Permanent academic staff

Professor dr. May Thorseth is the director of Programme for Applied Ethics at NTNU. Her research interests are in applied ethics; research ethics/ RRI; environmental ethics; deliberative democracy; fundamentalism; information ethics and digital transition.  Vice chairman of NTNU’s Research Ethics committee. Member of the management group of NTNU Sustainability (one of NTNU’s four strategic research areas). Leader of research area Ethical Perspectives. Member of Task Force Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) under Delft university’s presidency of the CESAER network 2014-2017.

Current research projects:

  • BINGO - Bringing Innovation to ongoing water management - a better future under climate change. EU - Horizon 2020, May Thorseth is Ethics advisor of the project.
  • FORFOOD - Frogs, fuel, finance or food? Cultures, values, ethics, arguments and justifications in the management of agricultural land, 2013-2016, funded by NRC, SAMKUL, led by Centre for rural Research. Work package 4: Ethical assessments in the management of agricultural land, led by May Thorseth.
  • BIOSMART - Managing the transition to a "smart" bio economy, funded by NRC, BIONÆR 2015-2018. Lead by Centre for Rural Research. May Thorseth partner of wp 4: Social acceptability - ethics and outcomes. Link to publications

Siri Granum Carson is an associate professor at the Programme for Applied Ethics, with a particular focus on globalization, corporate social responsibility, and business ethics. She is a member of the Management Group of Ocean Science and Technology, one of the strategic research areas at NTNU. She is the ethics representative of the regional committee for medical research ethics, REK Midt-Norge. She is also part of the working committee for the Norwegian Network of Professional Ethics and of EBEN [European Business Ethics Network] Scandinavia, and the external member of the ethics board of IFE Institute for energy technology. Central research areas are corporate social responsibility and business ethics, as well as professional ethics and research ethics. She has written several introductory books on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and on ethics.

Rune Nydal is an associate professor at the Programme for applied ethics. He studied atomic physics (cand.scient) and philosophy (cand.polit) at the University of Bergen. His doctorate from NTNU investigates the philosophical rationale for ELSA (or RRI) initiatives, through a study of the establishment of microarray technology and the FUGE initiative in Norway. Following this, he has been exploring the potential of the ELSA/RRI strategy of close collaboration between natural scientists and humanists in various research projects.  Nydal teaches research ethics and the ethics of science and technology. Nydal is a member of The National Committee for Research Ethics in Science and Technology (NENT).

Permanent administrative staff


Post doc and PhD Researchers

Tom Andreassen
Tom Andreassen is a PhD candidate at the Programme for Applied Ethics working on a project on intellectual property rights, poverty and access to essential medicines. The project is titled: WTO's Agreement on Patent Rights: Local Side Effects of a Global Regime for Patents on Medicine. In 2013, as part of his current project at the Programme, he completed a one year visit as a Global Justice Fellow at Yale University's Global Justice Program, Connecticut, USA. His research interests lie mainly within the fields of ethics, human rights, justice and legitimate governance. Link to publications

Sophia Efstathiou is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Program for Applied Ethics, NTNU. She first studied Mathematics and Physics (Joint Honours, Master of Physics) at Warwick University, and earned her PhD in Philosophy and Science Studies from the University of California San Diego (2009), writing on concepts of race and how they are used in medical research in the US. Sophia´s research deals with questions in the history and philosophy of science and medicine explored in connection with running scientific projects as part of interdisciplinary work. Her current project develops approaches to Responsible Research and Innovation that combine humanistic and arts expertise, to explore the performativity of scientific identity and language.

Rita d’Oliveira Bouman is a PhD candidate at the Programme for Applied Ethics working on a project aiming at characterizing differences and strains that arise from several types of sustainability discourses (e.g. scientific, business and political) in the context of climate change. This project is being done in collaboration with the Industrial Ecology programme from Energy and Process Engineering department at NTNU. The project title is ‘Ethical Dilemmas and Tensions in Sustainability Discourses’. Her research interests are Environmental and Sustainability Ethics and also Environmental Education. Link to publications


My project examines whether the globalized market economy is a sufficient means, or strategy, in order to obtain the goals of sustainable development. I seek to find out whether this ideology, and the connected institutions as IMF, WTO and the World Bank, can both provide global social justice and preserve the environment. Furthermore, I examine the alternative economic strategies, as ecologic economy, which are based on values that reject the growth constraint of the present market economic system.

 


Associated Researchers

Allen Alvarez


Allen has worked on a project that investigates the empirical and normative aspects of debating human enhancement ethics online and across cultures using deliberative methods in scoping for possible point of consensus and divergence within multicultural societies. He also worked on the research networking project Applied Ethics: Technology and Governance of Health and Natural Resources funded by the Research Council of Norway under the ISP-FIDE Programme


Jennifer L. Bailey, (Phd. Korbel School of International Studies) is Professor of Political Science. She is involved in several interdisciplinary projects such as the EU 7th FP project Ocean Certain, and the newly awarded NFR projects: SUSTAIN-FISH (From global ideals to local realities - the foundations of sustainability), “Consequences of land-use change and human activity on anadromous salmonids and the ecosystem services that they provide” and “Valuing the past, sustaining the future: Education, knowledge and identity across three generations in coastal communities; a comparative approach.”  She was project leader of the recently concluded NFR Projects “Modeling an Interdisciplinary Early Warning System for Future Fisheries Scenarios: A Socio-bio-Economic Value-chain Evaluation” and “The Janus Project: A Cross-disciplinary Integrated Eco-systemic Eutrophication Research and Management Approach”.  She is a member of the university strategic focus area “NTNU-Oceans” and of the Marine Systems Working Group of the International Council for Exploration of the Sea. Her areas of research include aquaculture and fisheries management, sustainable development, civil society, collective action and comparative and international politics. Link to articles.


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Giovanni De Grandis is a postdoctoral researcher working on a project on Personalised Medicine (RESET:PM). His areas of interest are Ethics, Political Philosophy, Applied Ethics, Public Policy and Cross-disciplinary Research. His current research focuses on the ethical and political aspects of personalised medicine, with a particular focus on conflicts of values. Other recent topics of research include public health and infectious diseases, urban health, digital technologies and academic publishing, transdisciplinary integration. A recurrent theme in his research is the interplay between normative considerations and the constraints and contingencies of actual circumstances. 

Here is a link to the repository where I have uploaded most of my publications: http://philpapers.org/profile/31689


Vidar Halgunset is a PhD Candidate with RESET’s Personalised Medicine project, concentrating mainly on the epistemic, moral and conceptual questions raised by this term. His disciplinary background is in philosophy, more specifically in the ordinary language style of philosophy. In his master’s thesis, Om slektskap i naturen, he grappled with, among other things, the meanings and moral implications of different relation terms, particularly when applied to inter-species relationships. Vidar also has a longstanding interest in communicating philosophy to a broader audience. You may find some of his philosophical musings at his personal blog: http://orienteringsforsok.blogspot.no/

 


Asle H. Kiran is a researcher, currently coordinating the RRI-work (Responsible Research and Innovation) in the Centre for Digital Life Norway. With a background in Philosophy, Psychology and Linguistics, his research interests include Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind alongside his main focus; the Philosophy and Ethics of Technology. These research interests converge in his long time investigation into the ontological and existential aspects of the technologies that constitute the lifeworld. Kiran works somewhere between the conceptual and the empirical where he explores an ethics with technology rather than an ethics of technology, preferring questions like “how can a person, such as a patient, realize a good personhood through an active adaptation to technology” to questions like “is this a good technology”.

(https://www.cristin.no/as/WebObjects/cristin.woa/wa/fres?sort=ar&pnr=30367&action=sok)

 

I am Full Professor of philosophy at the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Faculty of Humanities, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. I am also qualified as Full Professor in medical ethics, authorized by the Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, where I was head of Unit for Medical Ethics, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine. I hold a PhD (1997) on the political philosophy of Robert Nozick, however subsequently most of my research has been within medical ethics, covering the following subjects: relationship between euthanasia and palliative care (including interviews with terminally ill cancer patients); ethical and clinical aspects of (deep) palliative sedation at the end of life; withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in the seriously ill; and the ethics of organ donation. In the coming years I shall be focussing on the branch normative ethics within ethical theory. I have more than 100 publications, mostly internationally, including in The Lancet Oncology (2009), Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine (2010 & 2015) and Journal of Medical Ethics (several articles). For further detail, including links to publications, please visit my web site www.materstvedt.net

 


Bengt Molander is professor of philosophy at NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology. His main research interests are geared to knowledge as actually used by human beings – knowing in action – in various human practices, including crafts, science and the fine arts. He has argued that an understanding of knowing in action presupposes a notion of what is good for human beings and that ethics and knowledge are intrinsically connected. His main work is The Practice of Knowing and Knowing in Practices (Peter Lang 2015). For other publications, see his employee web site: http://www.ntnu.edu/employees/bengt.molander

 


Per Erling Movik


His research project involves a study of the psychopharmacological enhancement of cognitive and emotional function framed as the individual’s existential choice for self-realization. The project's central issues explore how an individual can interpret her own will to use enhancements, how she can frame her choice in relation to her normal condition and any potential breakdown in that condition, and how she can conceptualize her developing character. He is more generally interested in issues concerning preconditions for and constraints on human development on both the individual and the societal levels. He tend to frame the study of human development as a relation between the interpretation of what I/we really want to achieve in different circumstances, and the interpretation of the viability/sustainability of these individual/collective choices in real life scenarios with all the complex preconditions and constraints involved.


Bjørn Myskja is an active researcher in several externally funded projects such as: "In genes we trust? Biobanks, commercialisation and everyday life" (Project leader Berge Solberg, funded by the Research Council of Norway, ELSA Programme, 2009 – 2012); "Crossover research. Well constructed systems biology" (Project leader Rune Nydal. Research Council of Norway, ELSA Programme, 2010-2013);"Socially robust solar cells" (Project leader Turid Worren Reenaas. Research Council of Norway, NANOMAT Programme, 2011-2014); "Eco-values as product quality attributes in manufacturing of agricultural food ingredients" (Project leader Nina Marianne Iversen. Research Council of Norway , Food Programme, 2011-2015). His research interests include bioethics, ethics of technology, Kantian and Aristotelian ethics, political philosophy, aesthetics.


Berge Solberg is a professor in medical ethics and head of the teaching in medical ethics in the medical school at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). He is the deputy leader of the National Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics (NEM), and the secretary of the Clinical ethics committee at St. Olavs Hospital. Between 2004 and 2013 he was a member of The Norwegian Advisory Board on Biotechnology. Solberg wrote his PhD on the ethics of prenatal diagnosis. Recent years, much of his focus has been on questions in research ethics regarding biobanks and genomics. Links to publications

 


John-Arne Skolbekken has a PhD in Health Science and is Professor in the Department of Social Work and Health Science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His research interests are within modern medical risk discourse, including the ethical implications of such medical practices as medical screening and genetic counselling. His research interests also covers that of the ethics of biobank research. He has further served as a member of the The National Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics (NEM) and is currently serving as member of the ethics committee for the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 4).


Espen D. Stabell is a PhD candidate in philosophy working on a project on uncertainty and responsibility in technological research and innovation. The project is part of the Deep Sea Mining pilot, an interdisciplinary research project under the NTNU Oceans strategic area, investigating different aspects of the yet untried activity of mining for minerals on the ocean floor. A central thesis of Stabell’s project is that the problem of uncertainty is understated in standard assessments and evaluations of risk, and that this poses serious ethical challenges that need to be addressed in order to do deep sea mining in a responsible manner.


Lars Øystein Ursin is a Senior Researcher at NTNU. His current research projects are The ethical basis for parental decisions regarding medical treatment of extremely premature babies at the Department of Public health and general practice, and Eco-values as product quality attributes in manufacturing agricultural food ingredients at the Department of Philosophy and of at NTNU. Ursin's primary research interests are in political and social theory, applied ethics, and philosophy of mind.


Cornelia Vikan is a Globalization Programme PhD research fellow working on a project with the title "Military power and ethics in the grey area of war – Afghanistan". It is a critical ethical-philosophical analysis of the core values of the Norwegian Armed Forces: respect, responsibility and courage.