Physics Friday Colloquia

– Spring 2016

Department of Physics organizes a series of colloquia. Friday's colloquium is open to everyone. If you desire coffee/tea and something sweet, please meet up at 14:00 in the lunchroom D5-175.

Time: Friday at 14:15 - 15:00

Location: Realfagbygget R10


Friday colloquia Spring 2016

March 4

Roger Freedman, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
«Active learning in lower division physics - flipping the traditional lecture»

March 4

Roger Freedman, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
«Active learning in lower division physics - flipping the traditional lecture»

Abstract

Active learning in lower division physics - flipping the traditional lecture

How can we best help our students learn introductory physics?

Research from across the STEM curriculum shows that traditional lecture-based instruction leads to limited learning gains, while an active-learning approach --- in which students spend much of their class time engaged in discussion and problem-solving --- is measurably more effective.

In this presentation I'll describe my experiences with using active learning in introductory physics, and explain an easy-to-implement course structure that keeps students more directly involved with the subject matter. This will be an interactive presentation, so come ready to participate!

Roger Freedman will be available for discussions during the day please contact me if you are interested.

Erik Wahlström, Coordinator

March 11

Aksel Tjora, Department of Sociology and Political Science (NTNU)
«Punk as academic attitude: Connecting students and professors by collective creativity»

March 11

Aksel Tjora, Department of Sociology and Political Science (NTNU)
«Punk as academic attitude: Connecting students and professors by collective creativity»

Depending on audience the lecture will be given in Norwegian or English

Punk as academic attitude: Connecting students and professors by collective creativity

or/eller

En pønktilnærming til faglig fellesskap - Senkede skuldre mellom studenter og professorer, som grunnlag for akademisk fellesskap og faglig kreativitet

Foredraget baserer seg på Professor Aksel Tjoras kronikk i Universitetsavisa Kun pønken kan berge NTNU om vekten av åpenhet, nysgjerrighet og læring i et universitetsmiljø, og hvordan man arbeidet med å skape et miljø som baserer seg på dette ved Sosiologisk poliklinikk

Mer om Aksel Tjora

Open post, Aksel Tjora: In defence of academic obstinacy (New University Norway)

Aksel Tjora blogg

Aksel Tjora (Academia)

Fri, 01 Apr 2016 11:41:48 +0200

March 18

Marios Valavanides, Technological Educational Institute of Athens (TEI), Greece
«Multi-phase flows in porous media: Recent advances and new challenges in the development of the DeProF theory for steady-state flow»

March 18

Marios Valavanides, Technological Educational Institute of Athens (TEI), Greece
«Multi-phase flows in porous media: Recent advances and new challenges in the development of the DeProF theory for steady-state flow»

Abstract

Multi-phase flows in porous media: Recent advances and new challenges in the development of the DeProF theory for steady-state flow

Multi-phase flow in porous media is a core physical process within a broad spectrum of energy, environmental and industrial applications. To date, the characterization and modeling of multiphase flows in porous media has delivered promising theoretical and experimental results over a hierarchy of scales (pore-to-production). Nevertheless, integration across those scales remains an outstanding problem. Likewise, technological progress has enabled laboratory studies to expose latent flow mechanisms; pore-scale phenomena and critical interstitial physical quantities can now be identified and assessed digitally, computationally or experimentally. At the same time, pragmatic sustainability issues on energy production/management shifted “recovery increase” trends into “process efficiency optimization” scopes and targets. As a consequence, new challenges emerge within a wide spectrum of technological problems, extending from laboratory scales, e.g. design systematic protocols for regular/special core analysis (R/SCAL) for data collection/interpretation, to industrial scales, e.g. unconventional/ enhanced oil recovery (EOR) /carbon capture & sequestration (CCS), soil & aquifer pollution & remediation or operation of trickle-bed reactors.

To address these issues we need to think “out of the box” and decide to explore the untapped interdisciplinary potential of theoretical tools and methodologies. DeProF comprise a modelling/theoretical platform for developing a consistent theory for two-phase flow in p.m. along a number of disruptive directions, such as:

  1. Disconnected flow - a substantial and many times prevailing flow pattern.
  2. Inherent degrees of freedom - nested within the physics of multi-phase flows even under steady-state flow conditions.
  3. Independent variables - reappraise the set without surrendering a specific-enough representation of the process phenomenology by oversimplification.

The scope of the lecture(s) is to present an overview of the current status of the DeProF theory and to elaborate synergies between interested researchers as, indicatively,

  1. Implementation of rational thermodynamics or statistical mechanics principles to provide a better understanding and/or rigorous justification of process phenomenology.
  2. Design of efficient experimental protocols that will bridge modelling with data interpretation and application into practical problems.
  3. Other ideas/approaches integrating current knowledge into a unified theory for multi-phase flow in porous media.

Marios Valavanides, Associate Professor, TEI Athens

Fri, 01 Apr 2016 11:43:38 +0200

April 1

Miguel Rubi, University of Barcelona, Spain
«Working under confinement»

April 1

Miguel Rubi, University of Barcelona, Spain
«Working under confinement»
Abstract

Working under confinement

How does confinement alter the transport properties of colloidal particles, the functionalities of molecular machines and in general the mechanisms of energy-transfer and energy-conversion at small scales? This question, fundamental for the modelling of soft-matter systems and biological systems, is attracting the interest of many researchers in the field. In a basic model proposed, confinement is modelled through an entropic potential. It has been shown that transport through entropic barriers or entropic transport exhibits peculiar characteristics very different from those observed when activation takes place through energetic barriers.

In this talk, I will review the main features of entropic transport and its applications to soft-matter and biological systems. I will show that confinement plays a very important role in the mechanisms of energy-conversion at the nanoscale, in particular in the functionality of molecular machines.

Miguel Rubi is Honorary doctor at NTNU 2016

Miguel Rubi

Honorary doctors NTNU

NTNU får to nye æresdoktorer (Universitetsavisa)

Doctoral Awards Ceremony 11 March 2016

The Doctoral Awards Ceremony

Doctoral Awards Ceremony 11 March 2016

Speeches during the cermony

Speech by Signe Kjelstrup to the Honorary Doctor Rubi [pdf]

Speech by Professor Miguel Rubi [pdf]

Fri, 01 Apr 2016 11:45:18 +0200

April 21, Thursday

Kai Rossnagel, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany
«Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electron materials»

April 21, Thursday

Kai Rossnagel, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Germany
«Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electron materials»

The talk will be in D4-132 at 14:15 on thursday 21. April

Kai will introduce ultrafast time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and relate this to correlated materials: materials in which strong electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions lead to cooperative phenomena such as (high-temperature) superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions, or density-wave formation. He will present some example results obtained from reference materials with a particular focus on layered transition-metal dichalcogenides.

Justin Wells


Abstract

Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electron materials

The recent development of ultrashort-pulsed photon sources operating in the extreme ultraviolet to hard x-ray regime, namely laboratory-based high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources and kilometer-scale free-electron lasers (FELs), has opened broad avenues in the study of molecular and materials dynamics on the time scales of fundamental atomic and electronic processes. One popular approach is to take stroboscopic diffraction patterns of molecules and crystals, thus capturing the motion of atoms in reciprocal space in real time. This is often referred to as molecular movie making. Yet equally fascinating is the idea to use the ultrafast short-wavelength HHG and FEL radiation to shoot electronic structure movies [1], i.e., to directly observe what the electrons are doing on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Here the method of choice is time-resolved (pump-probe) photoemission spectroscopy, specifically time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy ("trARPES") to probe the momentum-dependent valence-electron dynamics [2] and time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy ("trXPS") to probe the atomic-site specific dynamics of the core electrons [3].

The great allure of time-resolved photoemission is that it can provide direct and novel insight into the ultrafast microscopic dynamics of correlated electron materials—materials in which strong electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions lead to cooperative phenomena such as (high-temperature) superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions, or density-wave formation. In this talk, after a brief introduction to the concepts and technology of electronic structure movie making, I will present some example results obtained from reference materials [2-6] with a particular focus on layered transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  1. K. Rossnagel, Synch. Rad. News 25:5, 12 (2012)
  2. T. Rohwer et al., Nature 471, 490 (2011)
  3. S. Hellmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 187401 (2010)
  4. S. Hellmann et al., Nature Commun. 3, 1069 (2012)
  5. L. X. Yang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 207001 (2014)
  6. C. Sohrt et al., Faraday Discuss. 171, 243 (2014)
Mon, 09 May 2016 15:43:45 +0200

May 6

Robert L. Byer, Stanford University, California, USA
«Accelerator on a Chip: Recent Progress (700MeV/m). A Path to TeV Energy Scale Physics and Table Top Coherent X-rays»

May 6

Robert L. Byer, Stanford University, California, USA
«Accelerator on a Chip: Recent Progress (700MeV/m). A Path to TeV Energy Scale Physics and Table Top Coherent X-rays»

Abstract

Accelerator on a Chip: Recent Progress (700MeV/m)

Robert L. ByerA Path to TeV Energy Scale Physics and Table Top Coherent X-rays

Dielectric Laser Accelerators, accelerators on a chip, offer a new approach to the next generation of accelerators.  The recently demonstrated gradient of 700MeV/m is a first step toward an accelerator on-a-chip fabricated using modern lithographic methods. Accelerators on a chip enable attosecond physics from the XUV to X-ray region and open the possibility of TeV energy scale physics in the future.

Accelerator on a Chip: Recent Progress (700MeV/m) - A Path to TeV Energy Scale Physics and Table Top Coherent X-rays  [pdf]

Wed, 01 Jun 2016 10:17:34 +0200

May 13

Alain Gibaud, Université du Maine, France
«On the investigation of calcium carbonate coccospheres by x-ray coherent diffraction imaging»

May 13

Alain Gibaud, Université du Maine, France
«On the investigation of calcium carbonate coccospheres by x-ray coherent diffraction imaging»

Abstract

On the investigation of calcium carbonate coccospheres by x-ray coherent diffraction imaging

Porous calcium carbonate particles are attracting large attention wide world due to their biocompatibility and possibility to be used in drug delivery.

Such particles can be synthesized by direct precipitation or by using  different organic templates and/or additives. In nature, they are most of the time produced via the use of biomolecules that direct the formation of a specific polymorph. Here we show how it is possible to analyze the morphology of Coccospheres. Coccospheres are produced by coccolitophores that are one-celled marine phytoplankton that inhabit the upper layers of coastal waters and the open ocean.

Coccolithophores are the primary calcite producers in the ocean, constructing elaborate calcite plates or liths. Recent studies indicate that rising pH levels associated with increased oceanic carbon dioxide uptake may imperil coccolithophore species in the future. One expects that a doubling of present-day concentrations of carbon dioxide could result in a 20 to 40 percent reduction in biogenic calcification of coccolithophores, resulting in malformed calcareous plates and layers of plates. We show in an unprecedented way how CXDI can unveil the shape of these wonderful objects and how it can be further used to monitor the mass of coccoliths.

Sketch of the CXDI set-up showing the different steps necessary to obtain the reconstructed image of the scattering particle

3D image of a coccopshere

3D image of a coccolith

On The Investigation Of Calcium Carbonate Coccospheres By X-ray Coherent Diffraction Imaging [pdf]

Tue, 10 May 2016 10:15:30 +0200
Tue, 10 May 2016 09:23:57 +0200

Contact

Open lectures and seminars