in new NTNU movie

Prof. Geir Johnsen featured in new NTNU movie

NTNU published a new movie on January 2017 about its motto: "Knowledge for a better world".

Seminars at NTNU AMOS in 2017

 

Ocean School of Innovation-workshop: Playing Lean Startup

7 December 2017 at 09:00 –16:00 
Scandic Lerkendal, Trondheim

Ocean School of Innovation-workshop: Playing Lean Startup

7 December 2017 at 09:00 –16:00 
Scandic Lerkendal, Trondheim

Lean startup is a methodology for developing businesses and products, which aims to shorten product development cycles by adopting a combination of business-hypothesis-driven experimentation, iterative product releases, and validated learning. The central hypothesis of the lean startup methodology is that if startup companies invest their time into iteratively building products or services to meet the needs of early customers, they can reduce the market risks and sidestep the need for large amounts of initial project funding and expensive product launches and failures.

Playing Lean is both a serious board game and a great workshop format, hosted by Lean Startup practitioner Tore Rasmussen from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

See the invitation for more details.


NTNU AMOS Days 2017

9 November 2017
Scandic Hotel Lerkendal, Trondheim

NTNU AMOS Days 2017

9 November 2017
Scandic Hotel Lerkendal, Trondheim

Invited parties: NTNU AMOS employees and partners

Read the programme

See the presentations!


Transformation of intellectual property in the university arena

28 September 2017 at 9:00-15:30
Scandic Solsiden, Beddingen1, 7014 Trondheim

Transformation of intellectual property in the university arena

– by Ocean School of Innovation
28 September 2017 at 9:00-15:30
Scandic Solsiden, Beddingen1, 7014 Trondheim

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California Los Angeles, USA, on the Inference Under Uncertainty: from Observation to Conclusion

11 September 2017 at 11:15-12:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Ali Mosleh, University of California Los Angeles, USA, on the Inference Under Uncertainty: from Observation to Conclusion

11 September 2017 at 11:15-12:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

Professor Ali Mosleh from UCLA who is an appointed International Chair and Adjunct Professor at our IMT will give a guest lecture on the topic "Inference Under Uncertainty: from Observation to Conclusion”.

The lecture should be particularly interesting for those working with Bayesian statistics and belief networks.


Guest lecture by Dr Erkan Kayacan, University of Illinois, USA, on Nonlinear Observers for Systems with Uncertainties

21 August 2017 at 13:15-14:00 
Room B343, Elektro Bld., Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Erkan Kayacan, University of Illinois, USA, on Nonlinear Observers for Systems with Uncertainties

21 August 2017 at 13:15-14:00 
Room B343, Elektro Bld., Gløshaugen

Abstract

In robust controller design, controllers intend to achieve the best control performance in the presence of the worst uncertainties, and the use of a high controller gain is the general method to handle the effect of uncertainties in nonlinear control theory. However, such a strategy causes massive control actions, so very powerful actuators are demanded to perform unnecessarily large control actions. Furthermore, the robust control performance is mostly obtained at a price of sacrificing the nominal control performance of the system, because the nominal control performance is not taken into account in robust controller design. Therefore, a control method is required to maintain the nominal control performance in the absence of uncertainties and exhibit robust control performance in the presence of uncertainties. In this talk, I will demonstrate two methods: 1) a real-time optimization-based nonlinear observer to estimate not only unmeasurable states but also unknown parameters 2) a self-learning disturbance observer. In the first method, a nonlinear moving horizon estimator is designed for systems that have constrained states and parameters. In the second method, the basic nonlinear disturbance observer is used in the estimation scheme for the self-learning disturbance observer to provide a conventional estimation law, which is used as being the learning error for the neuro-fuzzy system (NFS). Thus, the NFS learns uncertainties, and eventually takes the overall control of the estimation signal completely in a very short time and gives unbiased estimation results for the disturbance. A few real-time implementations on custom-design agricultural robotic systems will also be introduced. 

Bio

Erkan Kayacan received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in mechanical engineering from Istanbul Technical University, Turkey, in 2008 and 2010, respectively. In December 2014, he received the Ph.D. degree at University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium. During his PhD, he held a visitor PhD scholar position at Boston University for 5 months under supervision of Prof. Calin Belta. After his Ph.D., he became a Postdoctoral Researcher with Delft Center for Systems and Control, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. He is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher with Coordinated Science Lab and Distributed Autonomous Systems Lab in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign under supervision of Assist. Prof. Girish Chowdhary. His research interests center around real-time optimization-based control and estimation methods, and learning algorithms with a heavy emphasis on applications to autonomous systems.


Guest lectures by Dr Philip McGillivary and Joshua Baghdady

26 June 2017 at 11:15-12:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lectures by Dr Philip McGillivary and Joshua Baghdady

26 June 2017 at 11:15-12:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

Titles:

«How remote sensing technologies are advancing communication needs for unmanned systems» by Philip McGillivary

“Underwater optical communication link using Wavelength Division Multiplexing, Polarization Division Multiplexing and Orbital Angular Momentum Multiplexing” by Joshua Baghdady

Short bio: Philip McGillivary

As Science Liaison for Coast Guard PACAREA, Dr. Phil McGillivary coordinates science issues for the Coast Guard for the Pacific Ocean. His responsibilities include management of science conducted using Coast Guard aircraft, buoytenders, and other assets, as well as high latitude science conducted on icebreakers managed by the Coast Guard.  He previously worked in the Office of Secretary of Defense after a post-doc at NOAA in Monterey, California through a joint appointment with the Naval Postgraduate School, and an earlier post-doc at the Marine Science Institute of the University of California, Santa Barbara.  His doctorate in Ecology from the University of Georgia on biogeochemical fluxes at fronts along the Gulf Stream followed employment at the NOAA oceanographic laboratory in Miami, Florida.  His experience includes more than two years at sea on research vessels and submersibles.  He is currently a member of the Arctic Council Unmanned Aircraft Expert Working Group, and has been a member of the FAA Unmanned Aircraft Remote Operating Area Working Group (ROAWG) and previously a member of the Navy/National Science Foundation Scientific Committee on Oceanographic Aircraft Research (SCOAR).   

Short bio: Joshua Baghdady

Joshua Baghdady is a Master’s student at Clemson University, where he has been working in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies.  His work in the Micro-photonics Lab has centered on underwater high bandwidth optical communications.  He has eight referred publications on this topic, the most recent of which won the Marine Technology Society Best Student Paper award at the 2016 Ocean Science meeting.  He is focused on developing and testing high bandwidth underwater optical communications technologies as an essential component of ocean observing systems.


NTNU-FFI-seminar

8 June 2017 at 9:00-15:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

NTNU-FFI-seminar

8 June 2017 at 9:00-15:00
Auditorium T1, Marine Technology Centre

NTNU and the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) hold a seminar where researchers both from NTNU as well as from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) give many interesting presentations.

Agenda

08.55

Welcome

Kristin Y. Pettersen and Martin Ludvigsen (NTNU)

09.00

Autonomous passenger ferries – a new solution for smart city transportation

Egil Eide (NTNU)

09.15

Robotic vision - applications and projects

Annette Stahl (NTNU)

09.30

Use of enabling technology for marine science applications

Geir Johnsen (NTNU)

09.45

Target tracking: foundations in point process theory and applications in maritime collision avoidance

Edmund Brekke (NTNU)

10.00

Finding historical wrecks in deep waters - examples from Skagerrak

Øyvind Ødegård (NTNU)

10.15

ROV-based photogrammetry for marine benthic mapping

Stein Melvær Nornes (NTNU)

10.30

Break

10.45

AUV applications with increased autonomy

Martin Ludvigsen (NTNU)

11.00

An intelligent icing protection solution for unmanned aircraft

Kim Lynge Sørensen (NTNU)

11.15

Risk management and risk control of autonomous marine systems and operations

Ingrid Utne (NTNU)

11.30

Distributed autonomy

Sondre Engebråten (FFI)

11.45

Automated decision-making

Rikke Amilde Løvlid (FFI)

12.00

Lunch

13.00

Dynamic route planning

Solveig Bruvoll (FFI)

13.15

Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV)

Kim Mathiassen (FFI)

13.30

Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV)

Torstein Olsmo Sæbø (FFI)

13.45

Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USV)

Jarle Sandrib (FFI)

14.00

Break

14.15

Scene analysis

Martin Vonheim Larsen (FFI)

14.30

Collision avoidance

Martin Syre Wiig (FFI/NTNU)

14.45

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)

Morten Hansbø (FFI)

 


Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, U.C. Berkeley, USA, on "Scalable Reachability Computations for Nonlinear Systems using Contraction Theory"

23 May 2017 at 14:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Murat Arcak, U.C. Berkeley, USA, on "Scalable Reachability Computations for Nonlinear Systems using Contraction Theory"

23 May 2017 at 14:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Reachability analysis is critical for obtaining formal safety and performance guarantees for nonlinear and hybrid dynamical systems. However existing computational tools do not scale to models with more than a few state variables. In this talk we present a scalable procedure to compute tight over-approximations of reachable sets.  We first sample a number of trajectories of the system and next establish a tight bound on the divergence between the samples and neighboring trajectories using the concept of matrix measures from contraction theory. The divergence bounds also account for the accumulation of numerical simulation errors along simulation traces, which means that the proposed method provides a guaranteed over-approximation of the reachable set.  We demonstrate that the proposed technique scales well to systems with a large number of states.

Biography

Murat Arcak is a professor at U.C. Berkeley in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department.  He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey (1996) and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1997 and 2000). His research is in dynamical systems and control theory with applications to synthetic biology, multi-agent systems, and transportation. Prior to joining Berkeley in 2008, he was a faculty member at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2003, the Donald P. Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in 2006, the Control and Systems Theory Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in 2007, and the Antonio Ruberti Young Researcher Prize from the IEEE Control Systems Society in 2014. He is a member of SIAM and a fellow of IEEE.


Ocean School of Innovation Pitching Session: Feed Your Curiosity

4 May 2017 at 11:15-12:00
Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, Trondheim

Ocean School of Innovation Pitching Session: Feed Your Curiosity

4 May 2017 at 11:15-12:00
Radisson Blu Royal Garden Hotel, Trondheim

Among others, two of NTNU AMOS' PhD candidates will pitch their research:

  • Erik Wilthil, “Target tracking for maritime collision avoidance”
  • Siri Holthe Mathisen, “Precision Drop from Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles”

Find more information on the session's homepage


Ocean Week 2017: Unraveling the unmanned

3-5 May 2017
Radisson Blu Royal Garden, Trondheim

Ocean Week 2017: Unraveling the unmanned

3-5 May 2017
Radisson Blu Royal Garden, Trondheim

NTNU Ocean Week 2017: Unraveling the unmanned

3-5 May 2017
Radisson Blu Royal Garden, Trondheim

NTNU Ocean Week 2017: Unraveling the unmanned

3-5 May 2017
Radisson Blu Royal Garden, Trondheim

Guest lecture by Andreas Bartl, Technical University of Munich, Germany, on Real-Time-Substructuring: Towards a Hardware-In-The-Loop approach in Structural Mechanics

27 April at 12:30-13:30
Havrommet (A1), Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Andreas Bartl, Technical University of Munich, Germany, on Real-Time-Substructuring: Towards a Hardware-In-The-Loop approach in Structural Mechanics

27 April at 12:30-13:30
Havrommet (A1), Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

Real-Time-Substructuring is a Hardware-in-the-Loop technique in the domain of structural mechanics, which combines physical tests with simulations. Applied to noise, vibration and harshness problems, Real-Time-Substructuring allows testing components of complex systems and their effects under realistic boundary conditions. The method can be used in cases where the setup of the full system in the laboratory requires high efforts and costs or where the virtual component is modified frequently during the design process. The Hardware-in-the-Loop concept allows to take into account non-linear effects of the physical component as well as effects, which are not included in the model, such as temperature changes during the test. Real-Time-Substructuring can enable a rapid prototyping approach as modifications on the physical component show direct acoustic and vibrational effects on the physical system.

In the talk, current research on Real-Time-Substructuring at the Chair of Applied Mechanics at the Technical University of Munich will be presented. A use case, which is currently worked on, is the design process of an automotive transmission crossbeam. Additionally, control strategies for Real Time Substructuring, which are used at the Technical University of Munich will be presented.


Guest lecture series by Antonio Loria on on stability and stabilization of nonlinear time-varying systems, including cascaded systems theory

3 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
4 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
5 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
6 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
7 April at 09:15-11:00 and 13:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture series by Antonio Loria on on stability and stabilization of nonlinear time-varying systems, including cascaded systems theory

3 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
4 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
5 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
6 April at 10:15-12:00 and 13:15-15:00
7 April at 09:15-11:00 and 13:15-15:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

The lectures are part of the PhD-course TK8103 Advanced Nonlinear Control at NTNU, but anyone else who is interested is welcome to attend the lectures. 

Guest lecture by Dr Erlend Kristiansen, COMSOL Multiphysics, on how commercial finite-element software such as COMSOL Multiphysics is used in practice

28 March 2017 at 10:15-12:00 
Room KJL5, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Erlend Kristiansen, COMSOL Multiphysics, on how commercial finite-element software such as COMSOL Multiphysics is used in practice

28 March 2017 at 10:15-12:00 
Room KJL5, Gløshaugen

Abstract:

The main topic of Erlend's presentation will be about how commercial finite-element software such as COMSOL Multiphysics is used in practice. He will introduce the finite-element method and some aspect about the implementation in COMSOL. Moreover, he will demonstrate COMSOL Multiphysics on some demo models. 

Short bio:

During Erlend's PhD studies, he worked on mathematical modelling of hydrodynamic memory-effects in marine cybernetics.

Afterwards, he worked at Fedem Technology AS, Sintef Fisheries and Aquaculture and Atmel Norway with mathematical modelling and developing of simulation software.

Since 2012, he has been working at COMSOL Multiphysics. 


Guest lecture by Prof. Jay Farrell, University of California, Riverside, USA, on "Reliable Precise State Estimation for Autonomous Highway Vehicles"

24 March 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Prof. Jay Farrell, University of California, Riverside, USA, on "Reliable Precise State Estimation for Autonomous Highway Vehicles"

24 March 2017 at 10:15-11:00
Room B343, Elektro Bld. D, Gløshaugen

Abstract

Autonomous and wirelessly connected vehicles face various challenges before effective commercial deployment. Key among these challenges is accurate and reliable awareness of world interactions. Awareness arises from onboard sensors and from ubiquitous communication between vehicles and infrastructure. Vehicle coordination and safety specifications necessitate reliable “where-in-lane” (i.e., decimeter accuracy) knowledge of vehicle position relative to other vehicles and the environment. This presentation will address vehicle state estimation with a focus on high precision and reliability.

Sensor fusion is critical to achieving these application requirements. Several of the sensors (e.g., vision, radar, Lidar, ultrasound, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)) have various spurious measurement types. Standard Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) approaches are not sufficiently reliable at removing the effects of such spurious measurements because the EKF approach must decide at the time each measurement arrives whether it is valid. If deemed as valid, the measurement is used and discarded; otherwise it is not used and discarded. When that decision is wrong, either measurement information is lost or the state and covariance estimates are corrupted. Either situation can result in divergence of the EKF.

An alternative is to maintain all recent measurement data within a moving time-horizon. This window of data can be processed within a Bayesian framework to extract the optimal state trajectory estimate over the time-horizon. Because the time window of data is maintained it is straightforward to change the assumptions as to which data are valid and reprocess the data, allowing consideration of multiple fault scenario assumptions. Therefore, this approach is referred to as a Contemplative Real-Time (CRT) estimator. It is closely related to Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). This presentation will review the interrelationships between the EKF, Iterated Extended Kalman Filter (IEKF), and CRT within the Bayesian framework; discuss fault accommodation; present comparative experimental results; and discuss recent results on computationally efficient carrier phase integer ambiguity resolution over time windows.

Short bio

Jay A. Farrell is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Riverside. He earned B.S. degrees in physics and electrical engineering from Iowa State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Notre Dame. At Charles Stark Draper Lab (1989-1994), he received the Engineering Vice President's Best Technical Publication Award in 1990, and Recognition Awards for Outstanding Performance and Achievement in 1991 and 1993. He has served the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) as Finance Chair for three IEEE CDC`s (`95, `01, and `03), on the Board of Governors for two terms (`03-`06, `12-`14), as Vice President Finance and Vice President of Technical Activities,  as General Chair of IEEE CDC 2012, and as President in 2014. He was named a GNSS Leader to Watch for 2009-2010 by GPS World Magazine in May 2009 and a winner of the Connected Vehicle Technology Challenge by the U.S. Department of Transportation`s (DOT`s) Research and Innovative Technology Administration in July 2011. He is author of over 250 technical publications, and three books, a Distinguished Member of IEEE CSS, a Fellow of AAAS, and a Fellow of the IEEE.


PhD course on Intrapreneurship and Business Model Canvas

7 March 2017 at 12-16:00
Clarion Hotel and Congress, Brattørkaia 1, Trondheim

PhD course on Intrapreneurship and Business Model Canvas

7 March 2017 at 12-16:00
Clarion Hotel and Congress, Brattørkaia 1, Trondheim

Innovation Lunch "Behind the scenes of MemfoACT AS"

22 February 2017 at 11:30-12:30
NTNU Gløshaugen

Innovation Lunch "Behind the scenes of MemfoACT AS"

22 February 2017 at 11:30-12:30
NTNU Gløshaugen

Guest lecture by Dr Ali Khalighi, École Centrale Marseille, France, on “Attaining Unprecedentedly High Data-Rates in Underwater Environments by Visible Light Communications"

17 February 2017 12:00-12:40
Bestikken, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Dr Ali Khalighi, École Centrale Marseille, France, on “Attaining Unprecedentedly High Data-Rates in Underwater Environments by Visible Light Communications"

17 February 2017 12:00-12:40
Bestikken, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract:

Today we are witnessing a growing need to high-rate data transmission in underwater missions in a wide range of application areas. In particular, with the increasing use of robotics in underwater missions and the recent advances in the design and development of AUVs, there is an urgent need for broadband underwater links.  Recently, visible light communications have received particular attention due to their potential in providing very high-rate data transmission. In the challenging underwater context, the major impairments of the communication link include high beam attenuation, especially in high turbidity waters, and link misalignments. We provide an overview on VLC systems in underwater environments and explain the main considerations on the impact of the underwater channel and the transmission schemes. We present the current research activities in Fresnel Institute and also some future research directions for improving the performance and reliability of these links.

Short biography:

Dr. Ali Khalighi is an Associate Professor in École Centrale Marseille and head of “Telecommunications and Antenna Processing” in Fresnel Institute research lab. His main research areas of interest include signal processing for wireless communication systems with an emphasis on the physical layer aspects of free-space, underwater, and indoor visible-light optical communications. So far he has served as the Technical Program Committee member for more than 20 international conferences and workshops in the communications area. Also, he was the Vice Chair of WG2 of the FP7 IC1101 COST Action on optical wireless communications. Dr. Khalighi is the recipient of the Scientific Excellence Award from the French Ministry of Research and Higher Education for the period of 2009–2017.


Guest lecture by Prof. Bernard Molin, École Centrale de Marseille, France, on “Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with multiple vertical cylinders”

11 January 2017 14:00-14:45
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Guest lecture by Prof. Bernard Molin, École Centrale de Marseille, France, on “Experimental and numerical study of the sloshing motion in a rectangular tank with multiple vertical cylinders”

11 January 2017 14:00-14:45
Auditorium T2, Marine Technology Centre

Abstract

Sloshing tests are performed on a rectangular tank filled with bottom-mounted vertical cylinders, around the natural frequency of the first sloshing mode. The numbers and heights of the cylinders are varied. From the position of the resonance peak an experimental dispersion equation is derived, and compared with different formulations from literature. A new formulation is proposed. A modal approach is then applied to derive the RAO of the sloshing response, and compared with the experimental results.

Short bio

Professor Bernard Molin has for the last years been a professor at École Centrale de Marseille. His research activities have been mainly concerned with nonlinear hydrodynamics (drift forces, slow drift motion, high frequency loads and response), and development of computer models for the French offshore industry. Recent involvement has included hydrodynamics of perforated structures, Vortex Induced Vibrations, slamming, moon-pool resonances, hydroelastic responses, sloshing in tanks and motion coupling, run-up effects and slow-drift excitation.