Mohn Research Center for the Brain

Mohn Research Center for the Brain


Understanding plasticity and neural circuit dynamics in the brain

Understanding plasticity and neural circuit dynamics in the brain

 

Understanding the brain is one of the greatest challenges to science, with brain disorders affecting one in three Europeans during their lifetime.

The overriding objective is to identify core principles of plasticity and neural circuit dynamics in the brain, building on our knowledge of the entorhinal-hippocampal circuit and retina

The human brain is enormously complex, with more than 100 trillion different connections between neurons at tiny junctions called synapses. Neural circuits are made up of genetically distinct neuronal types, with unique structural and functional properties. Communication at synaptic junctions, rather than being hard-wired and fixed, is highly plastic and modifiable.

Experience-dependent synaptic plasticity is critical for shaping neural circuit development and circuit dynamics in information processing, and underpins the enormous capacity of the brain for learning and memory. To understand processes such as perception, cognition, learning and memory, and the associated loss of cognitive abilities in Alzheimer’s disease and aging, we must be able to selectively label and manipulate specific cell types within specific circuits that mediate the behavior.


Work Packages (WP)

Work Packages (WP)

The research at the Mohn Brain Center is organized into five interactive work packages (WPs), presented below: 

WP1: Clive R. Bramham
Targeting Arc domains to elucidate the molecular control of synaptic plasticity in enthorhinal-hippocampal circuit
 
WP2: Espen Hartveit
Tuning retinal microcircuits for vision in starlight, twilight and daylight: the role of NMDA and dopamine receptor-mediated gap junction plasticity.
 
WP3: Giulia Quattrocolo​​​​​​​
Role of Cajal-Retzius cells in hippocampal function

WP4: May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser
Role of plasticity in Grid cells emergence in development and adulthood

WP5: Clive R. Bramham
Mechanism of toxic Tau protein in entorhinal-hippocampal circuit in animal model of AD

 


Researchers

Researchers

 

Photo of Clive Bramham.Clive R. Bramham
Center Leader
Department of Biomedicine, UiB
Photo of Espen Hartveit.Espen Hartveit
Professor
Department of Biomedicine, UiB
Cliff Kentros. Photo.Cliff Kentros
Professor
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, NTNU
Edvard Moser. Photo.Edvard Moser
Professor
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, NTNU
May-Britt Moser. Photo.May-Britt Moser
Professor
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, NTNU
Giulia Quattrocolo. Photo.Giulia Quattrocolo
Researcher
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, NTNU
Menno Witter. Photo.Menno Witter
Professor
Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience, NTNU
 

Center Leader

Center Leader


Collaboration

Collaboration

The TMS Brain Research Initiative is hosted by the department of Biomedicine at UiB and organized as a consortium. By combining research expertise and advanced infrastructure at our institutions, this project provides a rich synergy that will advance brain research and support the strategic priorities of UiB and NTNU.

In addition to the breakthrough potential of the project itself, the TMS Brain Initiative will foster the development of young research talent and give added value to basic and translational research environments at the universities.


Element

TMS graphic element. Illustration.

Logos

 

Logo link to University of Bergen

Logo link to Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience

Logo link to Trond Mohn Foundation.


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